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lenacara

Food and health

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Hey guys,

I know I haven’t been on here in a couple of months but my fish are starting to act weird so I thought I would get your opinion. I currently have 4 comets and 1 oranda. My black moor passed away last week with no warning. They are currently in a 75 gallon tank that has been set up for over a year. I checked the water parameters and everything seems fine and I change 75% of the water weekly so that tends to stay good.

The question is weather you think their diet could be making them sick. The oranda can’t have anything but jell food made out of peas and green beans. Since I don’t have room for another tank, I have to have them all together. I have tried feeding everything including spirulina flakes and the oranda ends up stuck at the top of the water struggling to get down. So I’m wondering if the lack of protein can end up hurting the comets. My favorite one that is about 4 inches long has just been hanging out at the bottom a lot. He doesn’t have clamped fins and nothing looks strange about him, he just isn’t as perky. I gave them actual fish food last night (Hikari fancy goldfish) and this morning he looked much better. Is it better to feed them the good stuff once a week and let the oranda suffer or do you think it’s a different problem?

Thanks,

Carmen

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check this out

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/94503-in-support-of-agar-agar/

I do think they need more protein in any case. have you tried frozen foods like krill? or bloodworms?

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Yes, frozen bloodworms is an excellent idea. Also, since it is only the oranda who is suffering from floatiness, have you considered floating him/her in a collander at meal times so that you can feed him his special diet while still being able to feed the others regular food?

In addition, how much food are you feeding at each time? Too much food at any one time can also cause floatiness.

Finally, definitely check out the link Captain Findus Goldfish provided. :)

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I have tried frozen foods and I get the same result. I haven't tried agar agar though. That may work. The first batch I made did have some regular fish food in it, I thought having just a bit would be fine but Fernando wouldn't have it. Is it possible that orandas need less proteins that Comets? I do have a 20 galon for my betta that I could put the oranda in and just drastically downsize the betta but Charlie loves his home and I always feel bad when I see fish in tiny little tanks.

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I think you can leave the fish where they are and just make separate accommodations at feeding times.

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I may try the colender idea. Is it pretty easy to catch them? I've never tried it and my tank is kinda huge. Cleaning time usually involves a chair since I'm short. Could I just do it in a large fish net? I have a canopy thing on top and it makes it hard to get big things into the tank. I think getting a colender in there would involve taking the top apart.

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if it involves stressing the fish, it usually is a bad idea. I would consider improving the oranda's diet too.

how about your tank set up? can we have a picture? it could be that you have some bad bacteria lurking somewhere

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Prussian and Crucian carp, the carp that goldfish were bred from, quite often live on pure vegetarian diets in the wild when insects and worms are scarce, particularly during the Winter. There's plenty of amino acids goldfish can use in vegetables to convert to protein.

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Here's a link to a PDF describing what was found in the intestines of Prussian carp, the ancestors to the modern goldfish. The contents were analyzed in spring and summer, and their diets were indeed quite varied, ranging from diatoms to cyanobacteria to worms and copepods etc.

http://www.bio.u-szeged.hu/ecology/tiscia/t22/t_22_9.pdf

Edited by dnalex

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Here's a link to a PDF describing what was found in the intestines of Prussian carp, the ancestors to the modern goldfish. The contents were analyzed in spring and summer, and their diets were indeed quite varied, ranging from diatoms to cyanobacteria to worms and copepods etc.

http://www.bio.u-sze.../t22/t_22_9.pdf

Very interesting!

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