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musterbeard

Why He Has Flat Stain On His Nose?

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Buffy has white stain on? / under? his nose which i recently noticed and here are 3 pictures of less than good quality taken with smartphone:

AkEHel.jpg

3lc8ql.jpg

IicVAl.jpg

Anybody knows why is this? Fluffy does not have white stain by the way.

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Test Results for the Following:

* Ammonia Level

* Nitrite Level

* Nitrate level

* Ph Level, Tank (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines)

* Ph Level, Tap (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines)

Other Required Info:

* Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops?

* Water temperature?

* Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running?

* What is the name and "size of the filter"(s)?

* How often do you change the water and how much?

* How many days ago was the last water change and how much did you change?

* How many fish in the tank and their size?

* What kind of water additives or conditioners?

* What do you feed your fish and how often?

* Any new fish added to the tank?

* Any medications added to the tank?

* List entire medication/treatment history for fish and tank. Please include salt, Prazi, PP, etc and the approximate time and duration of treatment.

* Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt," bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus?

* Any unusual behavior like staying at the bottom, not eating, etc.?

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could you also take a short video of him to post? the pics of the concerned area is too fuzzy. you can use youtube or photobucket to upload and post here.

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• 4.7 gals since middle 2011 when i got aquarium

• JEBO water filter

• 50% of water change 2/3 times a week

• Buffy - medium size, Fluffy - small size

• No water additives, only dechlorinator

• Flakes in the morning, pellets in the evening, peas a couple of times per week

• No new fish ever

• No medications so far

• Both show a few frayed spots

d9ZArl.jpg

Q1eHNl.jpg

7nFbzl.jpg

Disclosure: No harm was made to fish while shooting

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question. are both these fish in 4.7 gallons? what were they in before? and thank you for showing better pictures..

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looks like normal color change to me (but i am no expert) do you have a lot of gravel?Do they dig around it a lot?

Am I to believe you have a 47 gallon tank, not a 4.7 gallon is this correct??I hope so ;)

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There have been a few topics about these fishies, I believe they are in a 4.7 gal tank, not 47. This seems to be their permanent home.

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There have been a few topics about these fishies, I believe they are in a 4.7 gal tank, not 47. This seems to be their permanent home.

Correct! I do not do water tests and was told by expert i should not since i am beginner and can mess things up. I assume this was the only home for fishies and it is 4.7 gallons - not 47 gallons. Do they dig a lot? Usually not, but they indeed dig a lot after consumption of food like flakes that get everywhere and pollute fishtank.

I like how they express happiness and one of fishies frequently opens and closes mouth a lot when he is excited like trying to communicate something to me. I saw them a few times yawning. Now that is a real cuteness!

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ok hun.. a few things

1.. i think your fish is going a colour change, which is a good thing because to me, it does not look fungul or fuzzy :)

2.. your fish need much more room than what you're providing. i am sure the "expert" assisting you has probably helped you to maintain good health to your fish thus far, but i am not sure with the contitions that you've provided how well you will be able to keep them long term.

you see, fish of a single tail require 20 gallons per fish.. of a fancy (double tail) require a minimum of 10 gallons per fish. we like to advise for fancies that 20 gallons for the first fish and then 10 gallons per fancy there after. so if you have 2 fancies, 30 gallons is ideal.. however, 20 gallons on a strict weekly 70% water change routine and close monitoring of water parameters is fine.

what happens to your gold fish in their current condition? goldfish excrete something called a growth hormone. in their current home, they will grow externally to suit their environment which is small, but internally, they will continue to grow. this will cause all sorts of problems to their organs and unfortunately lead to a premature death :(

by providing them the 30 gallons they need, you not only give them a good chance in life, but provide for them a healthy home. not only do we have complications for the growth hormone that i explained above, we also have a toxic home. goldfish are the messiest fish around. they poop a lot and cause toxins from themselves into the water. high ammonia or high nitrates can be fatal to fish. in such a small home, it's likely without 2 x 100% daily water changes that their environment is toxic to them.

would you consider updating their tank to a minimum 20 gallons of water? and adequate filtration?

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in their current home, they will grow externally to suit their environment which is small, but internally, they will continue to grow. this will cause all sorts of problems to their organs and unfortunately lead to a premature death :(

Are you talking about mental and physical growth?

in such a small home, it's likely without 2 x 100% daily water changes that their environment is toxic to them.

would you consider updating their tank to a minimum 20 gallons of water? and adequate filtration?

2 times per day 100% water changes?! 20 gallons per fish? I thought 5 gallons is the minimum, but 20 gallons? That's whole 75 litres! Not only i cannot afford such big aquarium at the moment, but i don't have place for it.

Expert told me that by replacing small fishtank with bigger will not only make fishies happier but will save on expenses long-term and mean less maintenance.

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physical health is what i refer to. in such a small environment they will suffer what is called stunted growth.. being that their external bodies grow to suit their small tank, but their internal organs continue to grow.. what happens here is that their internals continue to grow until it causes strain to their organs, then they fail to function properly which will cause them to die.

it may sound strange to you, but we see it all to often here on the forum :(

the only way to remove the growth hormone and the toxins from the water is to do water changes. here, we know that even with 20 gallons minimum, unless a 70% water change weekely is undertaken, the nitrates will rise and fish will be poisoned from their own toxins.

i know this is a lot of information to process, but if you do want to keep fish the correct way, you will consider getting them a minimum 20 (preferred 30) gallon tank for the two fish you currently have. you may want to consider finding or buying the cheaper alternative for now which is a 20 gallon food safe storage tub until you can afford a larger tank.

water tests should be carried out weekly for Ammonia, Nitrates, Nitrates and PH. these are essential params to maintain for keeping fish healthy. Ammonia, Nitrite should be at 0, Nitrates should be under 20ppm and PH should be a minimum 7.4-7.6. these are the ideal conditions for goldfish. a dechlorinator such as Seachem Prime should be used to bind toxic waste from in the water as well as chlorine and other harmful chemicals that goldfish do not do well in. here is the link to the product so that you can read all the benefits for yourself http://www.seachem.com/Products/product_pages/Prime.html

the test kit to test your water parameters should be a liquid drops test kit. here on the koko's forum, we like to use API water test kits for the most accurate results.

we often go to our local fish shops thinking that they are experts, but most of the time, they're looking out for a financial gain. you see, they like to sell products and fish. by providing us the incorrect information, they are making money. goldfish, given the correct environment can live upto 20 years.. fancy goldfish, 5-7 years if not longer. by providing more space for them to live in and frequent water changes as well as good filtration and adequate aeration, we are giving them the best chance in life.

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in their current home, they will grow externally to suit their environment which is small, but internally, they will continue to grow. this will cause all sorts of problems to their organs and unfortunately lead to a premature death :(

Are you talking about mental and physical growth?

in such a small home, it's likely without 2 x 100% daily water changes that their environment is toxic to them.

would you consider updating their tank to a minimum 20 gallons of water? and adequate filtration?

2 times per day 100% water changes?! 20 gallons per fish? I thought 5 gallons is the minimum, but 20 gallons? That's whole 75 litres! Not only i cannot afford such big aquarium at the moment, but i don't have place for it.

Expert told me that by replacing small fishtank with bigger will not only make fishies happier but will save on expenses long-term and mean less maintenance.

Not to be harsh (I am sorry if this seems so! ): ) but what makes this expert an expert? Is he a breeder or professional keeper with long term knowledge of fish? I understand sometimes pet shop people and similar give advice, and while they do try many are sorely misinformed, and some even are blatantly fine with giving inadequate information in order to secure a sale. Maybe your friend is more familiar with tropicals, most of which can tolerate a higher stocking density then our goldie friends? :) He/She might be applying their knowledge from other fish to goldies without thinking that they themselves might have separate needs.

For example, I am, first and foremost a koi breeder, though I am not currently active in that community due to my current state not allowing koi (invasive species) so my stock has been distribute to other breeders. In addition I have bred bettas for 6 years, and kept goldfish for a similar amount of time. In the beginning, I was very guilty of applying koi knowledge to goldfish, and the treatment the much bigger and more robust koi endured easily was not fun for the poor goldies! Being an expert in one area does not translate into knowing everything about every species, I have learnt :) I had to learn a lot from scratch for the more fragile goldies.

As for the stocking ratios, there are many reasons the 10gal fancy/20gal common is strongly recommended, especially for small tanks here. First is the hypothetical growth hormone, that Stakos has already covered for you, which can cause stunted growth/slow growth and an increased risk of disease and health problems. Either way, less water means less growth and more disease prone fish, though we can debate the exact mechanic until the cows come home :). Second is the production of waste products by your fish, ammonia (highly toxic to fish) which is broken down into nitrate (less toxic) and then into nitrite (least toxic) by the bacteria in your filter. This is, as you may already know, the nitrogen cycle and is what occurs in established tanks like yours who have ‘cycled’ or had the time and correct input (ammonia, whether from fish or artificial sources) for the good bacteria to establish themselves in the filter so they can basically eat the ammonia and other nasties. :) This is why we cycle tanks before adding fish (or if you are bad like me, try to do it with fish in them while keeping the water as non toxic as possible!) and sometimes add established media to new tanks to ‘seed’ them with the good bacteria and make them cycle faster. It’s also why fish added to a brand new just set up and not cycle tank tend to just die, because of all the ammonia. Anyway, if you ever set up a bigger tank for these guys we can tell you all about it if you like. :)

But back to business! In such a small amount of water, as the fish grow they will start to produce a lot more waste (and goldies produce a lot normally anyway!) and your cycle may not be able to manage because of the small volume of water (so the waste is more concentrate) and smaller filter and water turn over (how much water it filters per hour) so this waste will start to build up and become toxic to the fish, often in a very small amount of time. In a larger tank this is much more easily avoided. This is also why we test our water, so we can see how much ammonia and other nasty things are in it, so we know if something is wrong with our cycle so we can keep our fish friends happy and healthy for the long term. :)

I recently got a brand new 102L (26ish gal) tall tank. It’s not very large actually, only 60cm long. They seem a lot bigger then they are really! You can often pick up second hand tanks very cheap off of the internet. Even brand new tanks too, sometimes.

Some goldfish may be able to survive in a tank like yours, even for years, but they will never grow to their full size or really thrive. When you think of how big and how long they can live with proper care, you see the difference a big tank and all of that makes :)

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I do not do water tests and was told by expert i should not since i am beginner and can mess things up.

Musterbeard, I am just going to be very direct and say this: your so-called expert is 100% wrong. We have teenagers and even younger fish keepers on this forum who handle both larger tanks AND checking their water parameters with extreme ease. I do not see how you could mess things up, and should you need help, you could also post here, OR you could even ask your expert, since surely as an "expert" he or she should also be a pro at using testing kits.

Finally, you've been informed multiple times of the need to get a bigger tank/tub/container to house your fish and the necessity of testing your water parameters. I can understand that you simply cannot procure these things for a number of reasons, but having an expert tell you not to do so is not a very good excuse.

Edited by dnalex

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I just wanted to pop in to let you know that 20 gallons is only about 76 litres, which really isn't that big! it sounds like a lot, but it's more or less a 2 foot/61cm tank. I used to have a 63l tank, and its dimensions were 61 x 31 x 42cm (but that's external measurements, so though the measurements say that's about 79l, you have to think about displacement from substrate, ornaments, internal filters etc). so if you got a tank a little wider and taller, then I reckon you'd be able to get to the 76l necessary. the fish would be so much happier, trust me.

before I joined the forum, I had two in a 28l tank, and they looked horribly cramped, even though one was still tiny at the time. once I upgraded to the 63l (though still too small really), they looked happier with the extra space, and even happier when I got them into the 160l tank I have now (but with 2 extra friends). if you're worried about cost, I got my 160l tank plus stand for £60 - second-hand AND they drove it over to my flat because I don't have my own transport! I got my 63l plus stand for £40 plus delivery second-hand too. I reckon that, if you're paying for, at most, £1 (well, insert your currency here lol) per litre sort of thing, then you are getting a good deal.

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I like how they express happiness and one of fishies frequently opens and closes mouth a lot when he is excited like trying to communicate something to me. I saw them a few times yawning. Now that is a real cuteness!

Yawning in fish is a sign of severe discomfort, often parasites.

If you don't want to follow the advice of the very experienced and knowledgeable members of the board, then you should buy some good books that have been written by real experts. These two are excellent:

http://www.amazon.ca/Fancy-Goldfish-Complete-Guide-Collecting/dp/0834804484/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1335629622&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.ca/Fundamentals-Ornamental-Health-Helen-Roberts/dp/0813814014/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1335629644&sr=8-4

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physical health is what i refer to. in such a small environment they will suffer what is called stunted growth.. being that their external bodies grow to suit their small tank, but their internal organs continue to grow.. what happens here is that their internals continue to grow until it causes strain to their organs, then they fail to function properly which will cause them to die.

it may sound strange to you, but we see it all to often here on the forum :(

the only way to remove the growth hormone and the toxins from the water is to do water changes. here, we know that even with 20 gallons minimum, unless a 70% water change weekely is undertaken, the nitrates will rise and fish will be poisoned from their own toxins.

i know this is a lot of information to process, but if you do want to keep fish the correct way, you will consider getting them a minimum 20 (preferred 30) gallon tank for the two fish you currently have. you may want to consider finding or buying the cheaper alternative for now which is a 20 gallon food safe storage tub until you can afford a larger tank.

water tests should be carried out weekly for Ammonia, Nitrates, Nitrates and PH. these are essential params to maintain for keeping fish healthy. Ammonia, Nitrite should be at 0, Nitrates should be under 20ppm and PH should be a minimum 7.4-7.6. these are the ideal conditions for goldfish. a dechlorinator such as Seachem Prime should be used to bind toxic waste from in the water as well as chlorine and other harmful chemicals that goldfish do not do well in. here is the link to the product so that you can read all the benefits for yourself http://www.seachem.c...ages/Prime.html

the test kit to test your water parameters should be a liquid drops test kit. here on the koko's forum, we like to use API water test kits for the most accurate results.

we often go to our local fish shops thinking that they are experts, but most of the time, they're looking out for a financial gain. you see, they like to sell products and fish. by providing us the incorrect information, they are making money. goldfish, given the correct environment can live upto 20 years.. fancy goldfish, 5-7 years if not longer. by providing more space for them to live in and frequent water changes as well as good filtration and adequate aeration, we are giving them the best chance in life.

First time i hear such thing about fishes' organs. Interesting... Fishies that i have are fancy goldfish? I thought i have common goldfish... Oh i already use Prime's dechlorinator by the way.

Not to be harsh (I am sorry if this seems so! ): ) but what makes this expert an expert? Is he a breeder or professional keeper with long term knowledge of fish? I understand sometimes pet shop people and similar give advice, and while they do try many are sorely misinformed, and some even are blatantly fine with giving inadequate information in order to secure a sale. Maybe your friend is more familiar with tropicals, most of which can tolerate a higher stocking density then our goldie friends? :) He/She might be applying their knowledge from other fish to goldies without thinking that they themselves might have separate needs.

For example, I am, first and foremost a koi breeder, though I am not currently active in that community due to my current state not allowing koi (invasive species) so my stock has been distribute to other breeders. In addition I have bred bettas for 6 years, and kept goldfish for a similar amount of time. In the beginning, I was very guilty of applying koi knowledge to goldfish, and the treatment the much bigger and more robust koi endured easily was not fun for the poor goldies! Being an expert in one area does not translate into knowing everything about every species, I have learnt :) I had to learn a lot from scratch for the more fragile goldies.

As for the stocking ratios, there are many reasons the 10gal fancy/20gal common is strongly recommended, especially for small tanks here. First is the hypothetical growth hormone, that Stakos has already covered for you, which can cause stunted growth/slow growth and an increased risk of disease and health problems. Either way, less water means less growth and more disease prone fish, though we can debate the exact mechanic until the cows come home :). Second is the production of waste products by your fish, ammonia (highly toxic to fish) which is broken down into nitrate (less toxic) and then into nitrite (least toxic) by the bacteria in your filter. This is, as you may already know, the nitrogen cycle and is what occurs in established tanks like yours who have ‘cycled’ or had the time and correct input (ammonia, whether from fish or artificial sources) for the good bacteria to establish themselves in the filter so they can basically eat the ammonia and other nasties. :) This is why we cycle tanks before adding fish (or if you are bad like me, try to do it with fish in them while keeping the water as non toxic as possible!) and sometimes add established media to new tanks to ‘seed’ them with the good bacteria and make them cycle faster. It’s also why fish added to a brand new just set up and not cycle tank tend to just die, because of all the ammonia. Anyway, if you ever set up a bigger tank for these guys we can tell you all about it if you like. :)

But back to business! In such a small amount of water, as the fish grow they will start to produce a lot more waste (and goldies produce a lot normally anyway!) and your cycle may not be able to manage because of the small volume of water (so the waste is more concentrate) and smaller filter and water turn over (how much water it filters per hour) so this waste will start to build up and become toxic to the fish, often in a very small amount of time. In a larger tank this is much more easily avoided. This is also why we test our water, so we can see how much ammonia and other nasty things are in it, so we know if something is wrong with our cycle so we can keep our fish friends happy and healthy for the long term. :)

I recently got a brand new 102L (26ish gal) tall tank. It’s not very large actually, only 60cm long. They seem a lot bigger then they are really! You can often pick up second hand tanks very cheap off of the internet. Even brand new tanks too, sometimes.

Some goldfish may be able to survive in a tank like yours, even for years, but they will never grow to their full size or really thrive. When you think of how big and how long they can live with proper care, you see the difference a big tank and all of that makes :)

Thanks for such big post. When asked on another forum what media i am using, i told i have sponge and carbon sack. The person told me that this is not media. Do you know what he/she meant?

Yawning in fish is a sign of severe discomfort, often parasites.

If you don't want to follow the advice of the very experienced and knowledgeable members of the board, then you should buy some good books that have been written by real experts. These two are excellent:

http://www.amazon.ca...35629622&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.ca...35629644&sr=8-4

Gulp... Thanks for informing.

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I like how they express happiness and one of fishies frequently opens and closes mouth a lot when he is excited like trying to communicate something to me. I saw them a few times yawning. Now that is a real cuteness!

Yawning in fish is a sign of severe discomfort, often parasites.

If you don't want to follow the advice of the very experienced and knowledgeable members of the board, then you should buy some good books that have been written by real experts. These two are excellent:

http://www.amazon.ca...35629622&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.ca...35629644&sr=8-4

"Yawning" (and gasping near the surface) can also indicate low oxygen levels, which is very likely to be the case in your current 4.7 gallon set-up. Goldfish have higher oxygen needs than many other fish. Most members here use airstones to add surface movement, which oxygenates the water.

As an immediate measure, you should get 2 Sterilite (or other food-safe tubs) that are at least 76 litres each. They're cheap and would go a long way towards helping your fish, while you save up for a tank big enough for both of them.

You will also need one air pump, two airstones, airline tubing, two valves that prevent backflow, and a T-valve (if the pump has only one outlet). It sounds like a lot but it will cost you the equivalent of about $60 in US money total, and it's certainly worth it for the sake of your goldfish. You'll need another filter, too, and you should add some media from the old one when you set it up.

Please listen to what the other members here have said, and don't be afraid to ask if you need more help. Your goldfish are helpless and totally dependent on you for proper care; they can't just sneak out of the house and find someone else to live with (like cats can). Good luck. :)

Edited by adverbemonade

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Just to add a bit more...carbon is pretty unnecessary and often causes more problems than good. You can get bioballs which are a good media for filters. But first correcing the space issues, then the filter issues, all the while reading up on cycling, testing and doing regular water changes are our keys here to good fish health and happiness.

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Maybe you might want to consider re homing your goldfish if you can not get a proper aquarium to house them in :( I suggest a betta fish would be most happy in your tank :)

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As someone who is probably as tight with money as you are let me suggest to you to use your local free classified site. Over here it is called craigslist, the UK has gumtree not sure what is best in your area but a google search pulled up this:http://www.quora.com/What-are-the-equivalents-of-Craigslist-in-Israel On craigslist we have a for sale section and a community section, people list tanks on both, most times they are selling the whole workings for the tank. The key is to haggle, ask them to cut the price in half first then wait for them to give you a better price. There is also a wanted section where you can post for cheap used tanks.

Now if you are really cheap like me, you check out the free ads on your preferred site. There is also a wonderful place called freecycle and there are freecycles in Israel. http://www.freecycle.org/group/IL/Israel Freecycle is a place where people post ads giving away gently used items that they don't care to sell and would prefer not to throw in the trash. You can also post want ads on freecycle. You have to join the group and all the ads are streamed into your email, and you reply or post through your email as well. Freecycle was how I got my first real aquarium which was 20gallons or 75 liters, included stand and filter!

As another person said, 20 gallon tank really doesn't take up much space at all, and a 30 gallon tall tank takes the same amount of space, just taller.

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"Yawning" (and gasping near the surface) can also indicate low oxygen levels, which is very likely to be the case in your current 4.7 gallon set-up. Goldfish have higher oxygen needs than many other fish. Most members here use airstones to add surface movement, which oxygenates the water.

I use airstone by the way which is connected to tube where tube is connected to air pump:

8dn1Il.jpg

Just to add a bit more...carbon is pretty unnecessary and often causes more problems than good. You can get bioballs which are a good media for filters. But first correcing the space issues, then the filter issues, all the while reading up on cycling, testing and doing regular water changes are our keys here to good fish health and happiness.

Well carbon makes water transparent, doesn't it? Anything more than this? When i got aquarium, it had small sack with carbon which supposed to be changed on monthly basis and that's why i have bought new for $15 if to convert to US dollars.

By the way, do you people think this pineapple is useful for fishies or should be removed as it takes space?

http://imgur.com/a/pzsPU

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By the way, do you people think this pineapple is useful for fishies or should be removed as it takes space?

http://imgur.com/a/pzsPU

Definitely remove it, and some of the gravel, and other ornaments. You really should be a bigger tub/tank, but until then, this will at least create more space AND more water volume.

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Musterbeard-

I'm a little disappointed that you haven't upgraded yet. :( I and many other people on the forum have told you many times that you simply can't keep two common goldfish in a tank that isn't even 5 gallons. I've told you that you can use a plastic storage bin until you can afford a tank, but they cant stay in that little tiny one. You can easily get a 30 gallon storage bin for under $30 :) I'm sorry, I know this is coming off as rude, and I don't mean it that way, but it's only fair to your fish that you upgrade. If you don't have the room for the aquarium that this type of fish requires, perhaps it would be best to rehome them and get a betta :)

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Definitely remove it, and some of the gravel, and other ornaments. You really should be a bigger tub/tank, but until then, this will at least create more space AND more water volume.

Thanks, i will remove pineapple for sure, but should i remove artificial plant? It would be boring there for fishies...

If you don't have the room for the aquarium that this type of fish requires, perhaps it would be best to rehome them and get a betta :)

You have got to understand that accepting this fishtank with fishies and becoming fishkeeper and importantly having expenses with it wasn't my idea. Relative told me that caring for fish requires nothing to do on my part but feeding once per day so my mom took the aquarium because i don't know what would otherwise happen to fishies. As with everything, there is responsibility involved... If fishies would choose between me and their unknown destiny awaiting them, i think they would choose me and in my opinion fishies deserve to be free.

What did you mean by "rehome"? To pass them to another fishkeeper that meets required terms for keeping them? Well if i care about Buffy & Fluffy it would be not easy to find one and will require appointing interviews (exaggeration?) to find the worthy. Otherwise i want to know their origin of dwelling (which i suppose is somewhere in China?) and release them to live free because i don't want them be my "prisoners" any longer. Let me know the place in China please.

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Definitely remove it, and some of the gravel, and other ornaments. You really should be a bigger tub/tank, but until then, this will at least create more space AND more water volume.

Thanks, i will remove pineapple for sure, but should i remove artificial plant? It would be boring there for fishies...

If you don't have the room for the aquarium that this type of fish requires, perhaps it would be best to rehome them and get a betta :)

You have got to understand that accepting this fishtank with fishies and becoming fishkeeper and importantly having expenses with it wasn't my idea. Relative told me that caring for fish requires nothing to do on my part but feeding once per day so my mom took the aquarium because i don't know what would otherwise happen to fishies. As with everything, there is responsibility involved... If fishies would choose between me and their unknown destiny awaiting them, i think they would choose me and in my opinion fishies deserve to be free.

What did you mean by "rehome"? To pass them to another fishkeeper that meets required terms for keeping them? Well if i care about Buffy & Fluffy it would be not easy to find one and will require appointing interviews (exaggeration?) to find the worthy. Otherwise i want to know their origin of dwelling (which i suppose is somewhere in China?) and release them to live free because i don't want them be my "prisoners" any longer. Let me know the place in China please.

Erm...

Yes, I understand that it wasn't your idea :) but now that they are in your care, you are responsible for them, and therefore should make sure that they are getting the care they need :) that's all.

You can put up an ad on Craigslist, or put up a thread in the "giving away" section of the forum. :) I'm sure somebody will take them. They're adorable :) I'm not quite understanding that last part...

Anyways, sorry to come off as harsh, I just hate to see your cute little fishies sad, and I wish they could have the tank space they need.

Edited by pandamanda111

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