Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Mollie

Driftwood Dangerous?

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone!

So I just purchased a new 45 gallon for my goldies along with a beautiful piece of grapevine driftwood as decor. As I was reading through some older posts, I noticed that some people were saying that driftwood can sometimes be unsafe for the goldfish and can affect their water negatively.

Should I finish soaking my driftwood and just add to the tank and keep on eye on it, or should I ditch it all together? I would love to hear any opinions on the matter. :) Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a very bad time with Wood. It helped to kill 2 of my fish and later taking my favorite fish of all time. If its to big it could harbor over time bad bacteria. Sometimes it can lower your Ph. Also some woods will get a white film over them to, not good either.

My opinion, I dont like logs in my tank.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a very bad time with Wood. It helped to kill 2 of my fish and later taking my favorite fish of all time. If its to big it could harbor over time bad bacteria. Sometimes it can lower your Ph. Also some woods will get a white film over them to, not good either.

My opinion, I dont like logs in my tank.

Aw I'm so sorry koko! that's so sad. :( What kind of driftwood did you use? Did you soak it for a long time before?

I've also heard that driftwood goes through like 2 weird/bad stages and then becomes safe for fish use. Have you ever heard of that before?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with Koko. I have soft water (low kH) and once had driftwood cause a massive pH drop and kill my two favorite fish :(

Since then I've never taken the chance of trying wood in my tank again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always had wood in my tanks with out problems (5 years).

I don't know about "2 weird/bad stages" but wood can release tannins and that will lower your ph. At first the wood may release a larger ammount of tannins, but over time it will slow and your water will stay in the normal range.

Also, some wood will get a white film on it. It does not seem to affect the fish or plants. However I would suggest scrubbing it off when it developes, it looks bad anyway. Like the tannins, it will also go away. I keep bristlenose plecos with my goldfish and they will eat the film so I don't have to scrub it off.

When I add wood, sometimes I soak it, other times I just add it to the tank and watch the PH. For you, I would suggest soaking the wood for a few weeks to a few months, depending on the size and what the PH reads.

Just remember, we all have different ways of fishkeeping. We have to, because we all have different water quality and different levels of knowledge and experience. Just stay alert to changes, and keep up on the care of your tank. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a very bad time with Wood. It helped to kill 2 of my fish and later taking my favorite fish of all time. If its to big it could harbor over time bad bacteria. Sometimes it can lower your Ph. Also some woods will get a white film over them to, not good either.

My opinion, I dont like logs in my tank.

Aw I'm so sorry koko! that's so sad. :( What kind of driftwood did you use? Did you soak it for a long time before?

I've also heard that driftwood goes through like 2 weird/bad stages and then becomes safe for fish use. Have you ever heard of that before?

Oh i soaked it alright. :) It was bog wood.

Also TD had one time the Grapevine Wood, and it was coming apart, and going slimy in there. I dont trust it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I soaked mine as well. Of course others have kept driftwood successfully in their tanks, but I won't be trying it again with goldfish. I like it with tropicals like tetras who like a lower pH anyway, and plecos do love to much on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought two different kinds of driftwood when I set up my tank, and one kind grew this odd bright yellow fuzz so I took it out. But the other kind is still in the tank and it's doing fine, although I do have one complaint--it is *really* hard to clean the algae off of it because it's so knotty. So I think it depends a lot on the kind of wood you get, also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forgot to mention,

If you have another empty tank, that will fit the wood, you can run a filter in it with activated carbon and that will help get rid of the tannins. Just be sure to change the activated carbon often. You can also boil the wood (if you have a pot big enough) to help speed up the process. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always had wood in my tanks with out problems (5 years).

I don't know about "2 weird/bad stages" but wood can release tannins and that will lower your ph. At first the wood may release a larger ammount of tannins, but over time it will slow and your water will stay in the normal range.

Also, some wood will get a white film on it. It does not seem to affect the fish or plants. However I would suggest scrubbing it off when it developes, it looks bad anyway. Like the tannins, it will also go away. I keep bristlenose plecos with my goldfish and they will eat the film so I don't have to scrub it off.

When I add wood, sometimes I soak it, other times I just add it to the tank and watch the PH. For you, I would suggest soaking the wood for a few weeks to a few months, depending on the size and what the PH reads.

Just remember, we all have different ways of fishkeeping. We have to, because we all have different water quality and different levels of knowledge and experience. Just stay alert to changes, and keep up on the care of your tank. :D

Wow lots of stuff to consider! Thank you for posting!

So I just tested my PH. The tank PH was 7.5 and then I tested the water that the driftwood had been soaking in and it read 7.2. Could that drop have killed my fish? And 7.5 is considered hard water, right? Do you have hard water?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep driftwood in my tank... mostly because I really like the look, but also because I have plecos that need it. My large hunk (the only one that's easy to see) is mopani, and I soaked it until it sunk when I brought it home. All my smaller bits are natural driftwood from the Oregon coast collected by some friends years ago before I met them. Those pieces all got a THOROUGH boiling of several hours before going in the tank. I've never had a problem with any of my pieces, but the mopani sometimes grows white fuzz... but my fish seem to think it's an excellent treat, and it hasn't seemed to harm them... so I usually just leave it, unless it gets obnoxiously huge and ugly.

EDIT: Forgot to mention, I also keep some large "coral" rocks in my tank (just the dry kind you can get at petgo or whatever) to help keep my pH up since my water tends to the softer and SLIGHTLY (most of the year) acidic side. These are also partially because I keep snails, and they like to chew on them when they need a little extra calcium for their shell-building.

Edited by The Dragon's Rose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought two different kinds of driftwood when I set up my tank, and one kind grew this odd bright yellow fuzz so I took it out. But the other kind is still in the tank and it's doing fine, although I do have one complaint--it is *really* hard to clean the algae off of it because it's so knotty. So I think it depends a lot on the kind of wood you get, also.

Huh, that's interesting. Do you remember what the two types were?

ow that I think about it, mine may or may not be grapevine. It is very large and I think that it was just thrown in that box instead of the other types because it was the only box it would fit in. It looked like a much harder wood than I remember the other grapevines looking, but then again I am no expert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forgot to mention,

If you have another empty tank, that will fit the wood, you can run a filter in it with activated carbon and that will help get rid of the tannins. Just be sure to change the activated carbon often. You can also boil the wood (if you have a pot big enough) to help speed up the process. :D

Oh very cool! I don't have another tank big enough for it, but I do have some extra carbon kicking around that I can use if I need to. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would anyone be able to recognize the wood if I posted a picture of it up?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't trust driftwood either. Mine kept getting a slimy white film no matter how much I cleaned, which may have been harmless biofilm, but better safe than sorry. Driftwood is beautiful but not a risk I'm willing to take.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would anyone be able to recognize the wood if I posted a picture of it up?

Quite possibly... I'd certainly be willing to give it a go!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep driftwood in my tank... mostly because I really like the look, but also because I have plecos that need it. My large hunk (the only one that's easy to see) is mopani, and I soaked it until it sunk when I brought it home. All my smaller bits are natural driftwood from the Oregon coast collected by some friends years ago before I met them. Those pieces all got a THOROUGH boiling of several hours before going in the tank. I've never had a problem with any of my pieces, but the mopani sometimes grows white fuzz... but my fish seem to think it's an excellent treat, and it hasn't seemed to harm them... so I usually just leave it, unless it gets obnoxiously huge and ugly.

EDIT: Forgot to mention, I also keep some large "coral" rocks in my tank (just the dry kind you can get at petgo or whatever) to help keep my pH up since my water tends to the softer and SLIGHTLY (most of the year) acidic side. These are also partially because I keep snails, and they like to chew on them when they need a little extra calcium for their shell-building.

Haha, goldfish seem think everything is an excellent treat. ;P

But that's very good to know that the white stuff wont kill them. That takes a lot of stress off.

I think if my PH is fine, I'll give it a try. And if I see my fish acting strangely in any way I'll remove it immediately.

And I agree, I LOVE the look of driftwood. I really want to try attaching moss or something to it eventually too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know if the PH drop of 7.5 to 7.2 would have killed my fish?

And okay thank you! I'll go grab my camera. Be right back! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am guessing that whatever you had the wood soaking in is smaller than the tank. In a larger body of water, the change of ph may not have happened as quickly. Thats what you don't want, quick changes. If it is a slow ph change, the fish will adapt, within reason. However, I am not sure how that change in ph would have affected your fish. Also, I don't advise using activated carbon with your fish, that is, if you are using biological filtration.

And I have noticed my goldfish picking at the film too. lol

But yes, lets see some pics.

Edited by Acro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That small of a drop shouldn't have killed your fish in itself.

Edited by Chrissy_Bee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whole thing:

IMG_0522.jpg

This is the color when it's not wet:

IMG_0518.jpg

Some of the rings:

IMG_0521.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I didn't realize all the factors to consider with a PH drop. Thanks for the feedback though. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know what type of wood it is, but it reminds me of a piece of wood I had once. It got bendy after a while. lol Well, not "bendy" but a little flexable. It had just been in the water for a long time. Still held up and the anubias still grew on it.

Post pics with your final tank setup when you can! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing you need to know is what the KH/GH is in your watrer--API makes a drop test for it. The KH/GH is what makes your water hard or soft. If your KH/HG is low, then it is harder to maintain the PH. The PH, itself, does not indicate if your water is hard or soft--rather, it is how acid or alkaline your water is. But, you are more likely to have an issue with your PH if your GH/KH is low (soft water) as then the PH is less stable and more inclined to drop.

I do have driftwood in my tank, but I boiled it repeatedly before putting it in--it was amazing the amount of tannin that came out (much more then soaking), even the 10th time I boiled it. Your piece look quite big, so it you cannot boil it, I'd let it soak covered in water for a good long while--and check the KH/GH before you put in the tank. If you post the KH/Gh results here, we'll be able to tell you if the water is hard or soft. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
  • Create New...