Jump to content

Omg - That Was Horrible


Mumzilla

Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

So my daughter brought her betta home from college at Thanksgiving because he had a fungus on his mouth. We salted and did water changes and it seemed better. Then he shed his entire slime coat and just sat on the bottom. We kept up with the water changes and he was eating and seemed ok til a week ago when he was just so lethargic and pitiful looking. I saw he was pineconing last night so I decided to use the clove oil today. I mixed it per the directions and it was one of the worst experiences of my life. He struggled and tried to jump out and thrashed and was in HUGE distress. I had to cover the container and leave the room in tears. He was gone when I checked back 10 minutes later, but I will NEVER use that method again. It was truly horrific and I am still sick to stomach. :cry1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Oh gosh,I am so sorrycry3.gifheartpump.gif I had a similar experience w/ 1 of my gf and clove oil-he struggled,and I could not get the image out of my mind for a loooooong time and my stomach absolutely wrenchedsad.gif it was very hard-and I don't know what the alternative would be. I know some people mix vodka w/ the c/o,but that seems like it would be very harsh on the gills,to me. I have yet to hear of a perfect methodidont.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I'm so sorry you had a bad experience like that. :hug I've had to use the clove oil/vodka method two or three times over the years and it always went very well. It is always hard to do but every time the fish went very peacefully. I wonder if your betta reacted because he had lost his slimecoat and the clove oil burned his skin? Anyways I'm very sorry. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I used grapefruit seed extract... sounds weird but in small doses it could be used to treat the bacterial infection, it worked a little but my betta was too far gone so I increased the dose and he was gone quickly.. However it was essentially a gradual thing, since there was already some in the water.. So sorry that you had to experience that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I'm so sorry to hear that it went badly :(

I don't know what happened. I've used clove oil a few times and it was always instant death. It's actually what a lot of biologists use when preforming surgery on fish. Maybe it has something to do with the slime coat being gone, as someone suggested.

I am pretty sure if I ever have to do it again, I will have my hubby cut their head off. I couldn't do it, but he is much more practical than I.

That really is the best way to go, it's just that most of us don't have it in us to do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

This post really got me thinking...and digging. I've been doing some research on clove oil.

One article makes a lot of great points about the differences between fish species. I suspected the betta's reaction may have had something to do with him being a labyrinth fish - they can breath air through their mouths. Here's a quote from the paper:

Responding to confinement or hypoxic anesthetic baths, the latter (air breathing fish) pull air from the water surface and reduce or temporarily stop opercular movement, and the decreased branchial contact with the water results in a slower rate of anesthetic uptake (Hseu et al. 1997). For this reason injectable anesthetics are useful in species capable of aerial respiration (Bruecker and Graham 1993)

Here's a link to the article http://dels-old.nas.edu/ilar_n/ilarjournal/50_4/pdfs/v5004Neiffer.pdf

Maybe immersion is not the best way to put a betta to sleep....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Supporter

Oh I'm so sorry to hear that you had such an awful experience. It's hard enough to have to go through the event of putting a loved pet to sleep and then to have it go wrong only makes it that much worse. I can only imagine how you must feel. I'm sending you many positive thoughts and hugs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
I had to cover the container and leave the room in tears. He was gone when I checked back 10 minutes later, but I will NEVER use that method again. It was truly horrific and I am still sick to stomach. :cry1

:hug

Ohhh that sounds so so sad. I am soooooo sorry you had to watch that! I've never had to use it. I almost used it on my fish about a month ago and she died on her own the same day I was going to euthanize. I am so glad because I don't like being the one to make decisions and I was always scared about something going wrong..

I know its probably hard to remember right now, but you did it with good intentions and with the bettas best interest at heart. I know it didn't go as planned but you did it out of love and trying to end suffering, so you still did a good thing...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Aww :( You poor thing i am so sorry you had to go through that :( I think i will use my hubby to cut off the fish's head as he is a fisherman and can do it quite quick...I don't think i could do that (kill my fish) myself persoally :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Thanks for the heads up. I tend to go with a hospice tank for dying fish. It's exactly what it sounds like, make a dying fish comfortable. For a dying betta, this means very shallow water so the dying betta can breath better.I was thinking of going with clove oil sometime.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

This post really got me thinking...and digging. I've been doing some research on clove oil.

One article makes a lot of great points about the differences between fish species. I suspected the betta's reaction may have had something to do with him being a labyrinth fish - they can breath air through their mouths. Here's a quote from the paper:

Responding to confinement or hypoxic anesthetic baths, the latter (air breathing fish) pull air from the water surface and reduce or temporarily stop opercular movement, and the decreased branchial contact with the water results in a slower rate of anesthetic uptake (Hseu et al. 1997). For this reason injectable anesthetics are useful in species capable of aerial respiration (Bruecker and Graham 1993)

Here's a link to the article http://dels-old.nas....5004Neiffer.pdf

Maybe immersion is not the best way to put a betta to sleep....

So for goldfish it should be *safe* to use, I think.

But I think when I have to put a fish to sleep I'll call a vet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I reallydo think it's safe for goldfish Miki. I haven't found anything that states otherwise and I've had nothing but good results with it.

I agree, but I think I am to much of a chicken to do it myself :unsure:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Thanks for the warm hugs and kind words. I was wondering about the betta thing and being a surface breather. It was so awful tho that I will not attempt it again. Hopefully I won't have to. The only consolation is that he was suffering and dying slowly and this sped it up and ended the slow death.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Poor fish. I'm sorry that he had to suffer like that, mashallah his suffering is ended now.

If I ever had to euthanize my fish, I wouldn't use any poisoning method- it seems to slow and unreliable. I'd probably use decapitation. I've done it with food fish and it seems to kill them very quickly. Done right, the poor thing doesn't even get a chance to thrash.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...