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Jesi

Fish Floating On Side.

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[No idea, new to this, don't have test kit for that yet.]Ammonia Level?

[No idea, new to this, don't have test kit for that yet.]Nitrite Level?

[No idea, new to this, don't have test kit for that yet.]Nitrate level?

[Dark blue, 7.6 (Could be higher but my test only goes that high. I don't have test kit for KH, GH, and chloramines. I'll have to look for a test kit that measures those things.]Ph Level, Tank (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines)?

[Dark blue, 7.6 (Could be higher but my test only goes that high. I don't have test kit for KH, GH, and chloramines. I'll have to look for a test kit that measures those things.]Ph Level, Tap (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines)?

[API test kit, drops.]Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops?

[Fluctuates between 76 and 78 on average. Generally 76.]Water temperature?

[10 gallon, been going for a little over 2 weeks. Yes, I am fully aware that I'm apparently overstocked. But my local fishstore, as well as mmm and vvvv all said that a good general rule is 1 inch of fish per gallon and I'm well under that so... This is new to me that I'm overstocked at the moment.]Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running?

[Aquatech filtration system from nnnnnn. 5-15 gallon size. It's the one with the carbon filter as well as the biofiber insert. By the way, the biofiber insert cannot be replaced apparently, it says not to throw away and they don't sell replacments at nnnnnn, it was used for fish I had a year ago, was rinsed in hot water and stored, but I don't know if that's good or bad. Like I said, it says not to throw away and they don't have replacements, is that good or bad?]What is the name and size of the filter(s)?

[1 time every week. Sometimes more often if the water looks murky. Depends on how the water is looking, between 25 and 50% generally unless the tank gets really gross and needs a good cleaning after a few months, then I do about 80% but my tank is so new it's been lower amounts like 25 to 50%]How often do you change the water and how much?

[3 goldfish and a pleco. 3 goldfish are about an inch and a half in size. Pleco is about 2 inches.]How many fish in the tank and their size?

[Easy Balance with Nitraban and Aquasafe. As well as a pH fizzy tab by API because my LPS told me the pH was way too high and that's why my previous 2 fish died last week...]What kind of water additives or conditioners?

[Flake food twice a day and granules once a day with flakes, usually the morning feeding. Was not soaking them so I think my fish might be bound up from that.]What do you feed your fish and how often?

[No.]Any new fish added to the tank?

[No.]Any medications added to the tank?

[The fish that has the issue has a little bit of a tear in his back fin and a little bit of white frayish stuff on the one side of his belly that is always the side in the water, I think the fish in the tank were nipping at him last night when I went to sleep, was not like that at 3 am, and was at 10 when I got up.]Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt," bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus?

[Floating on one side all the time. Both sides of belly are definitely getting larger. This has been going on for 3 days now, he is still alive, and will swim around if disturbed or fed.]Any unusual behavior like staying at the bottom, not eating, etc.?

My fish is floating on one side. I am not new to aquariums nor this site, but I do still have a lot to learn. I know the basics, but just not enough apparently. I lost two fish last week due to unknown causes. LPS said it's because my pH is too high, so they told me to lower it, it will lower for a few minutes by adding the pH fizzy tabs or Aquasafe, but then right back up again. Not sure what's causing it. I have 3 plastic aquarium plants, some aquarium gravel. Some polished rocks from the craft section at nnnnnn, been using them for years, never seem to have had a problem, and some glass round "rocks" also from the craft section at nnnnnn. I've seen those in millions of fishtanks so I don't think they can be the problem. My fish is always floating on the same side, but he will swim if disturbed or fed. I think he may be bound up due to me not knowing enough about soaking granules.

I have no money until Friday so I can't buy too much, we literally have like $10. I will take a water sample to my LPS and see if they will write down my other levels of everything other than pH if that will help, but like I said, the fish is just a baby and I think it's bound up. I have no peas, read on here that will help, fed him some baby food prunes, hoping that will help. Other fish are nipping at him so I have him secluded in my big fish net in the water so they can't get to him, they are biting at the side of the belly that is always in the water and his tail. I submerged the net so the one side of his body isn't always exposed to air I know that's bad. I don't know anything but I don't think it could be egg bound I think it's too young, but instead of having a pretty much uniform size from front to back, both sides of belly are bulging and defined, so it's definitely something to do with that. I had 2 fish die last week for unknown causes, brand new tank and set up so I KNOW that ammonia couldn't have been a factor. LPS tested my pH first and left it at that saying my pH was way too high. I don't know what kind of test they used, but it was drops and it was probably API like mine, water was dark blue and on mine, dark blue is 7.6, and the higest it will go. I can get to the pet store later to have other things tested but like I said, the belly is the obvious issue, not sure what if any of the water's levels will hav anything to do with that. Please help, he's managed to stay alive for 3 days now like this, I don't want to give up hope! My LPS pretty much always tells me that if I have any sick fish, and they look like they're about to die, they will because there's not really a good way of knowing what's always wrong, so they basically want my fish to suffer and die. Probably so I'll buy more from there but I won't, I just go there to have my water tested. I know it's a bad place, they lost their license and all their reptiles a couple years ago due to lack of proper care or something, but got them all back somehow. Like I said, I don't buy their animals unless I know they're healthy or it's somethin that I can easily cure. The fish in question happens to be from vvvv. Was perfectly healthy when purchased.

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I just added 10 teaspoons of kosher salt as I just read on this site that that was ok. I have added salt before to my tanks but never this one and didn't know you could use anything other than aquarium salt, so I just salted to 0.1%. I don't know if that will help the fish in question at all, but it's done.

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You need to be doing daily partial water changes in a new tank. Not once a week. Your pH is absolutely fine and you should stop messing with that. pH down products are dangerous. Many people run their tanks very happily at pH 8 and above. Stable is the keyword for pH.

The rule of thumb is not one inch of fish to one gallon of water - it is 10 gallons per fancy fish no buts or ifs. Nipping is a sign of overcrowding. If you follow the advice of people who have kept fish sucessfully for years you will do better than trusting most LF store workers who are there for a few months often and then move on to something else. Their business is to sell fish, as many as they can.

The salt is fine but it needs to be and will only be effective in perfect water. Since you don't have test kits yet you should be doing 60-80% water changes daily to fix this and try to find a larger tank as soon as you can.

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Why would you do a daily water change in a new tank?

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Because the tank isn't cycled so the fish's waste is not being removed effectively. This causes accumulations of ammonia and nitrites which essentially poison the fish. Until 'good' bacteria have established themselves (they feed on ammonia and nitrites) you need to remove these things from the water yourself by doing water changes.

Edited by Chrissy_Bee

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Ok, so what does the filter do then? Anyone have any ideas what's wrong with my fish?

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Yes. Everyone has been trying to tell you. But you are not listening. The water is poisoning your fish.

It is chock full of ammonia that KILLS. You need to get it out fast and get some new ammonia free water in.

Fish release ammonia 24/7.

The filter takes approx 6 weeks to be of any use except as a filter for dirt and debris. the real function of the filter is to hold media where bacteria grow that help to convert the ammonia into less harmful products and keep the water safe.

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Uh, actually I am listening. I find it hard to believe that my water is poisoning my fish when I've been doing frequent water changes I'm sure that's the only possible reason right? Especially since he's been floating. The other fish are fine. And apparently a bulging stomach and lack of poop isn't the problem. So I'll just chalk it up to bad water, good idea. Thanks. I mean, in my own opinion, since I've done about 3 water changes in the past 2 days alone, he'd be better if it was an ammonia issue.

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Also...if it's 1 fish per 10 gallons...then how do you have any determination if the fish is growing huge that he would need a bigger tank? I mean obviously, like that one youtube video with the huge fish in the 10 gallon, that would be bad, but 1 fish per 10 gallons doesn't seem a very good rule of thumb when fish are all different sizes.

How do petstores keep their fish alive and healthy when their tanks are clearly overstocked?

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Ok, so what does the filter do then? Anyone have any ideas what's wrong with my fish?

Along with removing obvious big pieces of debris (left over food, etc.) the main function of an established filter is to provide a place for the benificial bacteria to grow, that is why you should never throw out all of your filter media at once.

High nitrates can cause floating and they tend to build up, that may be the issue in your tank but until you can test the water we can't be sure.

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[10 gallon, been going for a little over 2 weeks.

[1 time every week. Sometimes more often if the water looks murky.

Why would you do a daily water change in a new tank?

Uh, actually I am listening. I find it hard to believe that my water is poisoning my fish when I've been doing frequent water changes

Could you clarify which is correct? Are you doing water changes in your non cycled tank daily or not, Im confused.

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[10 gallon, been going for a little over 2 weeks.

[1 time every week. Sometimes more often if the water looks murky.

Why would you do a daily water change in a new tank?

Uh, actually I am listening. I find it hard to believe that my water is poisoning my fish when I've been doing frequent water changes

Could you clarify which is correct? Are you doing water changes in your non cycled tank daily or not, Im confused.

Not sure what's hard to figure out here. I change the water once a week unless it's murky or there's an issue like a sick fish. Right now I have an issue, so it's been daily. But I don't normally do a daily change in a new tank, or ever, unless there's a problem.

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You know you very much remind me of, well me when I first got into goldfish. I thought I could treat them just like tropicals. I had 9 in a 55 gallon tank lost them all within 2 months. :oops:

I did the goldfish in a bowl. I mean for crying out loud it was tiny is should of worked. Nope poor guy died too. :blink:

I even did the goldfish with tropicals in a 20 gallon tank. The goldfish lived about 6 months. :cry1

I even tried to take care of them just like tropicals. Water changes ever two weeks or so. No extra room. No extra filters. But they all died to soon for no reasons I could find.

However I knew about plecos eating off the slime of fish by having one with my oscar and seeing the pleco latch on to the side of my oscar and the two of them fighting. Plus those guys get up to 2 feet in a aquaruim up to 3 in a pond so never tried to keep them with my goldfish. Or at all except for my BN plecos. :unsure:

So take a deep breath throw out all you know about tropical fish and learn about the wonderful world of goldfish and their special needs. ;)

Good luck. :)

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Same here Hidr! I took over the care of my sister's 10 gallon tank with 5 goldies and a pleco. 3 of the fish slowly died of nitrite and nitrate related problems, and I had the horrific experience of seeing the pleco suddenly develop a taste for fish and eat the eyes out of one of them :cry

I have the whole story on my blog...but it was a bad experience to put it mildly!!

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Whatever the pleco is, it's not the kind that eat my fish. I've had this same kind of pleco for years and never had an issue. They don't even eat dead fish. The 3 local pet stores around me all use this type of pleco in most of their tanks.

Also, as far as my tanks being overstocked? All my fish have lived years. I had 2 feeder golds live over 10 years, and they only died because my mother had them for a while and didn't do water changes enough and they died. As far as my own tanks, all of my fish have lived a MINIMUM of 6 months, most of them at least 3 years. This is my first experience with 2 fish dying in only 2 days with a newly set up tank.

No I am not a newbie, but I don't not know all there is to know clearly you all do, right?

So I guess ammonia MUST be why my fish has a bloated belly. Funny because he pooped earlier (FINALLY) and his stomach is much smaller because I fed him some baby food prunes. I guess prunes kill ammonia or something. Haha! Also interesting that I had my water tested today, and once again, they tested every thing they could, said my tank needed to cycle a bit more but all my levels look GREAT! Only thing high is still pH, but you are all saying that's ok, so I'm not worried.

Pet store said same thing about my fish being bound up, said not to feed him for a couple days and see if he poops and his stomach gets smaller, well he did while I was gone, I had him in the net at the top of the tank and when I came back home to check on him a long string of poop that was white and brown was in there.

Thanks for the help though, but ammonia clearly wasn't the problem.

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You know you very much remind me of, well me when I first got into goldfish. I thought I could treat them just like tropicals. I had 9 in a 55 gallon tank lost them all within 2 months. :oops:

I did the goldfish in a bowl. I mean for crying out loud it was tiny is should of worked. Nope poor guy died too. :blink:

I even did the goldfish with tropicals in a 20 gallon tank. The goldfish lived about 6 months. :cry1

I even tried to take care of them just like tropicals. Water changes ever two weeks or so. No extra room. No extra filters. But they all died to soon for no reasons I could find.

However I knew about plecos eating off the slime of fish by having one with my oscar and seeing the pleco latch on to the side of my oscar and the two of them fighting. Plus those guys get up to 2 feet in a aquaruim up to 3 in a pond so never tried to keep them with my goldfish. Or at all except for my BN plecos. :unsure:

So take a deep breath throw out all you know about tropical fish and learn about the wonderful world of goldfish and their special needs. ;)

Good luck. :)

I know nothing about tropical fish, never had them, only goldfish. Thanks.

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So I guess ammonia MUST be why my fish has a bloated belly. Funny because he pooped earlier (FINALLY) and his stomach is much smaller because I fed him some baby food prunes. I guess prunes kill ammonia or something. Haha! Also interesting that I had my water tested today, and once again, they tested every thing they could, said my tank needed to cycle a bit more but all my levels look GREAT! Only thing high is still pH, but you are all saying that's ok, so I'm not worried.

You said in your other thread that

The guy only tested one thing, which was pH and said it was high and that MUST be the problem.

You continue to contradict yourself in what seems to be an effort to prove us wrong. Nobody is trying to make you look stupid or 'impress' you with their knowledge, we have only been trying to help as we do with all members. We never said definitively that ammonia was the issue with your fish, only that we suspected it was high, since you never posted all your water readings in the first place. Sarcasm is never appreciated. This is a friendly forum so please try to keep it that way.

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So I guess ammonia MUST be why my fish has a bloated belly. Funny because he pooped earlier (FINALLY) and his stomach is much smaller because I fed him some baby food prunes. I guess prunes kill ammonia or something. Haha! Also interesting that I had my water tested today, and once again, they tested every thing they could, said my tank needed to cycle a bit more but all my levels look GREAT! Only thing high is still pH, but you are all saying that's ok, so I'm not worried.

You said in your other thread that

The guy only tested one thing, which was pH and said it was high and that MUST be the problem.

You continue to contradict yourself in what seems to be an effort to prove us wrong. Nobody is trying to make you look stupid or 'impress' you with their knowledge, we have only been trying to help as we do with all members. We never said definitively that ammonia was the issue with your fish, only that we suspected it was high, since you never posted all your water readings in the first place. Sarcasm is never appreciated. This is a friendly forum so please try to keep it that way.

I'm not sure what you're talking about or trying to prove here...last weekend on FRIDAY we had them test the water and the guy only tested the pH said that must be the problem. Now TODAY I just had them test EVERYTHING and a different guy said the pH is high, but everything else looks fine. He said my tank needs to cycle more.

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I'm not sure what you're talking about or trying to prove here...last weekend on FRIDAY we had them test the water and the guy only tested the pH said that must be the problem. Now TODAY I just had them test EVERYTHING and a different guy said the pH is high, but everything else looks fine. He said my tank needs to cycle more.

If your tank needs to cycle more then that means that some of the water parameters are off, like you are still registering nitrites or ammonia. Ph levels have nothing to do with whether or not your tank has cycled yet. Frequent water changes, and a properly stocked tank are the only ways to help an uncycled tank. As for your bloated fish, peas are the best remedy for constipated goldfish. Prunes are very high in sugar. And white poo is a sign of an internal bacterial infection. Also, typing in all caps is considered to be like shouting, so if you would like help, I suggest you not shout at those who are only trying to help you.

Edited by Maceo

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I'm not sure what you're talking about or trying to prove here...last weekend on FRIDAY we had them test the water and the guy only tested the pH said that must be the problem. Now TODAY I just had them test EVERYTHING and a different guy said the pH is high, but everything else looks fine. He said my tank needs to cycle more.

If your tank needs to cycle more then that means that some of the water parameters are off, like you are still registering nitrites or ammonia. Ph levels have nothing to do with whether or not your tank has cycled yet. Frequent water changes, and a properly stocked tank are the only ways to help an uncycled tank. As for your bloated fish, peas are the best remedy for constipated goldfish. Prunes are very high in sugar. And white poo is a sign of an internal bacterial infection. Also, typing in all caps is considered to be like shouting, so if you would like help, I suggest you not shout at those who are only trying to help you.

I know pH has nothing to do with whether or not my tank is cycled, but he said there isn't a lot of the good bacteria in the tank yet, but all of my levels other than pH look fine to him and would not cause this bloating problem. I didn't have peas so I tried prunes, he did poop after that so it must have done something. How do I treat for an internal bacterial infection. I wouldn't have to shout if people would read, but they are going around reading different posts from different days like they're trying to "catch me" in a lie or something. I'm just trying to figure out why my fish is sick and people are jumping down my case about ammonia and overstocking when that isn't even the problem, obviously. Everyone I know says 1 inch of fish per gallon. Now on here people are saying 1 fish per 10 gallons of water, which yeah, sounds great, but also sounds stupid when you put in perspective the many different size of fish. I am fully aware that this setup will not be ok forever, but as of right now, it's just fine.

If anyone knows how to treat for a bacterial infection, I'll see what I can do to help this fish. Do I need to quarantine in a seperate tank? Will any meds harm the other fish? Do I need to remove the filter? What about the bio fiber insert that came with my filter?

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No one is trying to catch you at anything. We are just trying to get the information correct so that we can help you in the best way possible. And I wasn't saying the prunes wouldn't work I was just suggesting that in the future you would want to use peas because they are much healthier for your fish. The rule about 1 inch per gallon applies to tropical fish because they do not produce as much waste as goldfish. Goldfish need to have 10 gallons per fish because of the amount of waste they produce as well as the size to which they are capable of growing. As far as the possible bacterial problem, we will need to know your exact water parameters in order to be precise in helping you with a diagnosis and treatment. Getting the fish store guys to give you actual numbers instead of having them tell you it looks fine to them will help us help your fish. Medications can be very harmful to your fish if you have any ammonia or nitrites in your water or even high nitrates.

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Everyone here has been being as nice as they possibly could..... trying hard to help you and your fish. I, however, am not nice. I am a cranky, crabby old lady, and I get to post up pretty much what I want. I see some real problems in your posts ..... ones that others have tried, diplomatically, to resolve - with no success.

If we were a more skeptical board, it would be suspected that you are what is commonly called a "troll" - someone who posts on a board simply to try to cause problems. Most people come here with questions and are willing to at least entertain the idea that most others here know a bit about what they are talking about. Why did you come here if you are not even willing to entertain the idea that we have some information to help you?

Goldfish excete more waste, ounce for ounce of fish, than nearly any other aquatic organism on the planet Earth. Because of this, if they are kept in a finite volume of water (ie: a tank or tub or small pond), they need much GREATER volume of water than another type of fish of equal size. The rule of thumb for this is approximately 10 gallons per fish. This is the MINIMUM.

Yes, there are OLD OLD books out on the market that still quote the "one gallon per inch" suggestion. Those books were not written by a goldfish keeper, they were written by a general fish keeper. They are the books that were written for "generalized animal care - fish." If you wish to actually find a "REAL" book on goldfish, you need to read something that was written by someone who actually keeps, breeds, shows and grooms fish.

When you have a fish sitting in a small volume of water, the water can foul quickly. The waste is not necessarily visible. When you only change the water out (100%? or less?) every week, you are only reducing the volume of the waste a small amount (if you do a partial change) or for a brief period (if you do 100%).

Try placing your 3 year old daughter (Minus her diaper - or since she is potty trained - just let her be) into a 10 foot wading pool full of 24 inches of water. Leave her there for a week. Make sure you dip all her food into the water and make her drink the water. Do you think she will remain healthy for long? Even if you do change out all the water at the end of the week, I bet she will not spontaneously become healthy again for you. This would be criminally actionable! - something a mother would NEVER EVER do - but keeping fish in a tiny volume of water can be likened to this type of horrific care.

Your fish has been poisoned by poor water quality. It will not just "miraculously heal" because you change out some water now and then.

Fish stores are used to seeing some ammonia in test water... hense the quote "needs a bit more cycling" with your water test. For your average little tropical fish, the cycle will often kick in before the fish dies of toxic water. (key word being "often" - but not always). Fish stores do not necessarily understand about fancy goldfish. In many stores you will see them kept in too high a concentration - too little water. Many stores do not care - the fish are relatively cheap to get - and it would cost more to house them properly. So they just pull out the dead ones often enough that the public rarely sees them - and go with it. Other, more reputable stores, will have an "open system". This means all the tanks are chained together - with a large volume of water behind the scenes. 50 ten gallon tanks (50 gallons) plus 500 gallon filter in the back equal 550 gallons - a sufficiant volume of water in most cases.

Goldfish have been kept for 1000s of years. They are one of the OLDEST "domesticated" creatures on this planet. They are NOT short lived - 3 years of age is barely into adulthood. The care measures we recommend are ones that have been used for thousands of years. You, on the other hand, cannot seem to decide whether you are "new to this" or not.... one post says one thing, the next says something different. I would suggest that if you cannot keep your fish alive for longer than 6 months to 3 years, you are not doing something right!

You have a wealth of information on fish and their proper care available to you in the internet. There are tons of forums on fish care and goldfish care out there. You will not find a SINGLE one that is going to differ much from what we are telling you. If you are sooooooo sure you are right on how to care for the fish, why come here? If you are willing to learn, then you are welcome. Otherwise, do not waste our time. Most other forums would not have been so kind, nor would they have spent the time in attempting to help you. Many will not even answer questions until you have read ALL the basics and tried them......

Your fish have been seriously injured. The more obviously injured one(s) will not survive. The others, because of a bit more immunity or something, are not dying, YET. If enough fish die, and the tank eventually cycles (though you will never know when, if you do not test it) you may get one to live. It will never grow large, never thrive and will not live 20 years, though.

The definition of insanity is doing something and, when it does not work, doing it again and again and again, hoping for different results each time. The defintion of stupidity may be along that same line, too. You are doing the same thing to your fish and they have always died young. The fish is not living well..... they are dying. You have been given the information to help the fish - if not this set of fish, but your next ones, but you refuse to listen or use that information. That is pretty stupid in my opinion.

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Everyone here has been being as nice as they possibly could..... trying hard to help you and your fish. I, however, am not nice. I am a cranky, crabby old lady, and I get to post up pretty much what I want. I see some real problems in your posts ..... ones that others have tried, diplomatically, to resolve - with no success.

If we were a more skeptical board, it would be suspected that you are what is commonly called a "troll" - someone who posts on a board simply to try to cause problems. Most people come here with questions and are willing to at least entertain the idea that most others here know a bit about what they are talking about. Why did you come here if you are not even willing to entertain the idea that we have some information to help you?

Goldfish excete more waste, ounce for ounce of fish, than nearly any other aquatic organism on the planet Earth. Because of this, if they are kept in a finite volume of water (ie: a tank or tub or small pond), they need much GREATER volume of water than another type of fish of equal size. The rule of thumb for this is approximately 10 gallons per fish. This is the MINIMUM.

Yes, there are OLD OLD books out on the market that still quote the "one gallon per inch" suggestion. Those books were not written by a goldfish keeper, they were written by a general fish keeper. They are the books that were written for "generalized animal care - fish." If you wish to actually find a "REAL" book on goldfish, you need to read something that was written by someone who actually keeps, breeds, shows and grooms fish.

When you have a fish sitting in a small volume of water, the water can foul quickly. The waste is not necessarily visible. When you only change the water out (100%? or less?) every week, you are only reducing the volume of the waste a small amount (if you do a partial change) or for a brief period (if you do 100%).

Try placing your 3 year old daughter (Minus her diaper - or since she is potty trained - just let her be) into a 10 foot wading pool full of 24 inches of water. Leave her there for a week. Make sure you dip all her food into the water and make her drink the water. Do you think she will remain healthy for long? Even if you do change out all the water at the end of the week, I bet she will not spontaneously become healthy again for you. This would be criminally actionable! - something a mother would NEVER EVER do - but keeping fish in a tiny volume of water can be likened to this type of horrific care.

Your fish has been poisoned by poor water quality. It will not just "miraculously heal" because you change out some water now and then.

Fish stores are used to seeing some ammonia in test water... hense the quote "needs a bit more cycling" with your water test. For your average little tropical fish, the cycle will often kick in before the fish dies of toxic water. (key word being "often" - but not always). Fish stores do not necessarily understand about fancy goldfish. In many stores you will see them kept in too high a concentration - too little water. Many stores do not care - the fish are relatively cheap to get - and it would cost more to house them properly. So they just pull out the dead ones often enough that the public rarely sees them - and go with it. Other, more reputable stores, will have an "open system". This means all the tanks are chained together - with a large volume of water behind the scenes. 50 ten gallon tanks (50 gallons) plus 500 gallon filter in the back equal 550 gallons - a sufficiant volume of water in most cases.

Goldfish have been kept for 1000s of years. They are one of the OLDEST "domesticated" creatures on this planet. They are NOT short lived - 3 years of age is barely into adulthood. The care measures we recommend are ones that have been used for thousands of years. You, on the other hand, cannot seem to decide whether you are "new to this" or not.... one post says one thing, the next says something different. I would suggest that if you cannot keep your fish alive for longer than 6 months to 3 years, you are not doing something right!

You have a wealth of information on fish and their proper care available to you in the internet. There are tons of forums on fish care and goldfish care out there. You will not find a SINGLE one that is going to differ much from what we are telling you. If you are sooooooo sure you are right on how to care for the fish, why come here? If you are willing to learn, then you are welcome. Otherwise, do not waste our time. Most other forums would not have been so kind, nor would they have spent the time in attempting to help you. Many will not even answer questions until you have read ALL the basics and tried them......

Your fish have been seriously injured. The more obviously injured one(s) will not survive. The others, because of a bit more immunity or something, are not dying, YET. If enough fish die, and the tank eventually cycles (though you will never know when, if you do not test it) you may get one to live. It will never grow large, never thrive and will not live 20 years, though.

The definition of insanity is doing something and, when it does not work, doing it again and again and again, hoping for different results each time. The defintion of stupidity may be along that same line, too. You are doing the same thing to your fish and they have always died young. The fish is not living well..... they are dying. You have been given the information to help the fish - if not this set of fish, but your next ones, but you refuse to listen or use that information. That is pretty stupid in my opinion.

I could care less what you post if you're just going to be nasty. I am not a "troll" I have better things to do with my time than sit an a web forum like you probably do all day and cause trouble. I have a 7 month old baby and a 3 year old and I'm just trying to save my kid's fish thanks. I don't appreciate people jumping down my back trying to "catch me in a lie" telling me I'm contradicting myself. How about instead of trying to prove me wrong (Ok, I'm wrong, whatever, just trying to save a freakin' family pet, but obviously, my water is way more important than my dying fish at the moment.) help me and my fish. Who, by the way, now has white fungus growing on his side where he is floating down. Thanks for your help though, by the way, it's good to know that miserable people like you already have one foot in the grave.

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Everyone here has been being as nice as they possibly could..... trying hard to help you and your fish. I, however, am not nice. I am a cranky, crabby old lady, and I get to post up pretty much what I want. I see some real problems in your posts ..... ones that others have tried, diplomatically, to resolve - with no success.

If we were a more skeptical board, it would be suspected that you are what is commonly called a "troll" - someone who posts on a board simply to try to cause problems. Most people come here with questions and are willing to at least entertain the idea that most others here know a bit about what they are talking about. Why did you come here if you are not even willing to entertain the idea that we have some information to help you?

Goldfish excete more waste, ounce for ounce of fish, than nearly any other aquatic organism on the planet Earth. Because of this, if they are kept in a finite volume of water (ie: a tank or tub or small pond), they need much GREATER volume of water than another type of fish of equal size. The rule of thumb for this is approximately 10 gallons per fish. This is the MINIMUM.

Yes, there are OLD OLD books out on the market that still quote the "one gallon per inch" suggestion. Those books were not written by a goldfish keeper, they were written by a general fish keeper. They are the books that were written for "generalized animal care - fish." If you wish to actually find a "REAL" book on goldfish, you need to read something that was written by someone who actually keeps, breeds, shows and grooms fish.

When you have a fish sitting in a small volume of water, the water can foul quickly. The waste is not necessarily visible. When you only change the water out (100%? or less?) every week, you are only reducing the volume of the waste a small amount (if you do a partial change) or for a brief period (if you do 100%).

Try placing your 3 year old daughter (Minus her diaper - or since she is potty trained - just let her be) into a 10 foot wading pool full of 24 inches of water. Leave her there for a week. Make sure you dip all her food into the water and make her drink the water. Do you think she will remain healthy for long? Even if you do change out all the water at the end of the week, I bet she will not spontaneously become healthy again for you. This would be criminally actionable! - something a mother would NEVER EVER do - but keeping fish in a tiny volume of water can be likened to this type of horrific care.

Your fish has been poisoned by poor water quality. It will not just "miraculously heal" because you change out some water now and then.

Fish stores are used to seeing some ammonia in test water... hense the quote "needs a bit more cycling" with your water test. For your average little tropical fish, the cycle will often kick in before the fish dies of toxic water. (key word being "often" - but not always). Fish stores do not necessarily understand about fancy goldfish. In many stores you will see them kept in too high a concentration - too little water. Many stores do not care - the fish are relatively cheap to get - and it would cost more to house them properly. So they just pull out the dead ones often enough that the public rarely sees them - and go with it. Other, more reputable stores, will have an "open system". This means all the tanks are chained together - with a large volume of water behind the scenes. 50 ten gallon tanks (50 gallons) plus 500 gallon filter in the back equal 550 gallons - a sufficiant volume of water in most cases.

Goldfish have been kept for 1000s of years. They are one of the OLDEST "domesticated" creatures on this planet. They are NOT short lived - 3 years of age is barely into adulthood. The care measures we recommend are ones that have been used for thousands of years. You, on the other hand, cannot seem to decide whether you are "new to this" or not.... one post says one thing, the next says something different. I would suggest that if you cannot keep your fish alive for longer than 6 months to 3 years, you are not doing something right!

You have a wealth of information on fish and their proper care available to you in the internet. There are tons of forums on fish care and goldfish care out there. You will not find a SINGLE one that is going to differ much from what we are telling you. If you are sooooooo sure you are right on how to care for the fish, why come here? If you are willing to learn, then you are welcome. Otherwise, do not waste our time. Most other forums would not have been so kind, nor would they have spent the time in attempting to help you. Many will not even answer questions until you have read ALL the basics and tried them......

Your fish have been seriously injured. The more obviously injured one(s) will not survive. The others, because of a bit more immunity or something, are not dying, YET. If enough fish die, and the tank eventually cycles (though you will never know when, if you do not test it) you may get one to live. It will never grow large, never thrive and will not live 20 years, though.

The definition of insanity is doing something and, when it does not work, doing it again and again and again, hoping for different results each time. The defintion of stupidity may be along that same line, too. You are doing the same thing to your fish and they have always died young. The fish is not living well..... they are dying. You have been given the information to help the fish - if not this set of fish, but your next ones, but you refuse to listen or use that information. That is pretty stupid in my opinion.

And by the way, my fish dying at 3 years didn't just happen unexpectedly, the reasons they happened were obvious and nothing I could control, moron.

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