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Why do people say big water changes are bad?


tithra

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If it's working for you and your fish, you don't have to change.

Careful...because someone could be saying that for them and their 1 gallon bowl :)

I meant that just for Sod, whose wc schedule seems to be working fine. :)

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ive been told no large water changes everywhere BUT kokos.

when i started breeding guppies the babies needed a tank cleaning everyday due to feeding them large amount guppy breeders told me to change 25 percent daily but the tanks stunk so badly i ended up doing 99 percent daily

did i loose quitea few babies? yes i did but i did notice i was looseing LESS adult guppies from stress later on my boyfreind STILL has a few of the guppies i bred 3 years ago and you cannot tell they are at all 3 years old still active and mateing fine.

it also seemed my guppies sufferd LESS from things like fin rot and there fins healed quicker also many peoples fry sufferd from pin tail and i only dealt with one case of pin tail. BUT only the babies i bred the adults i purchused were not as hardy.

on average if one of my males got a torn fin it took about 2 days to have a noticable healing differance while others i talked to would commonly lose the fish entierly

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Hi tithra,

With ur finger method. Do u match temp as close as possible every single bucket? Because what I do is I get the temp as close as possible, but say if first bucket of water feels too warm I compensate by my second bucket being slightly cooler. And do it that way. U think that is ok?

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Hi tithra,

With ur finger method. Do u match temp as close as possible every single bucket? Because what I do is I get the temp as close as possible, but say if first bucket of water feels too warm I compensate by my second bucket being slightly cooler. And do it that way. U think that is ok?

I personally don't use buckets anymore :) I use a water changer that attaches to the sink, it makes water changes so much quicker :) I highly suggest getting one if you're able. Before I start filling up the tank I feel the tank and I feel the tank and match as close as possible. If I was using buckets I would do the same for each bucket. If you get it within 2-3 degrees you are fine. Hopefully those who use buckets will weigh in :)

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Well I am not saying big is wrong, I just find that small frequent changes work for me in my tropical tanks, but then I dont keep waste heavy fish and am a habitual understocker. My planted tanks run with low nits anyway so constantly taking small amounts out seems to work fine for my needs. Like you said - I just stick with whats working :)

Surely also, while removing 10% every other day leaves 90% of the waste in, so doing one huge weekly change leaves 100% in for 6 days in between? I think both methods are a matter of keeping toxins under controlled and harmless levels because if you get into the mathematics of it anything under 100% several times a day is going to be imperfect, and thats beyond most peoples abilities.

I'm not just going to say your opinion is OK, I'm going to agree with you. You and those people who keep kilobuck koi in $50,000 ponds and blanch at the words "water change." Water change fanatics are those who change 10% a day. Standard recommendations are 10% a week for large ponds to 20% a week for small. I read a lot of pond forums, and I've never seen any long-term koi keeper say he was not overstocked. The reasons for hating water changes are that they stress the fish and disrupt the ecosystem. Most have abandoned traditional water changes for "trickle-in trickle-out" systems where a steady supply of new water trickles in the the pond and an overflow somewhere in the system removes water. This is the ultimate in small frequent water changes. Comparisons

I bolded your statement about weekly changes, because while it's not true that the concentration of of some chemical is 100% for 6 days, if one does a 70% water change once a week, for 6 days the concentration rises from 30% of max to 100% of max, and on the 7th it drops abruptly to 30%. If you change 10% a day, you will get a small daily fluctuation somewhere in between. If you use a continuous trickle, you will have a steady state concentration. That is, you would have these effects if water change was the only way of reducing the concentration of that chemical.

However, for every substance produced by an organism, there are other organisms (mainly microorganisms) who will make use of that substance. The way you grow those organisms is to feed them, so you use ammonia to grow nitrifying bacteria. Ideally, you keep the concentration low enough to not be toxic, but high enough to grow whatever eats it.

I'm not saying there is something wrong with maintaining water quality with large water changes. It's a matter of choice. It can work well, but other things work too.

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