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Peterlock

Hiraki Goldfish Food With Msg?

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I was reading the ingediants of Hiraki Gold Fancy Goldfish food and was surprised to see MSG (Monosodium Glutamate) as an ingrediant and high up on the scale at that.

The protien level is fine at 45% but it strikes me as odd because so many people - and animals are sensitive to MSG and many have adverse reactions to it.

My guys get a variety of sinking pellets Aqueon, Tetra, Spectrum and I mix their diet up with blanched peas, string beans, collard greens and spinach. They like frozen bloodworms (Hiraki brand, I hate the mess) and bits of fresh orange. Does anyone use this Hiraki blend or have a feeling one way or the other about the MSG?

Here's a list of the ingediants:

Fish Meal, Wheat Germ Meal, Wheat Flour, Brewer's Dried Yeast, Starch, Dried Bakery Product, Soy Bean Meal, Gluten Meal, Fish Oil, Spirulina, Vegetable Oil, Astaxanthin, Dried Seaweed Meal, Dried A. niger Fermentation Extract, Monosodium Glutamate, Dl-methionine, Garlic, Dried B. subtilis Fermentation Product, Rice Bran, Choline Chloride, Vitamin E Supplement, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (Stabilized Vitamin C), Inositol, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin, Vitamin A Oil, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Niacin, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex (Source of Vitamin K), Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Disodium Phosphate, Ferrous Sulfate, Magnesium Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate, Cobalt Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, and Calcium Iodate.

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein 45% min.

Crude Fat 7% min.

Crude Fiber 3.0% max.

Moisture 10% max.

Crude Ash 20% max.

Phosphorus 1.8% min.

B. subtilis 10,000 CFU/g min.

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I'm not crazy about the MSG being in there (I mean, I avoid it for myself, so really wouldn't want to have my fish eat it).

Interestingly, though, the MSG is NOT an ingredientin Hikari Lionhead or Saki-Hikari, my two favorite Hikari varieties. I wonder why they seem to feel the regular formula needs that extra "bump" of flavor from the MSG. :hummm

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WOW thats just silly... Im one of those few ppl that gets very sick if I get MSG in my food. :( Now putting it in fish foods for what.... ??

"MSG actually tricks your brain into thinking the food you are eating tastes good. Manufacturers can therefore use inferior ingredients to make a mediocre product seem tastier."

I found this on the net, so in a since they are doing this to stimulate there brains and eat more, eating more cause it tastes good, so what does it taste like for the fish with out it in there? Is the food that bad they have to put it in?

WOW :yikes

http://www.squidoo.com/msg

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WOW thats just silly... Im one of those few ppl that gets very sick if I get MSG in my food. :( Now putting it in fish foods for what.... ??

"MSG actually tricks your brain into thinking the food you are eating tastes good. Manufacturers can therefore use inferior ingredients to make a mediocre product seem tastier."

I found this on the net, so in a since they are doing this to stimulate there brains and eat more, eating more cause it tastes good, so what does it taste like for the fish with out it in there? Is the food that bad they have to put it in?

WOW :yikes

http://www.squidoo.com/msg

Koko - Thanks for posting the link, I agree it's so STRANGE! I'm sensitive to MSG too, I get migraines and that'll trigger one in about 6 hours. All the Chinese/Asian restaurants have huge NO MSG signs on their menu...and in fish food?

Back to the store it goes, I was a putz not to read the ingredients while I was there.

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Just to add a bit more to this older thread. You are correct that MSG is added to food to make it more tasty. Mammals (like us) have five different taste receptors on our tongue. Four are fairly familiar to us: sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. The fifth, umami or what we call "savoriness" was discovered by Japanese researchers in the early 20th century. The savoriness receptors on our tongue respond to glutamates that are prevalent in cheeses, seafood, and some vegetables. This is also why you can find glutamate additives like MSG in all kinds of foods to make them more savory. Now the big question is do fish have the same taste receptors? I'll do some digging and find out.

Cheers,

Tyler

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I think it's also important to realize that there are some naturally occurring foods with MSG such as seaweeds... Although I don't know what kind of MSG they are putting into the fish food, if they are utilizing seaweed, then perhaps that is a source?

http://www.gobeyondorganic.com/Weekly-News-Tips/the-good-and-bad-msg.html

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Guest Londo

I think it's also important to realize that there are some naturally occurring foods with MSG such as seaweeds... Although I don't know what kind of MSG they are putting into the fish food, if they are utilizing seaweed, then perhaps that is a source?

http://www.gobeyondorganic.com/Weekly-News-Tips/the-good-and-bad-msg.html

I think when monosdium glutamate (or any glutamate salt) dissolves in an aqueous solution, it immediately dissociates into sodium cations and glutamate anions, the latter of which is exactly the same form of glutamate that is found in natural glutamate sources, so ultimately once within the body of any animal it ends up exactly the same.

Like cyprinid said, natural glutamte can be found in kelp extract, wheat and yest extracts even cheeses. It may be that Hikari add MSG to the regular food in lieu of the extra ingredients they add to the fancier foods. Remember MSG is very popular in Asia, especially Japan, and they don't have the same worries about it.

Personally, I wouldn't be too worried when giving to my fish, but it is really up to you.

Edited by Londo

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MSG is marketed as "Accent" in supermarkets. It is funny, though, that it is considered a flavor enhancer, because by itself, it tastes really disgusting. I tried it as a kid.

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Salt by itself is pretty gross too though, but it enhances flavor.

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