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Question about salt

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Hi all, so my local groceries have decided to stop selling salt that has no anti caking agent / iodine. And as aquarium salt is severely over priced for essentially the same thing without any added additives. I'm trying I find a safe alternative. Has anyone had any experience with pool salt? Will this be alright for the aquarium?

Thanks

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I do not have any experience with pool salt, but as far as I can tell the Morton's pool salt should be fine.

According to the website it contains no iodine or anti-caking agents. So, if the only ingredient is salt you should be good to go with that, just check out the ingredients to be certain.

http://www.mortonsalt.com/faqs/pool-salt-faqs

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Thx for the reply. I just called the company of the brand of pool salt that I normally get. And it says pure sea salt naturally evaporated by solar with no additives. However it does also say may contain metal chelating agent.

Anyone know if the metal chelating agent will cause any problems in aquariums?

Thx again

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Yes. And I'm happy to answer the question as it's an important one.

Chelating agents are compounds (combined ions or atoms) that are added to stuff to detoxify it usually. They bind with heavy metals, lead, mercury and arsenic for example and make them inactive.

They also have another related function which is the function that is wanted when added to salt. That is, the agent stabilizes the salt's inherent minerals. When added to water, the agent is diluted and then seeks to bind with minerals in the water but at a very low dose/rate.

Chelating agents/ions are in other products we use in the aquarium. Antibiotics contain some for example.

The main thing to consider is your own source water and it's mineral content. Using a salt with a chelating agent in can affect your pH.

It will not harm your fish because the dosage is incredibly minimal but it can harm your water balance.

This may be good or bad depending on your individual kH/gH factors. Very broadly speaking they will make the water a little softer and can lower pH but if your pH is stable usually and at the high end, it will be a very marginal thing..

If your tap water contained lead or trace arsenic (yes some do) it might actually be beneficial.

Anyway, yes you can use it with ease. It is not a big NO-NO additive, like YPS for example and it will NOT harm your fish but I would advice you to monitor your pH closely while using it :)

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Hi trinket. Thx for the reply.

I think I understand. So if I have crushed coral or use a commercial buffer like seachem gold buffer. I will get as u say softer water from the chelating agent. But. As long as theirs high enough kH/gh the ph won't crash. And will essentially be fine to use?

Is that correct. My pH is 7.8

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Yes correct. Shouldn't have problems with that salt if you are using crushed coral in your tank for mineral stability.

Check pH after a day anyway.

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Thanks very much trinket :) ur a wealth of knowledge

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