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Smurfishy

Fry Questions

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I have just a few questions. I have been keeping my fry in a net for some time. There are either 16 or 18 of them. I just took half of the biggest ones out with my 3' fantail. They are about an inch or less long comets maybe some commons. Must I resort to siphoning into buckets to secure no fry gets left behind, lol, or netting into a bowl?

When does the 10g per fish rule start to go into effect?

These are the offspring of a white comet female, an almost all orange comet with white tipped tail male and two light orange commons. Most of the fish seem to be comets if not all. One finally got color and right now seems to hava a yellow body with a black stripe down its back, what are the odds of this fish or others having black coloring? What are the odds of other color variations? Also their tail shapes vary. Some are very vertical reaching very high and low, others have long tails that seem to reach not up or down but directly behind them. Anything to this?

Some seem to have slightly missplaced tales that are just slightly to the left or right, will this hurt them in time?

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As a previous fish breeder I personally didn't follow the stocking rules. I don't know of a breed that does. The tanks are stocked pretty heavy with just a sponge filter. You will want to do lots of water changes. A minimum of one 100% water change a day. This will keep your levels at zero and allow for maximum growth. I used aged heated water.

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Well, the 10-20 gallons per fish rule is usually for adult fish, but since you won't want to buy a new tank every few months it is easier and cheaper to start out with the biggest container you will need. The smaller the container, the more frequent you will have to do water changes.

The imperfect tails should not be a problem. If the fish can get around fine, that's all that counts, unless you want to go for quality standards.

Finny, one of my single tail fry was "born" without a tail at all. Not just without tail fins, a small part of the "body tail" is also missing. Yet s/he is the biggest and fattest out of the four fry, has no problem swimming around although s/he looks a bit funny, wiggling like a ranchu.

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My 25g that they are in is doing well, I test atleast once a week and the levels are not off. I have a 75g that I am fishless cycling and a spare 40g breeder as well that if need be I will move my filters from the 25g. Oh please don't have me doing 100% w/c everyday!

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In a 25g at 1 inch per fish they should be fine for a little while. What are you planning to do with all these fish? You will have to start making plans if you don't have any yet. The best choice would be to re home the majority, since 16-18 single tails is a lot of tank or work. Unless you have a really big pond :)

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when are they considered adults? I was planning on keeping very few if any. wouldnt I need like 20+g per comet? that would be like nearly 400g! I saw ur pics of the tailess wonder awhile back, he is cute and I am glad you decided to keep him!

Well, the 10-20 gallons per fish rule is usually for adult fish, but since you won't want to buy a new tank every few months it is easier and cheaper to start out with the biggest container you will need. The smaller the container, the more frequent you will have to do water changes.

The imperfect tails should not be a problem. If the fish can get around fine, that's all that counts, unless you want to go for quality standards.

Finny, one of my single tail fry was "born" without a tail at all. Not just without tail fins, a small part of the "body tail" is also missing. Yet s/he is the biggest and fattest out of the four fry, has no problem swimming around although s/he looks a bit funny, wiggling like a ranchu.

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yeah, I need to put up another CL ad. Any suggestions on how to find them homes that will be good and not use them as feeders?

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Its summer so you could advertise them as pond fish.

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I agree with Chris. Advertise them as (baby) pond fish. Arrange with the future owner that you can check out his or her setup before giving them the fish. Just let them know you care about the fish and want to make sure they don't end up as free food for a carnivore.

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Ok, will do, ty!

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How are the fry doing? :) I have some more answers for you, since no one seemed to address all of them.

Goldfish genetics is a very tricky thing, but I will try my best to share with you what I have learned (as a result of research, talking with other breeders, and experience of my own :) )

These are the offspring of a white comet female, an almost all orange comet with white tipped tail male and two light orange commons. Most of the fish seem to be comets if not all. One finally got color and right now seems to hava a yellow body with a black stripe down its back, what are the odds of this fish or others having black coloring?

Not very likely at all. Black is not a color (generally) that will pop out of no where to stay. It is possible that you have the non-calico offspring of a shubunkin mating, but even so, it's very unlikely that any of the fry will have back coloration.

What you are seeing is called the "fry color" and it usually disappears within the first 6mos of life.

What are the odds of other color variations?

If I were to hazard a guess I would say that most, if not all, of the fry will end up mostly red (some white portions) of varying colors. Red is the technical term for the orange color of goldfish and it can vary from a deep cherry red to light yellow or even what some people call "lemon" which is a very very pale yellow. But it's all the same xanthic pigment found in the skin, so it's all called red (even though, technically it all shades of yellow...Don't ask me! I didn't make it up!!)

Also their tail shapes vary. Some are very vertical reaching very high and low, others have long tails that seem to reach not up or down but directly behind them. Anything to this?

The ones with the high set ("set" is the term goldfish breeders use for vertical orientation, "spread" is horizontal (which doesn't pertain to you, since you have single tails)) will most likely end up as the ones that can be classified as "comet" goldfish. The lower set tails will be commons. Of course, length plays into the classification of the tail as well, but in general I would say that the higher the tail the more likely it is that it will be a comet.

Phew...that was a lot. Hope it helped shed a little light on your questions. Let me know if you have more! I LOVE talking about goldfish breeding and genetics!

:)

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