Jump to content

1St Pond Beginner Questions


Kerstin

Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

Hi there,

I am thinking of either building an inground 300G or a 150G above ground patio pond (depending what I can get away with). Now I have a few beginner questions:

1. Do they need to be cycled like fish tanks

2. Do they need regular 50% waterchanges or can you get away with less because the are so large

And last but not least I live in the San Fernando Valley in California where it can get really hot in the summer. Will that be a problem or is there a way to cool the water down if it gets too hot like a water cooler instead of heater?

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I'll give you my experience with having a 300 gallon in ground pond here in Houston. I would definitely cycle it. I started with my pond cycled, but this year algae has taken it over and it now runs what is called " green water". That's where the algae takes up all the ammonia and converts it into growing more algae.

When I had the pond cycled, I would change out a quarter to a third if we hadn't had any rain for a while. With the green water I change a quarter to a half a week to keep the algae from completely taking over. The biggest factor in how often you do water changes is how you stock the pond. If you go by the 20 gallon per goldfish rule, I would just treat it like a really big tank and do at least 50% weekly water changes. Personally, I only have 3 commons in my 300 gallons. Even at 100 gallons per fish they still get it messy fairly quickly, but I also get wildlife like toads and dragonfly larvae in summer.

As far as temperatures go, my pond is close to 90 in summer, when the daytime temperatures are 95-98 and the nights only get down to about 80. I have a large fountain and lots of surface movement which keeps the temperatures down a bit. In winter the pond has gotten as low as 40, and the top even froze over for a couple of days. But like I said, I have commons in there, which handle the temperature extremes okay. I have one telescope who spend the summer in the pond, but is back inside in a tank for the winter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

thanks for the advise Claire. I'm glad the temperature changes doesn't bother them. We usually don't go under 50F in the winter, but it gets really hot in the summer.

So basically with the water changes etc. it's the same as a tank. Maybe one less water change a week. I was thinking to put about 4 fish in there, comets most likely as these are my favorites. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I like comets too. They are really fun to see zooming around a big space. :)

I thought of another thing I wished I had done differently. My pond gets at least 8 hours of direct sun in summer, and that is making my algae problem really bad. It also makes the water heat up faster. A couple of hours of sun would be okay, but I wish I had put it in a different spot now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Yes cycle your pond, it will go through different stages, such as a bacteria bloom and algae bloom. There are all natural substances you can use to help keep your pond water clear, I like to use products from Bactapur, a UV sterilizer will help with green water but will not get rid of algae. For my customers I always suggest live plants. Around 65% of your pond should have plants. I agree with cometgirl you will also need water movement.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Yes cycle your pond, it will go through different stages, such as a bacteria bloom and algae bloom. There are all natural substances you can use to help keep your pond water clear, I like to use products from Bactapur, a UV sterilizer will help with green water but will not get rid of algae. For my customers I always suggest live plants. Around 65% of your pond should have plants. I agree with cometgirl you will also need water movement.

Thanks for the advise. I'll look into that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

thanks for the advise Claire. I'm glad the temperature changes doesn't bother them. We usually don't go under 50F in the winter, but it gets really hot in the summer.

So basically with the water changes etc. it's the same as a tank. Maybe one less water change a week. I was thinking to put about 4 fish in there, comets most likely as these are my favorites. :)

Hi Kerstin, welcome to pond gf keeping, it's a lot easier to maintain as compared to aquariums and your fish will stride better because of it's natural environment. Setting it up correctly is very important, meaning, the right size pond for the type and number of gf you are planning to keep, it's location, (your area is very hot in summer....how many degree?). In summer it is preferred not to have no more than 5hrs of strong direct sunlight, otherwise the water gets heated up too quickly and pose problems like algae bloom (green pea soup) or lack of oxygen(fish dieing) and if that is the case, you may have to manually add some shading just for hot days. Also adding a fountain pump can also help to lower it's temperature and increase aeration to promote more dissolved oxygen and also enhance it's look.

It's better to have a deeper pond (24inch max) than a shallower one, this allowed a more stable environment and you can grow plants of your choice in pots. I preferred bared bottom. Concerning filtration, it depends what you want to achieve. If you aim for crystal clear water, then a UV is a must (don't add any b/s additives to clear you water, it's a waste of money) but if you can tolerate a bit of green water, then any pond filter according to your pond size will suffice. W/c routine is a lot less than indoors aquarium, say your situation 4 comets, 20% once a week in summer is plenty but you have to take evaporation in as well. During winter, w/c can be scaled back while at the same time catching some rainwater can also save you time and money.

cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

thanks for the advise Claire. I'm glad the temperature changes doesn't bother them. We usually don't go under 50F in the winter, but it gets really hot in the summer.

So basically with the water changes etc. it's the same as a tank. Maybe one less water change a week. I was thinking to put about 4 fish in there, comets most likely as these are my favorites. :)

Hi Kerstin, welcome to pond gf keeping, it's a lot easier to maintain as compared to aquariums and your fish will stride better because of it's natural environment. Setting it up correctly is very important, meaning, the right size pond for the type and number of gf you are planning to keep, it's location, (your area is very hot in summer....how many degree?). In summer it is preferred not to have no more than 5hrs of strong direct sunlight, otherwise the water gets heated up too quickly and pose problems like algae bloom (green pea soup) or lack of oxygen(fish dieing) and if that is the case, you may have to manually add some shading just for hot days. Also adding a fountain pump can also help to lower it's temperature and increase aeration to promote more dissolved oxygen and also enhance it's look.

It's better to have a deeper pond (24inch max) than a shallower one, this allowed a more stable environment and you can grow plants of your choice in pots. I preferred bared bottom. Concerning filtration, it depends what you want to achieve. If you aim for crystal clear water, then a UV is a must (don't add any b/s additives to clear you water, it's a waste of money) but if you can tolerate a bit of green water, then any pond filter according to your pond size will suffice. W/c routine is a lot less than indoors aquarium, say your situation 4 comets, 20% once a week in summer is plenty but you have to take evaporation in as well. During winter, w/c can be scaled back while at the same time catching some rainwater can also save you time and money.

cheers

Thanks for all the info lionchu. The place with the most shade would be the patio, but then I could only put about a 150G pond up. In the back yard the only places with shade are under trees which would be slightly messy I guess, but then I could build a 300G inground. The temps in the summer sometimes go up to 110 F, so I would be worried about too much sun...

I could tolerate greenish water as long as it would be ok for the fish, so I guess I'd be ok without a UV? As for rainwater we don't get that much at a time...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

My preference is to go for the 300Gal first . Semi- inground is better as it gives better water stability and also prevent dirt from sweeping into it, also looks better too. I got a 350Gal and a 150Gal. I built the 350 Gal first then the other. My advise is to avoid putting it under trees. Under full sun, there are plenty of ways to overcome overheating or algae problems.

Same here, no rain, as dry as a desert. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

My preference is to go for the 300Gal first . Semi- inground is better as it gives better water stability and also prevent dirt from sweeping into it, also looks better too. I got a 350Gal and a 150Gal. I built the 350 Gal first then the other. My advise is to avoid putting it under trees. Under full sun, there are plenty of ways to overcome overheating or algae problems.

Same here, no rain, as dry as a desert. :)

Thanks lionchu. I'll see if I can talk my husband into "tolerating" a 300G. I think I found a good spot for it, too.

Would love to see photos of your ponds. Do you have some posted here somewhere? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

My preference is to go for the 300Gal first . Semi- inground is better as it gives better water stability and also prevent dirt from sweeping into it, also looks better too. I got a 350Gal and a 150Gal. I built the 350 Gal first then the other. My advise is to avoid putting it under trees. Under full sun, there are plenty of ways to overcome overheating or algae problems.

Same here, no rain, as dry as a desert. :)

Thanks lionchu. I'll see if I can talk my husband into "tolerating" a 300G. I think I found a good spot for it, too.

Would love to see photos of your ponds. Do you have some posted here somewhere? :)

Here they are. :)

http://www.kokosgold...__1#entry892808

http://www.kokosgold...nd/page__st__20

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...