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Qt Time For Feeder Fish


Kerstin

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Hi there,

we're finally starting on our garden pond, which may be be in the works for a while, but at least we got started. :D

Anyway I was thinking of putting 3 feeder fish in there as "first fish" and then later once I'm more experienced get a couple of watonai and a squeaky yellow comet from raingarden.

My question is, I want to make sure the feeders are healthy before I put them in the pond. How long should I qt them for and should I prazi them?

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You should at least quarantine them from a month especially because of the places they're coming from. I would work on cycling the pond first and just getting 'feeders' from Steve at raingarden. His 'feeders' are the hibuna on there. They'd be much more apt to survive I think.

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You should at least quarantine them from a month especially because of the places they're coming from. I would work on cycling the pond first and just getting 'feeders' from Steve at raingarden. His 'feeders' are the hibuna on there. They'd be much more apt to survive I think.

So the fishless cycle works for ponds, too? Steve's Hibunas are really pretty. I just want all his fish. Always have a few favorites picked out already.

For some reason I always feel bad for the feeder fish at the pet store, so I'd like to at least try and give 2 of them a chance...

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I don't see much point in quarantining if you get the fish from the same source.

If it were me, it would depend on your income and the possibility of predators getting the goldies to get fancier mail order goldies.

At my old community garden, a heron ate a lot of goldfish. Would hate for those to be expensive mail order goldies.

Edited by Au-fish
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That's also a very good point, you might want to look into protecting the pond too. That's my worry with the feeder fish, they might have a higher chance of being eaten. They also might not grow to their potential. Any lfs with larger common goldfish or sarasa comets? :(

Edited by Haruka
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I don't see much point in quarantining if you get the fish from the same source.

If it were me, it would depend on your income and the possibility of predators getting the goldies to get fancier mail order goldies.

At my old community garden, a heron ate a lot of goldfish. Would hate for those to be expensive mail order goldies.

I think the only problem we might have are coyotes (don't know if they eat fish) and raccoons. But the pond is going to be pretty close to the house and also pretty deep. I really like the simple goldies best like my two comets. And I never had a really expensive fish before, but I'd still stick with singletails or watonai.

I this case the qt would be more for their benefit, to see if they are healthy etc, which might be more difficult in a pond.

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That's also a very good point, you might want to look into protecting the pond too. That's my worry with the feeder fish, they might have a higher chance of being eaten. They also might not grow to their potential. Any lfs with larger common goldfish or sarasa comets? :(

Aquarium city close to us has some big pond comets and goldies. I think I'll put a net over the pond when I'm not around anyways to protect the fish and our clumsy Great Dane if he happens to be out by himself. :)

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A net works well and maybe some kind of fencing around the pond because once coyotes and racoons find a food source in that pond they'll keep coming back. The net sounds like an excellent idea and having it deep is good so herons can't wade in it. I would try going after some big pond comets. More of a fighting chance and you could probably quarantine them too just incase.

How big can you get the feeders?

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A net works well and maybe some kind of fencing around the pond because once coyotes and racoons find a food source in that pond they'll keep coming back. The net sounds like an excellent idea and having it deep is good so herons can't wade in it. I would try going after some big pond comets. More of a fighting chance and you could probably quarantine them too just incase.

How big can you get the feeders?

I think the biggest feeders I saw were about 3-4 inches incl. tail. The pond comets and goldies were more like 7 or 8.

Maybe you're right about getting something bigger. I never though about it from the "predator survival side". They definitely have plenty of places to hide, though. At least that is the plan..

Thanks for your advise

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