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How Long Can They Live Without An Air Pumper?


pinkskitty93

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Is there a problem with it :unsure:

Air pump is very important!

Fsh can suffocate very fast without bubbles. Do you have a filter?

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  • Regular Member

Is there a problem with it :unsure:

Air pump is very important!

Fsh can suffocate very fast without bubbles. Do you have a filter?

If I put a real plant inside my tank, will it make enough oxygen for my fishes to stay alive?

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I don't use an air pump right now and they do fine.

You do have a filter and enough space for your goldfish right? 20 gallons for the first fancy 10 gallons for each after. Or 20 gallons per long bodied goldfish with 10xgph per gallon? If you have that a at stone/bubble wand is only needed for looks. Just have to make sure the water surface has enough movement with the filters.

In the mean time find an air pump that does not overheat if you like the bubbles.

If you do turn it off at night remove the air stone/buble wand cause water can back up into the pump if you do not have a safety valve and it well leak out of the tank.

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Oh since you don't have a filter you have to leave it on all the time. Need that water agitation to help with water to oxygen exchange. Or is that air to water? Anyways got to keep it moving some how.

Also be sure to get a test kit and test daily. You well need to do daily water changes while your new tank cycles.

I would also like to suggest you go to Koko's website and read up on goldfish care along with the info on cycling a tank. Here is the link in case you can't find it at the top of this page. Koko's

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If I put a real plant inside my tank, will it make enough oxygen for my fishes to stay alive?

No, not at night. Plants are fantastic for keeping nitrogen toxins down in the tank, and they will produce more oxygen in photosynthesis than they use in respiring, but as soon as the lights go out the photosynthesising stops and the plants are just consuming oxygen like any other living creature. In a highly planted tank without an air supply and high oxygen demand fish (like goldies), it is possible for the fish to suffocate as the plants use everything up, and they will at least start gasping at the top of the tank if nothing else trying to get enough oxygen there. This is not ideal as it is but it can also lead to swimbladder problems from the air intake. I love plants and I think everyone should have them but they do require a degree of care of their own and they do require you to take considerations for how they will effect the tank.

Have you considered getting a timer block for your airpump? You could have it so it's on for 1 hour, off for 1 hour or something if you wanted :) Then the fishies get oxygen and the pump doesn't fry. It does sound like you need to look into getting a new one though.

Get the biggest filter you can and if you position it so the outlet is above the surface of the water then the splash will give some oxygen too :) It does sound like you need to do some reading on cycling etc, filters are absolutely crucial in a goldfish tank :) Good luck :)

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I guess I didn't use my common sense and, I'm not that much of a science type of person..

I only bought the tank, air pump and filter in a small store which has not enough items.

And what do test kits look like? :D (im still a newbie..hehe)

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Look in the aisle with the medication. You'll probably want a brand called API if you can get it. Whatever you do, make sure you do not get those multi-test strips. You want drop test kits with glass tubes.

If you can, get the API Fresh Water Master Test Kit, it's a little pricey, but it has everything you need to keep your fish's water in good condition and will last you a long time.

If you can't, get at least tests for ammonia and nitrite. Ammonia first because it's the most toxic and also what you will be dealing with in the first stages of cycling. Nitrite is toxic too, and you'll see that in the second stage. Nitrate is also important, but you don't have to worry about it until your cycle is established so you have some time to save up.

A PH test kit will be handy, particularly if your fish show signs of odd behavior after a water change.

Buying the Master Test kit will save you money in the long run.

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Remember that if you do not have a filter, you need to run your air pump and bubbler 24/7. Be sure to get a filter that turns enough gph. We follow the 10x rule. For example, a 10 gallon tank needs a filter turning 100 gallons per hour. A 20 gallon, 200 and so on. Do not follow the 'ratings' on the box. A filter rated for 10-30 gallons may only do 150GP. Which for goldfish. Is only enough for a 10 gallon tank.

If you are planning on buying a bigger tank in the future, make sure you buy a filter that pushes enough GPH for the new tank. For example: if your fish are currently in 10 gallons, but you want to upgrade to 20, buy a filter doing 200GPH so you don't need to upgrade the filter when you upgrade the tank.

Welcome to Kokos!!

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Ich is very common unfortunately with pet store fish, and the black marks sound like they could be ammonia burn. I recommend you get a test kit and head on over to the Diagnosis and Discussion forum and answer as many of the questions at the top as possible, we need 90% of them to make be able to recommend a good course of treatment, and sometimes just one of those questions can show exactly what the problem is when it hadn't even been considered before. The thread will get more attention in the Disease forum than it will here and you'll get more advice :)LINK Neither of the issues you've described at first pass are hugely complicated to deal with in my experience but you are going to have to spend some time each day doing water changes for the fish to beat it.

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