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Dorsal Fin Clamped


npila1

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[*]Ammonia Level? 0

[*]Nitrite Level? 0

[*]Nitrate level? 5

[*]Ph Level, Tank (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines)? 7.4-7.6

[*]Ph Level, Tap (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines)? 6.8 (I use buff it up)

[*]Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops? API drops

[*]Water temperature? 72-74

[*]Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running? 20 gallons, 5 months

[*]What is the name and size of the filter(s)? Tetra/Aquaculture 10-30 gallons

[*]How often do you change the water and how much? twice a week, 30% each time

[*]How many fish in the tank and their size? 1 comet and 1 common, 2.5-3 inches each

[*]What kind of water additives or conditioners? Prime

[*]What do you feed your fish and how often? twice a day: progold, peas, banana, freeze dried bloodworms, corn, flakes (soaked)

[*]Any new fish added to the tank? no

[*]Any medications added to the tank? prazipro was added for 6-7 weeks to treat flukes, added for the last time 11 days ago

[*]Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt," bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus? no

[*]Any unusual behavior like staying at the bottom, not eating, etc.? I've noticed that my comet, Twinkle, has her dorsal fin clamped much of the time while swimming around/hovering, but at other times it's up. She doesn't bottom sit, has great appetite, and everything else looks fine.

I saw her clamping her dorsal several times today, so I did a water test and the only thing I noticed was that the nitrates are at 5 ppm. They have been at 0 ppm for the past 2 months and this is the first time I get a reading of 5. I know 5 is not bad, but could this be the reason for the clamping?

Is this something I should be worried about?

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Everything looks good with your parameters from what I can see. The only thing that caught my interest was the appearance of nitrates recently which may be an indication that you may need to increase your water change percentages. I would try moving up to 50% and see if that helps somewhat. Also try testing your tap water for nitrates as mine is always 10. The clamped dorsal fin is not necessarily a bad omen but if all fins are clamped that's an indication of something going wrong.

And also keep in mind that your common and comet need 20 gal per fish...they're going to get big and need a lot of room to swim. ;)

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Hi, thanks for the reply! I do know they need a bigger tank and I'm planning to upgrade :)

I tested my tap water a few months ago and everything (ammonia, nitrites, nitrates) was 0. I don't know if it could have changed now, but I'll check. Not all her fins are clamped, and the dorsal fin is only occasionally clamped. I'll keep an eye on her though.

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Mine do it occasionally too when swimming through a filter current or even just being weird. If your fish are active and eating well then it sounds like everything's fine...just keep a close watch on them. I always look for dorsal fins to be erect and all other fins loose and flowing at all times in my tanks. Constantly clamped fins are a bad omen. ;)

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The levels in my tap water change a bit through the day and after a large amount of rain or melted snow.

I make sure to test my tap PH EVERY time I change my water, I don't test as regularly in the tap for ammonia and the two N's. Typically, only if there is something funky going on with my results in the tank.

Just wanted to let you know that it's very, very possible for your tap water's chemistry to fluctuate, so it couldn't hurt to re-test!

Keep us posted!

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The levels in my tap water change a bit through the day and after a large amount of rain or melted snow.

I make sure to test my tap PH EVERY time I change my water, I don't test as regularly in the tap for ammonia and the two N's. Typically, only if there is something funky going on with my results in the tank.

Just wanted to let you know that it's very, very possible for your tap water's chemistry to fluctuate, so it couldn't hurt to re-test!

Keep us posted!

Hi thanks for the reply :) I do check the pH of the new water every time (just because it's low and I add buff it up and have to check that it goes to ~7.5 before adding it to the tank), but I don't check the rest. I guess I'll start doing that too once in a while :]

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