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Refrigerator?


oeyjay143

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I was thinking about a dorm sized fridge... What do you guys think about creating a temporary winter for goldfish inside of a dorm sized refrigerator? you could run cords inside through the front and adjust the temp of the air. Of course I would never do this without testing it without goldfish first to make sure things would work out right... But I was just wondering what you all thought. And also suggestion/alternatives please... I cannot afford a chiller and also the mini fridge would give me a place to cool some nice Dr. Pepper.

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well, yeah I meant putting them in the fridge... I mean it wouldnt hurt them if the light was kept on in it and if the temp was monitered... And they had filtration and everything. I dont know, it kinda sounds a bit cruel. But its really not... I mean we have air condition houses.

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I really wouldn't do anything of that sort, they really don't need a temporary winter I don't think, especially if they're in a tank. They don't need that, I think it would be very stressful for them.

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I really wouldn't do anything of that sort, they really don't need a temporary winter I don't think, especially if they're in a tank. They don't need that, I think it would be very stressful for them.

yeah, probably...

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They should do fine with warmer temps, all you need to do is make sure there is tons and tons of surface agitation to allow for more dissolved oxygen in the water. Warmer water doesn't hold oxygen as well, so put as many bubble wands in there as you can. You can try aiming a fan over the water's surface too, that will help cool the tank. :)

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I read here that running water into the fridge will not work... No anyone who has actually done this?

No I don't think so. It just seems cruel in my opinion, what if something went wrong and the water never froze over and they just chilled to death in there? I just would not go near the idea at all for their safety. The sheer mechanics of it would be much too difficult to be pulled off.

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yeah, Im not going to try it... It was just an idea. I figure anyway, the price of a mini fridge would be a good investment on a chiller. And btw guys this is for breeding purposes not cooling the tank in general...

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Why do you need to simulate winter to make them breed? I think the temp really only needs to be lowered by a few degrees. Wish Daryl was here to give her input...

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Also, refrigerators cannot be run properly unless they are in the upright position.. depending on what kind you get too.. you might kill your fish with the freon-substitute that is used to cool if something funky happens since freon is usually no longer legally permitted in refrigerators..

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I would really not do that.

My tortoise hibernates in the fridge but it is something quite precise and complicated to do - I have no idea how you could manage to put fish - it would also be way to cold...

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hey.. we don't put ppl in fridges to cool them down in summer. we provide fans for them.. why should we put live fish in fridges??? it doesn't make sense to me..

hey, have you ever forgotten a bottle of beer in the freezer or soft drink? seen the effects of a burst bottle, imagine the fish?

also, to keep food in the fridge is fine, it doesn't freeze, but if you keep large amounts of water in the fridge, no matter what the thermostat is at, after a certain amount of time the fine layer of the water always freezes due to lack of movement at the surface.. so that gives you an idea of how much the temperature inside the tank is prior to the surface freezing over.. your fish will have to deal with "ice age" and they WILL NOT win the battle.

also, you say, "have to try to find out how to keep the light on.. " that's built into the fridge, no probs, i can tell you how to do that, but i won't .. i already know how to keep the light on.. your main problem here is, a: filtration and electricity to and from, b: the top layer freezing over when you are not there to look after them.. sometimes it only takes a few hours.. particularly if yout thermostat is not working well or at all.

IMO, sakura's advise to you about a fan directed to the surface of the water is a fantastic idea and very effective.. it's what most aquarists do and have had no problems summer after summer..

enclosing your tank in the fridge is an extremity we recommend against..

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Oejay (p.s. is that pig-latin for Joey? lol) here are some tidbits of information I found that Daryl has posted. She is a long-time member here who has leagues of experience breeding her goldfish so you can be sure it's good info. From what she writes, it seems best to go along with the natural seasons rather than trying to create a colder period during summer. Just wait for winter when it is naturally cooler out, because that will make it easier to get temps between 64 and 68. In fact you probably won't even have to try to lower the temp, but it will just be this temp at room temperature. If it's not cold enough even at the cooler room temps in winter, then you can try the fan trick and I think that will lower your temp sufficiently. So without further ado, here's Daryl:

As far as the fish go - you are just now going into spring. AS the days lengthen, the temps warm and spring comes, storms will bring different air pressure. Fish spawn most commonly when the waters have gently warmed, the days are longer, the air pressure changes just before a storm and the water is cooled by a degree or two as if a cool spring rain has filled the pond. I usually warm my tanks by a few degrees and leave the lights on a bit longer. Look for the forecast and find a "storm" coming. 2-3 days before the storm comes, start changing water - about 50% each day - with water that is 2-4 degrees cooler than the water in the tank. Look at dawn - fish like to spawn at dawn. If you miss the first drop, you can usually catch the subsequent ones - they often drop for several days.
Raising fry is a long, drawnout procedure that takes loads of time, commitment and money. Housing fry is exhausting - for the sheer volume and water changes can be daunting. Only get into it if you really consider what you are going to do when you need 50000 gallons of water!

As far as "feeding them up".... that is a completely fallacy. Overfeeding your fish, male OR female, will only result in a fatty fish - and a fatty fish does not breed. I am not talking about "Fat" fish, but one with an overabundance of fatty buildup.

In the best of circumstances, fish can be "prepped" for breeding by starting in the late summer to early fall. Naturally, in a pond, as the days get shorter and the air cooler, many insects will die and fall on the surface of the pond. The goldfish will eat these - a diet leaning towards protien. Summer and spring diets are more heavy in greens - new algae, plant growth tips, etc. Fall is protien. The fish then, ideally, will go through a "dormant" period - a period of cooler temps where they do little or NO feeding, depending on the temps. This period can be as short as 4-5 weeks or as long as 4 months, depending on the climate. At the END of the dormancy, the water warms with the spring sun and rains, the green algae starts to grow and the fish warm up and look to start spawning.

The signals for a properly prepped breeding fish are warmer waters, changes in airpressure that normally come with spring rain storms, an abundance of growing algae and plants and longer hours of daylight.

Feeding heavy, over done meals of... whatever (protien? Greens? ) will not do the trick. Many fish will breed anyway... at least in their first spring/summer following their hatch year. That seems to be programed into every fish - and given any kind of health and water, most will try it to a degree. But after that - forget it.

I suggest that you feed them normally - a good SINKING fish food. If you have to use Koi pellets, select a "Spring Diet" - one that is made for spring feeding of a fish coming from dormacy. You can make the pellets NONFLOATING by putting them into gel food. Floating pellets are just asking for trouble with goldies.

WAtch for spring storms and CHANGE CHANGE CHANGE the water. Make sure you have the proper spawning grasses, brine shrimp eggs ready to hatch (and the hatcheries) (Eggs will cost about $40US for a season's worth for a small spawning of 1000 fry), and multiple tanks ready for the fry (you should probably have at least 3 to begin with....)

Fry will also require a special filtering system - start it now seeding - and a specialized water changing regiment - you cannot cause currents or you will damage backs and fins.

Plan ahead - and you may have more success. Most importantly, though, is know that the fish are "prepped" starting the year before. Feeding huge amounts of food will only foul your water and create a fatty fish that cannot breed

Hope this helps.

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