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White Spot Problem


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  • Regular Member

We've just got, what I think, is a white spot problem with our fish. We have 4 fish in total; 2 zebra and 2 others (can't for the life of me remember what they're called at present - one is in the picture below). We had the 2 zebras in the tank for around 4 weeks and then introduced the 2 others. Around a week later they started to get white spots on their bodies and fins. They all seem lively enough at the moment but I obviously want to treat this now.

On Thursday I added 3ml of Love Fish Anti White Spot and Parasite treatment as per the instructions on the bottle. Then 4 days later (Monday) I added a further 3ml of treatment. From what I can see though this doesn't seem to be having any effect on the fish and they still seem to be covered in white spots; some worse than others.

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Amonia, Nitrate (toxic) levels: 0

Nitrate level: 40-160ppm

PH: Neutral

Tank: Biorb 30 (30 litres)

10% water change every 7 days

fishy.jpg

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  • Regular Member

Apologies. Here's the rest of the answers:

Salt: No (was planning on introducing that today as I heard it can help?)

Water temperature: 18 Celcius (these are not tropical fish)

Last water change: 6 days ago

Fish in tank and size: 4 fish approximately 3-4cm

Feed: Flakes once a day

Behaviour: No unusual behaviour.

Thanks again.

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we can treat Ich with temps of 28-30C and salt concentration of 0.2-0.3%

i don't know much beyond goldfish as goldfish is the only fish i have kept. we will need to know if these can tolerate temps of 30C which is approximately 80F and a salt level of 0.3%

this is the routine i would take if my goldies had an Ich outbreak. lets see what others have to say.

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  • Regular Member

The fish in your photo looks like a platie or mollie, those are indeed tropical fish :)

And by zebras you mean zebra danios? If so, I'd classify them as tropical too.

Both species can tolerate salt well. I would go with what Stakos has suggested, upping the temperature and salting the tank.

Can you tell us more about the set up? Many times ich outbreaks are triggered by other factors. What size is the tank?

Also, I'm going to move this from the goldfish to the tropical section :)

Edited by Chrissy_Bee
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  • Regular Member

Thanks for replying. The tank is a 30 litre Biorb. It's a simple set up as we just wanted to keep fish without the need for a heater so they are all temperate fish (just in case we decided in the future to get into the tropical set up). Is there any way of treating them without having to purchase a heater and upping the temperature?

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Sorry, I missed your tank stats in the first post. I think it would be a good idea to do a very large water change, your nitrates are quite high and that can stress fish. You can treat with meds rather than the salt and heat routine. We prefer the latter because it's always better to avoid meds when possible. Do you know the active ingredient in the stuff you already added?

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Hi.

With the water change what would you recommend - 50%?

The ingredients of the current treatment are, per 100ml: Formaldehyde 5,000mg, Malachite Green Oxalate 47mg

Thanks again, Alan

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i think it's best that you do 2 x 80% waterchanges back to back to bring the nitrates down as low as possible as soon as you can. do not add any more treatments.

you will need to buy a heater and increase the temp to 30C and begin salt treatment.

salt is 1 level teaspoon for every 1 US gallon of water. if you have 30 gallons, that is 30 level teaspoons of pure salt. make sure that the salt does not contain anit caking agents. this will bring the level of salt to 0.1%

after 12 hours, repeat the salt routine to bring the salt level to 0.2% and then again after another 12 hours to bring the salt level to 0.3%

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If I'm reading this correct it is a 30L which is about 7.5 gallons,yes I would consider these types of fish tropical as they come from and do best in warmer water,I also agree with the purchasing of heater & slowly raising the heat to about 80degrees and adding 1 level teaspoon per gallon and daily w/c's after initial dose for approximately 2 weeks or more depending when you see the last ich sack fall of fish :( good luck with your fish :)

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The reason people are suggesting heating to treat them is because the higher temperature speeds up the life cycle of the protozoan and helps heal them up faster, and it looks like you've got a pretty bad infestation. This means that you can have it gone in a week rather than 3-4 weeks at the lower temperature, giving your fish a better chance at surviving it.

I'd also add that the best treatment is prevention. To prevent another outbreak later, you might want to change more water weekly. Before you change it, test your nitrate and then calculate how much you need to change to get it under 10ppm. So if your tank is 30 liters and your nitrate is 60, you need to change 25 liters. But hopefully with larger water changes than 10% it won't get that high in a week. :)

Good luck with your fish. How are they acting?

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