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Telescope with possible fin rot


Niffarious

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This fish was given to me when I purchased another, to see if I could turn it around.

It was imported from China around December. According to the owner, when she consolidated a couple goldfish holding tanks into one the trouble started. A pair of highly aggressive Ryukins bullied one to death and this one took quite a beating as well.

The fish is in QT now with a filter seeded from a healthy aquarium.

The pH at the store was the same as our tap water - about 6. Far too low. I don't want to shock the fish, so I've added coral to slowly bring that up. Anyway:

  • * Ammonia Level- 0
  • * Nitrite Level - 0
  • * Nitrate level - 0
  • * Ph Level, Tank - 6
  • * Ph Level, Tap - 6
  • * Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops? API
  • * Water temperature? 70F
  • * Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running? 15 gall QT set up a couple of days ago
  • * What is the name and "size of the filter"(s)? Aquaclear 30 I think

The only symptoms the fish shows are raggedy fins (but no open wounds or fungus or anything, even on the fins) and general lethargy/weakness. I do not know if the fins are a result of weakness or the beating it was taking from the Ryukins...or both.

I'm having a hard time locating any prazi pro which I'd like to use as a general QT measure - but aside from that, how should I go about treating this fish?

tele05.jpg

tele03.jpg

tele02.jpg

tele04.jpg

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Before anything else, we have to address the pH. As you know, 6 is way too low, and will cause problems. What do you have by ways of buffers? It really needs to be brought up to about 7.2-7.4 and kept there. As for water changes, you will need to add buffer to your tap water (in a bucket) or age the water overnight to bring it up into neutral range.

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I'm going to go pick up some more buffers tomorrow (I need this for my main tank as well). In the meantime, I put the coral in there to bring it up slowly. When I did this in my main tank, the pH was brought up to 7.5 in a few days. (I think 3 or so.) In my experience, a fast pH swing can be a bad thing - so my plan was to let the coral do what it does, and then have the buffer on hand for water changes.

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I would add some baking soda now. Drastic downward swings of pH are dangerous. The same could not be said of upswings.

Edited by dnalex
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Hm, I think that might have been someone else? I haven't had any problems for a while - but I can certainly use baking soda asap if a fast upswing will not harm the fish.

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I deleted that part because it was someone else :)

6 is really bad for goldfish, and will stress them out majorly. Actually, 6 can lead to death :(

If you can add some baking soda that would be fantastic. Just add 1/2 teaspoon and wait for 15 minutes to check on it to see where your pH is. It should hold for a bit.

I'm sure am upswing of the pH will be a bit stressing to the goldfish, but the benefits here far outweigh the cost. :)

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You may have been confusing me with them because I DID have pH issues I came to the board with some time ago. I couldn't figure out why my fish kept getting stressed after water changes - then realized the tap water pH had crashed significantly.

My main concern was that the fish were kept at a pH of 6 for months (they arrived at the store in December) so they haven't been in the low pH for just a short time, it's been a while. However, I can most certainly bump it up with baking soda.

Do you think I should wait to see the effects of changing the water chemistry before trying to medicate? Also - this fish, as well as the healthier one, are both eating with no issues. I can't comment on their poop yet. ;)

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I actually don't think you need to medicate at all. I think that many times issues come up because the fish are stressed and they are unable to cope under these conditions. I bet if you bring conditions up to ideal, they will slowly but sure heal. :)

It's not ideal, I think they are much better off in neutral pH. What you can do, if you like, is to add even less baking soda so that the pH only rises by 0.2-0.3 points. Then later tonight, do the same. Then increase a little more in this fashion until you get to 7.2-7.4.

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That sounds like a good plan. And I would love to not have to medicate them. I figure they were certainly under a lot of stress - I know for a fact the shipment was held at the airport far longer than was ideal due to some import SNAFU, and that they have been overcrowded, in a low pH, and bullied. So hopefully with some TLC meds won't be necessary.

I'm going to give the baking soda a go, and I will update here. :)

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Definitely going to do fluke treatment. The telescope seems to be surface breathing quite a bit, but its respiration does not seem elevated.

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i agree that from what i see too, there is no need to medicate. infact, i don't think your fish has finrot at all.. finrot normally has a fuzzy whiteness to it.. i don't see this symptom at all..

it's possible that the fish may have had a finrot problem in the past or was bullied by other fish, tail caught in filter etc etc.. one can only guess, but, from what i see, there is no finrot..

i would suggest as alex has re the PH.. better to keep it stable to something on or over 7.4, closer to the 8 is ideal. but you need to address water coming from the tap also.. if that has a huge PH difference (to the lower) from the tank's PH, then the buffer needs to treat the tap water before it enters the tank.

goldfish can handle a fast increase in PH, but a fast decrease can be harmful to them.

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Hey fellow British Columbian :D

My tap water pH is also low, around 6-6.5. When i first brought my goldfish home, he kept on gasping on the surface, so I tested my parameters and found out about the low pH.

So, I went and bought Seachem's Alkaline Buffer. I added them to my tank, and it brought the pH up to 7.8 right away with no negative consequences to the goldfish whatsoever. The fish stopped gasping few hours later, so I would say the behaviour change was dramatic and for the better quite fast.

On a side note, I bought some plants from the same lfs and decided to test their water (just for the heck of it) at home and found out that their pH as 7.8 as well. So it might not be true she you said they've been on a low pH since December.

Best of luck to you!

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Hey fellow British Columbian :D

My tap water pH is also low, around 6-6.5. When i first brought my goldfish home, he kept on gasping on the surface, so I tested my parameters and found out about the low pH.

So, I went and bought Seachem's Alkaline Buffer. I added them to my tank, and it brought the pH up to 7.8 right away with no negative consequences to the goldfish whatsoever. The fish stopped gasping few hours later, so I would say the behaviour change was dramatic and for the better quite fast.

On a side note, I bought some plants from the same lfs and decided to test their water (just for the heck of it) at home and found out that their pH as 7.8 as well. So it might not be true she you said they've been on a low pH since December.

Best of luck to you!

Thank you for this! :)

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I bumped up the pH to 7.5 today and have a proper buffer again. The telescope is eating, pooping, and swimming normally. Once in a while surface breathes, but not a lot. The ends of his fins do not appear to be fuzzy or red or irritated, so I'm hoping for the best. :)

tele06.jpg

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Have you checked Island Pets Unlimited? They used to be Big Al's, so they might still carry them. Or Aquarium West. I know they're a tad pricey, but they have everything under the sun it seems.

Or North America Pet Stores in Kingsway, the lady is very helpful, so she probably could tell you where to get one.

The only reason I got it online was because the alkaline buffer is much cheaper online and it's free shipping, so might as well.

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Actually a buddy of mine is part owner of Ocean Aquatics, he can order some for me if I can't find it so I think I'm good. Love North American Pet Store. My oranda is from her.

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I wanted to update. So far, so good - mostly.

Both fish are more active, eating plenty, defecating normally and seem fine. You would have NO idea the telescope looked to be at death's door when I got it.

Yesterday, both fish looked to have one or two little...pustules or something. On their heads - these looked like little whiteheads. By the time I got batteries for my camera 24 hours later they were gone and have not come back. Definitely wasn't ick, and really and truly looked like a whitehead. Any ideas?

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