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How Can I Get My Feeders To Put On Weight?


Kerstin

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Hi there,

about a month ago I got two 1 1/2 inch or smaller feeders. They are still really skinny and don't seem to put on any weight. I'm feeding them the Goldfishconnection flakes (they wont touch anything that is on the ground so sinking pellets will just lie there), freeze dried brine shrimp, frozen blood worms (which they are not keen on) and salad, which they wont touch.

Any idea on what else I could feed them to make them a little fatter?

Any help would be appreciated.

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Stop with the flakes and try a variety of foods such as sinking pellets, and fresh frozen foods such as bloodworms and brine shrimp. As they're young they need to be fed multiple meals daily at least 3-4 times a day, (But smaller meals) This allows for efficient digestion. They will learn to eat what's provided ,they probably don't recognize the food source. They'll learn and they will eat what's given to them ;)

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I agree you have to be firm and get them used to sinking more substantial food. Krill I swear works well as does occasional feeds of soft white rice for fattening up.

Also, if you are still cycling they wont gain weight until that is sorted. If you just finished cycling you should now see them start to gain a bit as stressors disappear.

Pics of your new babies please! :angelstaf:

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they sound like picky guys :)

have you tried the spirulina flakes from GC? My crew is addicted to those! otherwise I guess gel food would be super healthy :)

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Yes, they will eventually learn that they can eat those things. Boiled egg white would be a great source for protein. If you serve it by "shredding/scratching" over the cooked egg white with your finger nail to get little "flakes" of egg white - that stuff will even stay on the surface for a while if you just sprinkle it on. They might eat that!

Another thing to make them eat the sinking pellets: most goldfish love the flavor of garlic. So if you have fresh garlic at home, crush a clove, put it in a small microwavable dish with a teaspoon full of (tank) water, heat it up a little bit in the microwave, then soak the pellets in the garlic water for a couple minutes before you feed them.

And then just leave the pellets in the tank for a while, even if they don't eat them right away.

Mine eat almost everything that is garlic-y. Crushing a clove or cutting it in half and rubbing it over lettuce, spinach and all sort of other veggies makes them go nuts for it. The only thing they still won't eat is carrots. Mine hate carrots LOL

I hope this works! :)

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Thanks for your input everyone. I'll definitely try all the suggestions. Maybe it's time to try making some gel food :)

I bought some Hikari goldfish mini pellets. Of course they don't like them, but the bigger one at least tried them, just to spit them back out. I think even though they are mini pellets they might be too big for little Neptune. It says for gold fish 1 1/2 inch and over, but he is I think about a little over an inch if that.

I also got some freeze dried Krill, which my two big guys really enjoyed, but I haven't tried it for the little ones yet. I'll do that after they get over the "shock" of being served pellets for lunch.lol

@ Trinket. So nice to see you back online. Glad everyone is ok :)

The tank is cycled, eventhough it did take almost three weeks despite using media from my old tank. No clue what went wrong there. I was expecting an almost instant cycle ,but no such luck.

Should I maybe try the Jump Start food from GC? I was planning on buying some Pro Gold anyways...

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I would try a variety of frozen food. Don't feed them at all for a couple days and then some blood worms or daphnia. Or a few pellets, and don't give them anything else until they eat it OR until you have to remove it after six hours.

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I have 1 common/comet in a 30 gal by himself that I've been feeding Tetra tropical color enhancing flakes. I had this big jar that needed to be used up and the ingredients are pratically the same as the gf flakes. Anyway, since I have done this my gf has really grown and his color is in fact darker and more vibrant. It took maybe a month or so to start noticing a difference but he looks great and is acting perfectly normal. I have had him close to a year now and am so pleased with the way he is turning out. So, I'm sorry but don't really see why they can't be fed flakes. I'm sure it's better to serve sinking pellets to fancies but the commons can handle the flakes in my experience. I actually had one die from an allergic reaction to bloodworms, but I do feed shrimp and peas on occasion as well.

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I'm not sure why some people think that flakes are nutritionally inferior to pellets. I looked at the labels of flakes and pellets of the same brand and saw nearly identical ingredients, and nutritional analyses that differed mainly in that the flakes had slightly more protein. The big difference was that, per unit weight, the flakes were much more expensive.

The most effective way to get a goldfish to eat a different food is to put a fish that does eat that food in the same tank. It's about impossible for a goldie to let another get all of any food.

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I'm not sure why some people think that flakes are nutritionally inferior to pellets. I looked at the labels of flakes and pellets of the same brand and saw nearly identical ingredients, and nutritional analyses that differed mainly in that the flakes had slightly more protein. The big difference was that, per unit weight, the flakes were much more expensive.

The most effective way to get a goldfish to eat a different food is to put a fish that does eat that food in the same tank. It's about impossible for a goldie to let another get all of any food.

I took the following passage from the NLS website, which makes both flakes & pellets:

Pellets are preferred over flakes due to the fact that they are more nutrient dense, and much more stable in water. For species of fish over 2-3 inches, pellets are clearly the most optimum method of providing nutrition to your fish. Not only can you feed much less on a volume basis, but pellets will also remain stable in the aquarium for an extended period of time.

By their very design, flake foods are paper-thin; absorb water very quickly, and while doing so leach out much of the water-soluble vitamins in a very short period. Some studies suggest that once flakes are added to the aquarium, the majority of water-soluble vitamins (such as vitamin C) are leached out of a flake food within 60-90 seconds.

This information has been common knowledge in the aquaculture circles for several decades, yet some hobbyists seem to be stuck using outdated and less than ideal methods for feeding their aquarium raised fish. Using pellet food for all feed applications is yet another concept that has been proven in commercial aquaculture since its inception.

Link: http://nlsfishfood.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=29&Itemid=63&limit=1&limitstart=6

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I'm not sure why some people think that flakes are nutritionally inferior to pellets. I looked at the labels of flakes and pellets of the same brand and saw nearly identical ingredients, and nutritional analyses that differed mainly in that the flakes had slightly more protein. The big difference was that, per unit weight, the flakes were much more expensive.

The most effective way to get a goldfish to eat a different food is to put a fish that does eat that food in the same tank. It's about impossible for a goldie to let another get all of any food.

I took the following passage from the NLS website, which makes both flakes & pellets:

Pellets are preferred over flakes due to the fact that they are more nutrient dense, and much more stable in water. For species of fish over 2-3 inches, pellets are clearly the most optimum method of providing nutrition to your fish. Not only can you feed much less on a volume basis, but pellets will also remain stable in the aquarium for an extended period of time.

By their very design, flake foods are paper-thin; absorb water very quickly, and while doing so leach out much of the water-soluble vitamins in a very short period. Some studies suggest that once flakes are added to the aquarium, the majority of water-soluble vitamins (such as vitamin C) are leached out of a flake food within 60-90 seconds.

This information has been common knowledge in the aquaculture circles for several decades, yet some hobbyists seem to be stuck using outdated and less than ideal methods for feeding their aquarium raised fish. Using pellet food for all feed applications is yet another concept that has been proven in commercial aquaculture since its inception.

Link: http://nlsfishfood.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=29&Itemid=63&limit=1&limitstart=6

That's an interesting article.

For some reason the flakes I got at goldfish connection seem to be much more "stable" for lack of a better word, less flimsy and my big guys really thrived on them. Also your article says "for fish over 2-3 inches". Seems like my little guy who is about an inch and a bit still has trouble eating the Pellets...

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That's an interesting article.

For some reason the flakes I got at goldfish connection seem to be much more "stable" for lack of a better word, less flimsy and my big guys really thrived on them. Also your article says "for fish over 2-3 inches". Seems like my little guy who is about an inch and a bit still has trouble eating the Pellets...

I have two tanks, one with full-grown fish and the other with all really small ones from 1-2 inches. I've always fed them pellets, gel food, and frozen things, and they've never had any dislike of them since day 1. I wonder if you could help them make the transition, by going from flakes to floating pellets and then to sinking pellets. In the mean time, how many times are you feeding them? Young fish need to be fed small amounts but multiple times each day. You just have to monitor your water quality carefully if you do so. :)

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That's an interesting article.

For some reason the flakes I got at goldfish connection seem to be much more "stable" for lack of a better word, less flimsy and my big guys really thrived on them. Also your article says "for fish over 2-3 inches". Seems like my little guy who is about an inch and a bit still has trouble eating the Pellets...

I have two tanks, one with full-grown fish and the other with all really small ones from 1-2 inches. I've always fed them pellets, gel food, and frozen things, and they've never had any dislike of them since day 1. I wonder if you could help them make the transition, by going from flakes to floating pellets and then to sinking pellets. In the mean time, how many times are you feeding them? Young fish need to be fed small amounts but multiple times each day. You just have to monitor your water quality carefully if you do so. :)

I feed them like 3 or four times a day. And clean the gravel once every two days, just to make sure. I really want them to get used to the floating kind of pellet, because that's what I feed the guys in the pond, where they are supposed to go once they grow a little bit... I think I'll try the idea of soaking some in some garlic juice... :)

Which pellets do you feed the little guys?

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Which pellets do you feed the little guys?

I use the NLS Thera-A 1 mm sinking pellets. It's already full of garlic lol. They kinda go into a frenzy when I drop this into the tank :)

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Which pellets do you feed the little guys?

I use the NLS Thera-A 1 mm sinking pellets. It's already full of garlic lol. They kinda go into a frenzy when I drop this into the tank :)

Thanks. I'll have to check those out. :)

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There are already lots of great suggestions here, but I'll just add one more thought.

I've had some pretty small fish before, and one other thing you can try with the pellets is crushing them. I tried those Hakari mini pellets before and had fish spit them out, but if I crushed them into smaller pieces with the back of a spoon, the fish would manage to eat them up.

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There are already lots of great suggestions here, but I'll just add one more thought.

I've had some pretty small fish before, and one other thing you can try with the pellets is crushing them. I tried those Hakari mini pellets before and had fish spit them out, but if I crushed them into smaller pieces with the back of a spoon, the fish would manage to eat them up.

Thanks Cometgirl. I'll try that right now. :)

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