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Can I Have A Pond In The Up?


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People have ponds in Alberta, so you can certainly have one in the UP. You should have your pond deeper than the frost line. As long as the pond doesn't freeze to the bottom, the fish will "sleep" away the winter in the cold water at the bottom. Most people try to keep an open hole for gas exchange, pumping a hard stream of water at a spot at the top of the pond. But have seen others say that they don't do a thing. Some people build a structure over their ponds to keep the pond warmer. These can work, and can also collapse in heavy snow.

Four feet is probably deep enough. If you don't want your whole pond to be so deep, you can make it three feet deep except for a "hibernation hole" in the center that is 5 feet deep. If you are going to keep koi, your pond should be at least 3 feet deep anyway. Also, a 3 foot deep pond makes it impossible for a great blue heron to stand on the bottom and feast on your fishies.

Many people in cold climates build a winter pond in the basement. That way they can enjoy their fish all year around.

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another question my boyfreinds parents own a lot across the street were we would want the pond to go its got a stream running thru it what we had thought about was building a very large pond atleast 35 feet by 35 feet since its a large lot and we have the whole thing to work with but my question is if we created the pond so its fed by the stream would we need a filter?

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Well i just wanted to say i live in northern Alberta and have a pond. But i bring my fish in for the winter since my pond is small. My neighbor has a gue pond, probably at least 10 feet deep and they keep trout in it year round so I'm sure you could keep koi in it year round too. I would just be too scared since I love my babies too much :) I always wanted to do like some people do and build a big greenhouse around the pond (if I had a bigger pond) to keep it warmer in winter. Then i would leave my fish out

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I'm pretty sure it would be illegal to build a pond as a part of a natural stream particularly to put in non-native fish. I know in WI you can't modify a natural stream in any way without permission from the conservation department, and you have to prove that you are not altering the ecosystem to get that permission. I suspect MI laws are similar.

I think you had better do some checking.

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I also don't know anything about ponds... but it depends on the fish as well, doesn't it? You want to make sure you get fish that can hibernate and withstand cold while hibernating. Even if you have a deep pond, if you get a fish who can't survive in temps less than 60, then... well, there would be no point xD

I'm probably just making myself sound like a fool, though. Sorry -sigh- Just trying to give some helpful input.

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Nothing foolish there, Emyline. That's why certain goldfish are designated "pond fish." They can thrive in a pond, year around, with any other kind of goldfish or with koi. These include commons, comets, shubunkin, wakin, and watonai, and a few other types that are rare in the US. Of course, all goldfish do better in ponds than in aquariums, but the more delicate types need some special accommodations, can't handle cold, and may need to be kept with their own kind even in good weather. Fantails are "borderline pond fish." Some people successfully keep them in the pond year around, under ice, while others say they have lost them in winter ponds and bring them in for the winter. In above-freezing weather, they are fine with any other pond goldfish.

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This might be completely impracticable for a normal person but I wonder if there is theoretically a way to heat the tank during the winter. Not to keep it at 70F of course, but to keep it from completely freezing over. Like having several heaters somewhere in the filter box so the filtered water that splashes back in (if you have a fountain thingy) would keep part of the surface defrosted and the overall tank temperature a little bit warmer.

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Here are some threads describing winter shelters people have built for their ponds. A sturdy one can keep water open in very cold climates.

One link.

Another.

There are stock tank heaters designed to keep the water open for animals to drink, but heating water outside in the winter is expensive.

One device that might make a shelter more effective is a solar pool cover. We float them on swimming pools in FL to keep the water warmer in the winter.

Edited by shakaho
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This might be completely impracticable for a normal person but I wonder if there is theoretically a way to heat the tank during the winter. Not to keep it at 70F of course, but to keep it from completely freezing over. Like having several heaters somewhere in the filter box so the filtered water that splashes back in (if you have a fountain thingy) would keep part of the surface defrosted and the overall tank temperature a little bit warmer.

There are some people who do this. Certainly, not to keep the temp in the 70s, but in the 50s.

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