Jump to content

Myster Snail


Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

I saw some really cute mystery snails at my lps the other day and noticed a few of you goldfish keepers have them as well,my question is what is the snail per gallon rule?what do you feed them and how??do they eat algae?any info would be greatly appreciated :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I managed to compile some data on these snails which I also currently keep.smile.gif They're no longer called Pomacea bridgesii after Ken Hayes changed the taxonomic name to P. diffusa.

By the way, these snails are not efficient algae eaters so you can forget about using them to clean up algae. They're not the best choice and their bioload can rival heavy poop machines such as plecos. They eat just about anything you can provide for them and mine eat hair algae (although they will avoid other types of algae).

Scientific Name: Pomacea diffusa (formerly Pomacea bridgesii)

Common Names: Golden Mystery Snail, Brig, Golden Apple Snail, Mystery Snail

Care Level: easy

Adult Size: 2.5 inches

pH Range: 7.0-8.0

Temperature Range: 18-27 degrees Celsius (64-81 degrees Fahrenheit)

Origin: South America

Temperament: peaceful

Compatible Tankmates:

They can be kept in most community setups but do not attempt to keep them with fish that have a voracious appetite for invertebrates, particularly loaches of the botiine genus and puffers. Be very careful when selecting their tankmates. Most fish are tempted to nip their eyes and antennae. While the snails have the ability to regenerate their lost body parts, it is not advisable to push through your plans to risk them with possibly nippy fish. They will only be stressed out severely from constant harassments.

If the fish can tolerate hard alkaline water aside from being passive over the snails, they may be your best options as most specimens from soft acidic waters become more prone to finrot once the water chemistry is altered.

Diet:

These snails prefer dead and decaying plant parts rather than the healthy plant specimens which make them perfectly suited for planted tank setups. They will appreciate fish foods and vegetable matter in their diet. Use calcium enriched foods to ensure their shells will not erode. The use of calcium pills, liquid calcium, cuttlefish bones, plaster of Paris pucks and eggshells is widely encouraged for healthy shell conditions. The pH must be maintained no lower than 7.0 as acidic water tends to erode the shells thus leaving the snail more susceptible to health issues, predatory attacks and even death.

Tank Size For Adult: A 2.5g per adult.

Narrative:

Pomacea diffusa are snails that are part of the Pomacea genus (formerly Ampullaridae). These are often referred to as golden apple snails, golden mystery snails, mystery snails or simply brigs. These snails originated from South America ranging from Southeast Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia.

The shell of this species has about 5 to 6 whorls. The most obvious characteristics of the shell are the square shoulders (flat at the top of the whorls) and almost 90° sutures. The shell opening (aperture) is large and oval, the umbilicus is large and deep. They have a thick operculum which can be retracted into the shell opening. There are quite a lot of shell color variations ranging from burgundy, ivory, gold, blue and many more.

These snails are sexual and therefore need a partner in order to breed. They are not sexually matured until they reach 2.5 cm in size. It is not easy to distinguish their sexes however if you can remove the snail out of the water and observe closely the right side of its body, you may find the penis sheath in there. This will tell you the snail is a male. Another way is when they copulate. Males are often found clinging at the right side of their fellow snails. You will know by then the one clinging is a male. Males will attempt to copulate with anyone regardless of their sexes so the snail they may be clinging could be a male or a female.

They lay clutches of peachy to white eggs above the waterline containing 50-300 eggs. The eggs must be kept in warm humid conditions. Removing them from their location involves using a razor blade without crushing them. Wait for 24 hours for the eggs to harden before removing them. Place the clutch in a damp paper towel or filter floss afterwards. The eggs will become lighter as time progresses. You can tell when the eggs are about to hatch when they break easily as you touch or attempt to move them. The hatchlings may need a little assistance in this case. You can gently swish the eggs in the water so they fall off to the bottom although most hatchlings are able to eat their way out and go to the water. The hatchlings will remain hidden from view most of the time so be patient. They will eventually show up. They are colorless but the colors should eventually darken after a week. They will grow rapidly at this point. It has been suggested however the hatchlings be confined in breeder nets or hatchery for awhile until they reach pea size. This way, they will not have to compete with the larger snails for foods. Most hatchlings die from starvation as they look around for food.

These snails prefer dead and decaying plant parts rather than the healthy plant specimens which make them perfectly suited for planted tank setups. They will appreciate fish foods and vegetable matter in their diet. Use calcium enriched foods to ensure their shells will not erode. The use of calcium pills, liquid calcium, cuttlefish bones, plaster of Paris pucks and eggshells is widely encouraged for healthy shell conditions. The pH must be maintained no lower than 7.0 as acidic water tends to erode the shells thus leaving the snail more susceptible to health issues, predatory attacks and even death.

They can be kept in most community setups but do not attempt to keep them with fish that have a voracious appetite for invertebrates, particularly loaches of the botiine genus and puffers. Be very careful when selecting their tankmates. Most fish are tempted to nip their eyes and antennae. While the snails have the ability to regenerate their lost body parts, it is not advisable to push through your plans to risk them with possibly nippy fish. They will only be stressed out severely from constant harassments.

If the fish can tolerate hard alkaline water aside from being passive over the snails, they may be your best options as most specimens from soft acidic waters become more prone to finrot once the water chemistry is altered.

References: www.applesnail.net

Edited by Lupin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I keep an apple snail in my 6 USg tank with 5 minnows, I bought a live plant when I got the snail but didn't realise when I got him how much they eat, within three days he had completely demolished the plant and there wasn't much left, presumably because I hadn't been feeding him often enough.

Now he gets cucumber, carrot and celery put onto chopsticks to make a snail kebab which i can wedge under stones, and he has a cuttlefish bone floating round the top which he seems to like. I also feed the minnows saki hikari sinking pellets the same as the goldfish and he'll snap them up too! I'm undecided as to whether or not to buy Mr I-Only-Eat-The-Dead-Bits another fresh plant to demolish, but he gets fed more now so maybe he'd do what he's supposed to...

From my limited experience they eat and poop like I've never seen in an aquarium! The bottom of the tank is almost permanently covered in little tiny dark pellets regardless of how often I clean it and it's bare-bottom so I can always see it...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I have two in my 6 gallon planted tank they never eat my live plants. I also never see poop and it is good for my plants.

Edited by Hidr
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Two or three times a week. Anything that sinks well work. (even sinking goldfish food) Or you can tie squash or something like that to a rock and they well eat that too.

I do it in the evening after lights out and the fish have settled down so they wont eat all of it before my snails get to it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I keep an apple snail in my 6 USg tank with 5 minnows, I bought a live plant when I got the snail but didn't realise when I got him how much they eat, within three days he had completely demolished the plant and there wasn't much left, presumably because I hadn't been feeding him often enough.

Sounds like you have a cana right there rather than a diffusa.:) What plant did it eat?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

It looked like the one floating around in Pigz1's tank in this thread

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/79988-my-tank/page__pid__891074__st__0entry891074

Not the curling pondweed stuff, the really fine-leafed one.

I looked up the canaliculata on applesnail.net (presumably that's what cana stands for?!) and it's shell is nothing like that, it's definitely more like the bridgesii, I'll try and get a decent photo of him later...maybe he hadn't been fed for a while at the pet shop? I know they don't keep real plants in their sale tanks...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Cana is indeed short for canaliculata. It is very rare for diffusas to resort on plants as their last food source although I can understand they will definitely go for ones with soft foliage but a lot of diffusas are known to starve themselves to death rather than resorting to plants when they are deprived of the food supply they needed most.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

My one wasn't going to starve to death for anyone! He literally sawed through the stems and the whole thing just disappeared into his mouth like feeding it into a wood chipper! He wasn't even just picking off the leaves! He gets fed every 2-3 days and has grown nearly an inch of extra shell in about a month so he can't be doing too badly... As long as he seems to be happy, healthy and active I'm not too bothered what type of snail he is :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...