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What Do You Supose Would Happen If...


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  • Regular Member

"* Compact, submersible pond filtration system

* Built-in UV clarifier enhances pond water clarity

* Easy-to-install pond filter includes water fountain kit

Keep your pond looking its best in just one simple step. Install the Crystal-Flo Complete Pond Filter System and enjoy the benefits of a mechanical and biological pond filter, a UV (ultraviolet) clarifier AND a beautiful water fountain kit. Compact, submersible filter requires no complicated plumbing for dramatically simple filter installation. Built-in UV clarifier enhances pond water clarity by combating green water algae for beautiful, crystal clear water. The Crystal-Flo Complete Pond Filter System measures 16-1/2" x 13-3/4" x 6" high and is ideal for ponds between 500 and 1,000 gallons. "

no one have any ideas or opinions?

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I'm no expert but that sounds rather large, what gph is that? I'd worry about the current, plus if you've got one large filter as opposed to a few smaller ones, the amount of splash/water displacement at the output would be quite extreme wouldn't it?

Also, I don't quite know how these pond ones work, as it's submersible would the whole lot go in the tank? Again if so the water displacement means your 80gal probably wouldn't be 80gal anymore...?

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Sounds like snake oil to me. It might work for a 100 gallon pond, or for your aquarium (if you want to use all of that space), but there isn't enough room in that thing for adequate biofiltration for a 500 gallon pond, let alone 1000 gallons. When they make such outrageous claims, I wouldn't believe anything they say.

The problem with a submersible pond filter in an aquarium is that if it's big enough to do the job it will be huge and unsightly.

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You will always have to do weekly water changes in your tank, no matter the gph. There will be nitrate built up which is normally only removed by water changes.

Same with the stunting hormone which will build up and stunt your fish.

So "normal" aquarium filters and weekly water changes are definitely the better idea :) The only way to decrease the number of water changes would be by offering much more water volume, to dilute the nitrate and hormone a lot. Like if you had 30 gallons of water per fancy, then you probably could get away with bi-monthly water changes.

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