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Every Thing I'll Need For A Breeding Tank?


2008paul

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Some of you may have seen my topic about me wantting to set-up a apple snail tank. I'm soon getting a new goldfish tank, so that mean the 60L tank from them will be used for the snails.

I'm just wanting some tips/ideas etc to help me with this.

So have some Q's that I hope you lot could help me with.

Do I need a heater?

Do I need a tank for new born snails or can I just cut of a bit of the tank for the baby?

Do I need a filter?

Do I need a airpump?

How often do I need to clean out a apple snail tank?

What tempeture do apple snails need to be in?

Do I still need to put in "Tap safe" etc like I do with goldfish?

Any tips to get apple snails to breed?

Thanks

Paul

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Filters and heaters are very much needed. Heater if your room temperature falls below 68 degrees otherwise you don't need to. As far as airpumps, you won't need it especially if your filter can create adequate surface movements to ensure adequate oxygen. Besides that, apple snails can breathe air outside water.

Snails are sensitive to ammonia, nitrite, chlorine and chloramine. They need to be treated in the same respect as we do with fish.

Look at this blog for snails sexing.

http://sexingapplesnails.blogspot.com/

There are plenty of info below for apple snails.

Scientific Name: Pomacea diffusa (formerly Pomacea bridgesii)

Common Names: Golden Mystery Snail, Brig, Golden Apple Snail, Mystery Snail

Care Level: easy

Adult Size: 2.5 inches

pH Range: 7.0-8.0

Temperature Range: 18-27 degrees Celsius (64-81 degrees Fahrenheit)

Origin: South America

Temperament: peaceful

Compatible Tankmates:

They can be kept in most community setups but do not attempt to keep them with fish that have a voracious appetite for invertebrates, particularly loaches of the botiine genus and puffers. Be very careful when selecting their tankmates. Most fish are tempted to nip their eyes and antennae. While the snails have the ability to regenerate their lost body parts, it is not advisable to push through your plans to risk them with possibly nippy fish. They will only be stressed out severely from constant harassments.

If the fish can tolerate hard alkaline water aside from being passive over the snails, they may be your best options as most specimens from soft acidic waters become more prone to finrot once the water chemistry is altered.

Diet:

These snails prefer dead and decaying plant parts rather than the healthy plant specimens which make them perfectly suited for planted tank setups. They will appreciate fish foods and vegetable matter in their diet. Use calcium enriched foods to ensure their shells will not erode. The use of calcium pills, liquid calcium, cuttlefish bones, plaster of Paris pucks and eggshells is widely encouraged for healthy shell conditions. The pH must be maintained no lower than 7.0 as acidic water tends to erode the shells thus leaving the snail more susceptible to health issues, predatory attacks and even death.

Tank Size For Adult: A 2.5g per adult.

Narrative:

Pomacea diffusa are snails that are part of the Pomacea genus (formerly Ampullaridae). These are often referred to as golden apple snails, golden mystery snails, mystery snails or simply brigs. These snails originated from South America ranging from Southeast Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia.

The shell of this species has about 5 to 6 whorls. The most obvious characteristics of the shell are the square shoulders (flat at the top of the whorls) and almost 90? sutures. The shell opening (aperture) is large and oval, the umbilicus is large and deep. They have a thick operculum which can be retracted into the shell opening. There are quite a lot of shell color variations ranging from burgundy, ivory, gold, blue and many more.

These snails are sexual and therefore need a partner in order to breed. They are not sexually matured until they reach 2.5 cm in size. It is not easy to distinguish their sexes however if you can remove the snail out of the water and observe closely the right side of its body, you may find the penis sheath in there. This will tell you the snail is a male. Another way is when they copulate. Males are often found clinging at the right side of their fellow snails. You will know by then the one clinging is a male. Males will attempt to copulate with anyone regardless of their sexes so the snail they may be clinging could be a male or a female.

They lay clutches of peachy to white eggs above the waterline containing 50-300 eggs. The eggs must be kept in warm humid conditions. Removing them from their location involves using a razor blade without crushing them. Wait for 24 hours for the eggs to harden before removing them. Place the clutch in a damp paper towel or filter floss afterwards. The eggs will become lighter as time progresses. You can tell when the eggs are about to hatch when they break easily as you touch or attempt to move them. The hatchlings may need a little assistance in this case. You can gently swish the eggs in the water so they fall off to the bottom although most hatchlings are able to eat their way out and go to the water. The hatchlings will remain hidden from view most of the time so be patient. They will eventually show up. They are colorless but the colors should eventually darken after a week. They will grow rapidly at this point. It has been suggested however the hatchlings be confined in breeder nets or hatchery for awhile until they reach pea size. This way, they will not have to compete with the larger snails for foods. Most hatchlings die from starvation as they look around for food.

These snails prefer dead and decaying plant parts rather than the healthy plant specimens which make them perfectly suited for planted tank setups. They will appreciate fish foods and vegetable matter in their diet. Use calcium enriched foods to ensure their shells will not erode. The use of calcium pills, liquid calcium, cuttlefish bones, plaster of Paris pucks and eggshells is widely encouraged for healthy shell conditions. The pH must be maintained no lower than 7.0 as acidic water tends to erode the shells thus leaving the snail more susceptible to health issues, predatory attacks and even death.

They can be kept in most community setups but do not attempt to keep them with fish that have a voracious appetite for invertebrates, particularly loaches of the botiine genus and puffers. Be very careful when selecting their tankmates. Most fish are tempted to nip their eyes and antennae. While the snails have the ability to regenerate their lost body parts, it is not advisable to push through your plans to risk them with possibly nippy fish. They will only be stressed out severely from constant harassments.

If the fish can tolerate hard alkaline water aside from being passive over the snails, they may be your best options as most specimens from soft acidic waters become more prone to finrot once the water chemistry is altered.

References: www.applesnail.net

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