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Cerisa

The Thing About Agar Agar

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After making a batch of gel food, I looked at the ingredients of the gelatin box and it said it only has carraggenan aka agar agar in it. So I searched the internet, clicked a link and it had very, very angry people getting intestinal problems, allergies and similar symptoms from consuming food that has MSG. (Both are from seaweed, btw.)

I can't write properly to save my life so here are some info lifted from this website.

Carrageenan is a gel. It coats the insides of a stomach,

like gooey honey or massage oil. Digestive problems often

ensue. Quite often, soy eaters or soymilk drinkers react

negatively to carrageenen, and blame their discomforting

stomachaches on the soy.

It'd be nice to know your say about this. Sorry if I sound standoffish, I'm more of a lurker. :unsure:

Edited by Cerisa

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It coats the insides of a stomach,

I doubt that since agar agar is vegan. So therefore has nothing to do with anything animal.

Wiki Agar

Gelatin Ingredients

Collagen is one of the chief ingredients of gelatin. Collagen is a scleroprotein found in the bone, cartilage and tendons of animals. When the bones or tissues of animals are boiled, collagen yields gelatin. Hence, getting straight to the point, you should know that gelatin can be obtained only from animal tissues. There is a wide spread misconception that gelatin is obtained from horse hooves, which is incorrect. Horse hooves or bones are never used in the production process of gelatin. Tissues of pigs, cattle and fish are prominently used in order to obtain gelatin.

Vegan Gelatin

Vegans may be disappointed to find that gelatin used in their favorite desserts is obtained from an animal source and hence, cannot be consumed. One should also know that no such product as the vegan gelatin exists. However, one may not be aware but, there are various substances that have similar properties like that of gelatin and can be used as a substitute to it. Agar agar, or only the agar, is a widely used vegan substitute for gelatin. Agar is obtained from seaweed or red algae and is used as an ingredient in many vegan desserts all over the world. Agar is obtained by boiling, purifying and drying red algae or red seaweed. The properties of agar are not exactly similar to that of gelatin, as it is more slimy and softer than gelatin. But nonetheless, it makes an excellent gelling agent in vegan marshmallows and jellies. Some of the other vegan substitutes for gelatin include Xanthan, Biobin, Guar and Carob fruit.

Personally I prefer, and find more natural, to feed the goldfish seaweed rather than slaughterhouse by products.

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It coats the insides of a stomach,

I doubt that since agar agar is vegan. So therefore has nothing to do with anything animal.

Wiki Agar

Gelatin Ingredients

Collagen is one of the chief ingredients of gelatin. Collagen is a scleroprotein found in the bone, cartilage and tendons of animals. When the bones or tissues of animals are boiled, collagen yields gelatin. Hence, getting straight to the point, you should know that gelatin can be obtained only from animal tissues. There is a wide spread misconception that gelatin is obtained from horse hooves, which is incorrect. Horse hooves or bones are never used in the production process of gelatin. Tissues of pigs, cattle and fish are prominently used in order to obtain gelatin.

Vegan Gelatin

Vegans may be disappointed to find that gelatin used in their favorite desserts is obtained from an animal source and hence, cannot be consumed. One should also know that no such product as the vegan gelatin exists. However, one may not be aware but, there are various substances that have similar properties like that of gelatin and can be used as a substitute to it. Agar agar, or only the agar, is a widely used vegan substitute for gelatin. Agar is obtained from seaweed or red algae and is used as an ingredient in many vegan desserts all over the world. Agar is obtained by boiling, purifying and drying red algae or red seaweed. The properties of agar are not exactly similar to that of gelatin, as it is more slimy and softer than gelatin. But nonetheless, it makes an excellent gelling agent in vegan marshmallows and jellies. Some of the other vegan substitutes for gelatin include Xanthan, Biobin, Guar and Carob fruit.

Personally I prefer, and find more natural, to feed the goldfish seaweed rather than slaughterhouse by products.

It's not really for us to eat in the first place so I really agree with you there.

But there were actually warnings about this in pet food but then again it could be actually safe for the fish since their gut is better suited for it.

Thanks for your input. c:

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But are you saying that MSG is in AGar Agar? I find that odd. Here I only find Agar Agar in health food stores... hmmmm.. :hmm

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MSG isn't in Agar Agar to my knowledge. Nothing is added. It is an all natural vegan product.

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Carrageenan is similar to, but not the same as agar agar. They are two thickening/gelling agents. Both made from seaweed, but different seaweeds.

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Carrageenan is NOT agar. Both are thickening agents, both come from seaweed (not the same kind) but they have different properties. Agar is used by every microbiologist to make semisolid (gel) media for growing bacteria. The reason agar is so useful, is that it is not digested by most bacteria (or any higher organism) so the media remains firm while the bacteria grow in nice colonies. It is non-nutritive to humans, meaning it goes right through the digestive tract like fiber.

Agar is a purified product. It doesn't contain any MSG, nor have any of the anti-MSG articles that I have seen claimed that it does. Carrageenan is more of a food product, and it may contain naturally occurring MSG. MSG is a sodium salt of an amino acid, and occurs naturally in meats, dairy products, tomatoes, mushrooms, anything fermented, etc.

You can find candies made with agar. They're not as sticky as the usual jelly candies. I like them a lot better. Here's a recipe for vegan gummy worms made with agar. :D

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