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How can I get my fishes to grow, grow, GROW! ?


pandamanda111

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uhhh about 2 seconds lol. greedy buggers.

Really. How much do you feed and how long do they take to finish? Lol

haha that might be an exaggeration - I sprinkle in tiny pinches at a time (maybe approx 12 pellets?), wait for them to gobble that up, and then add another tiny pinch. I'd say I do this about 4-5 times? this is with Saki Hikari, so each pellet is tiny anyway... I guess overall time is a few minutes, not very long at all!

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The relationship between calorie intake in early life, longevity, and aging is a well-established phenomenon in a wide variety of animals. Animals who receive a diet with much less than normal calories from an early age not only live longer than their normally fed, fat and healthy-looking brethren, but also showed little sign of aging when the others were already senescent. This holds true for worms, fruit flies, and a variety of vertebrates, including fish. We don't know if it applies to humans, since it's very hard to get data on long-lived organisms, but there are people who are staying on very low calorie diets in hop of living longer.

When this effect was first discovered in rodents, back in the 1930s, researchers proposed that slower growth was the cause of the life extension. Now, the most common explanation is hormesis -- improved health as a result of low levels of stress. http://www.springerlink.com/content/c13n34820442744w/

I find it interesting that goldfish who live to very advanced ages are almost always smaller than average. People often say this is because they were stunted by living in a bowl for their first decade. But most pet goldfish lived in a bowl back then. The owners always say that they changed the water every day and were very careful not to overfeed ("We fed one flake a day."). In other words, they practiced calorie restriction.

In Americans, there is an inverse relationship between longevity and body size. That is, those larger than average don't live as long as those who are smaller. I think most people already know that large dogs don't live as long as small dogs. It holds for other animals as well. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1071721/

That said, very few fancy goldfish die of old age, so it's probably OK to push for rapid growth and large size. The technique is many feedings, and many large water changes to get rid of the huge amount of waste produced by overfeeding.

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I don't think age is a direct cause of death at all. But fancy goldfish typically die long before aging could even be considered a factor. A five-year-old goldfish is not old at all, so I wouldn't criticize anyone for trying to produce an oversized fancy goldfish.

Here's another really good reference on the relationship between human size and longevity. http://www.shortsupport.org/Research/Papers/Should%20we%20be%20concerned%2012_12_09.pdf As I expected, "little old lady" and "little old man" is not just a function of shrinking with age. Smaller people live longer. This makes me feel really good, because my son is far shorter than his ancestry indicated he should be. I've blamed myself for this (I should have stuffed the calories in him when he was little!), but now I can take credit for extending his life span, LOL.

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I agree, and I think it's somewhat unrealistic to expect most fancies to live to 10+. I think it's much more reasonable to say 6-8.

Having said that, my oldest fancy was 13, and was a good 10 inches long total. She ate everything that was added to the tank! :o

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The relationship between calorie intake in early life, longevity, and aging is a well-established phenomenon in a wide variety of animals. Animals who receive a diet with much less than normal calories from an early age not only live longer than their normally fed, fat and healthy-looking brethren, but also showed little sign of aging when the others were already senescent. This holds true for worms, fruit flies, and a variety of vertebrates, including fish. We don't know if it applies to humans, since it's very hard to get data on long-lived organisms, but there are people who are staying on very low calorie diets in hop of living longer.

Yep! I know someone who is now on a very restricted calorie diet, the theory being it is much healthier not only because you'll maintain a good body weight, but in terms of longevity as well. I personally do underfeed my goldies by most people's standards. I feed them a small meal once a day and fast them once a week. I didn't always do this, but have for the past couple of years and seemed to have a lot fewer issues (not counting the bacterial problem that came from a new fish, I'm talking in terms of floating, etc.). I don't feed my other pets as much as some would either. My amphibians and reptiles get fed every other day, and not huge meals. All of them are quite old and doing very well. Of course that doesn't prove the theory, but I tend to go toward under, rather than over feeding.

I think a lot of it comes down to your fish keeping aim. Someone who breeds for show wants big, beautiful goldfish fast, whereas someone who just keeps pets may not have the same goals.

Edited by Chrissy_Bee
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We all agree. It's a matter of priorities.

I remember as a graduate student (back in the neolithic period) reading about calorie restriction being the first procedure that could delay aging. To the best of my knowledge (which isn't that great), it remains the only way to delay aging. I'd practice it,but I'm a pig.

Now, if I could just resist "hungry" goldfish ...

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i think that everything depend on the food.that which type of food you are using for the fishes.so that can you tell me that where are you living because in my place there is a special food is available which is in a small balls condition so i think that is more useful for the fishes grow.thanks

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