Jump to content

Any Advice For Better Quality Food


Guest Christo7

Recommended Posts

Guest Christo7

Hi been looking for good quality food on eBay UK.

I'm aware when it comes to food the number one brands are Hikari, Tetra Fin Gold and Nishi Koi. But does anyone know of good quality branded/unbranded food out there that may not be as expensive but still does a good job. Hopefully if it is an Far Eastern brand or US brand I may be able to find it on the UK eBay. Also if I have to I will buy Tetrafin gold japan 55grams, does anyone know how long it should last me for approximately? Got 3 small fish.

Thanks for reading and appreciate any comments or advice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

The most recent food that I've begun to purchase and I think I will stick with for a while is Saki-Hikari Fancy Goldfish Food.

It's a sinking pellet that's pretty small in size, made for easy digestion and is supposed to enhance the intestinal flora of the fish.

My goldfish absolutely love it, it's a good size for both large and small fish, and it doesn't seem to produce as gigantic a fish poo as progold does.

(Which I hope translates into the goldfish digesting the food more efficiently.)

I purchased my most recent lot from ebay here in the states, so I'm thinking you should be able to find it on ebay.co.uk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Christo7

yes i know this is proably the best brand and therefore i understand the huge price tag.

anyway can anyone check this cheaper food out for me from ebay uk:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Tiny-pellet-Koi-Gold...%3A1%7C294%3A50

it doesn't list the ingredients so i'm a bit hesistant whether to but it or not. i know its got high protein % but its unbranded and could contain all that nasty junk foods like cereals as its main ingredient.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Christo7

p.s. i know its alll about protein % in foods but thats useless if it hasn't got a good digestion formula, i'm use to seeing long strands off poo from high protein % pellets

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Well, the things that make me think about that food you are having your eyes on, Christo, is the fact that it is floating, plus it has 3 mm in diameter. I would avoid floating pellets as much as I can for goldfish, unless yours are single tails. Floating food and fancy goldfish don't do so well together. I have used floating foods before, and it didn't matter how much I soaked it and squeezed the pellets before I fed them, they still kept floating. That food is better made for koi and single tails in the pond, not for fancies.

Plus 3 mm is already quite some size. Again, better made for bigger fish. Hubby fed his baby koi with big pellets like that, but he crumbled the pellets in a plastic container with a hammer. But again, those were koi babies with a different body shape and not prone to floating issues.

With the "homemade" pellets like that, espeically without the ingredients listed, there is often a lot of junk in it. Maybe you can ask the seller for the ingredients and see if he is willing to give it to you. They sometimes act secretive, not to give away "their miracle ingredient" for better fish health, when in reality its the junk they want to hide. A lot of grinded fish stuff like bones, meal or even corn, I would be careful.

Ask him and see what you get out of him.... I know its always tempting to go for cheaper food. It might be good for a while, or as an emergency stash if the good stuff runs out. But in general, I would rather spend a bit more on food, and know that it is a better quality. You can always supplement your fish with some frozen things as well to stretch the expensive food some - any kind of brine shrimp, bloodworms and whatever not hops around in the freezer section of the pet store. Peas are cheap too, or making a batch of gelfood with all kinds of goodies - and tossing in a few pellets of the good food. I always found tons of ways to work oround being tempted by cheaper food.

My personal golden rule - if there are the words "floating" on the package, I don't even look at the rest of the food anymore. I don't buy it. Only exception - Goldfishconnection's floating seafood flakes. Those flakes sink within seconds of hitting the water, and are just wonderful! :heart

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Christo7

wow thanks for you lengthy reply!

but floating seems to be alright as my fish have been feeding on hikari oranda gold floating pellets. as for the main ingredient i hope its some sort of meal like shrimp/krill mean rather than a cereal (cereals are junk food i read).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

If you do feed floating soak it and get the air out before you feed. Floating pellets can cause some problems. Maybe not today maybe not tomorrow but as some point it can.

Same with flake food. Soak first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

It is not just floating foods that would be an issue. Most foods yield a lot of starch based ingredients responsible for the buoyancy issues. The bacteria lining the digestive system digest the starch but at the same time, produce gas that gets trapped in the GI tract causing buoyancy issues. I use Hikari Lionhead along with natural foods such as aquarium plants and then gel food recipes for my fish. You could try the Mazuri gel foods if available in your area.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Christo7

Well I bought a 100gram packet of hikari oranda gold about a year ago and its still lasted me till this day. I've got 3 small fishes. im still feeding them the same packet till this day, bit concerned about the freshness but its worked out to be great value.

Am I feeding too little or does a 100gram packet last this long usually?

thanks

chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
Well I bought a 100gram packet of hikari oranda gold about a year ago and its still lasted me till this day. I've got 3 small fishes. im still feeding them the same packet till this day, bit concerned about the freshness but its worked out to be great value.

Am I feeding too little or does a 100gram packet last this long usually?

thanks

chris

Actually with young goldies, I feed mine almost 4-5 times a day so with a 100g along with other foods, a 100g sachet alone would last me a month or two only. I dispose anything already opened and beyond four months prior to using as the vitamins by now would be destroyed from series of air and light exposures.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Guest Lawrence

I use Pro-Gold but if this 'Saki-Hikari Fancy Goldfish" is better, I will get it this weekend. What do you guys think?

Edited by Lawrence
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

It certainly will work but like other commercial foods, it's low in fiber so I'd keep it as a portion of the total diet and add vegetable matter with high fiber or gel foods with vegetables, fish (sardines/mackerel/tuna) and everything else added. If you're interested with gel food recipes, let me know.:) I also use Mazuri 5M70 for young goldfish but again, it's low in fiber.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
Sure, I am interested. Thanks.

Here's what I did.:)

Ingredients

3-6 4 oz jars of baby food (any brand and flavor as long as appropriate; I use Gerber)

2-3 calcium pills (optional; I use Caltrate)

1-2 tablespoons of fish food (optional; I use Hikari Lionhead)

2-3 sachets of unflavored gelatin (Knox is best.)

1 can of sardines/mackerel/tuna (90 grams I believe)

1 acidophilus tablet (optional; recommended for fancy goldfish who may have buoyancy issues)

1 multivitamins

Equipments

Microwave oven

Mortar and pestle or blender

Microwave container or bowl

1 tablespoon

1 fork

Cookie pans

A roll of wax paper

Instructions

1. Pound tablets first and then mix with baby foods.

2. Wash the fish (sardines/mackerel/tuna) to remove the tomato sauce completely.

3. Mix no. 1 and no. 2 together.

4. Boil water in the pot. Pour the gelatin in there and keep stirring.

5. Pour no. 3 into a microwaveable container and set microwave at medium and keep it on for a minute or two.

6. While waiting, wrap the cookie pan with wax paper.

7. Open the oven and get the bowl out of it.

8. Pour the thick into the cookie pans and make sure you get 1/4 inch thick of mix. If the mix seems to settle separately, stir it again with a tablespoon or fork.

9. Once done, place the cookie pans inside your fridge.

Wait for a few hours until the gel food thickens. Make sure beforehand the mixture is thick, not too runny. If it is runny, you are adding too much water and very little gelatin powder, in this case add more gelatin, spread it around on the thick and stir. Pour a little boiling water or rather place it in a microwave oven again and wait for another minute.

I forgot we do have a list here.

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/2269-gel-food/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Lawrence
Sure, I am interested. Thanks.

Here's what I did. :)

Ingredients

3-6 4 oz jars of baby food (any brand and flavor as long as appropriate; I use Gerber)

2-3 calcium pills (optional; I use Caltrate)

1-2 tablespoons of fish food (optional; I use Hikari Lionhead)

2-3 sachets of unflavored gelatin (Knox is best.)

1 can of sardines/mackerel/tuna (90 grams I believe)

1 acidophilus tablet (optional; recommended for fancy goldfish who may have buoyancy issues)

1 multivitamins

Equipments

Microwave oven

Mortar and pestle or blender

Microwave container or bowl

1 tablespoon

1 fork

Cookie pans

A roll of wax paper

Instructions

1. Pound tablets first and then mix with baby foods.

2. Wash the fish (sardines/mackerel/tuna) to remove the tomato sauce completely.

3. Mix no. 1 and no. 2 together.

4. Boil water in the pot. Pour the gelatin in there and keep stirring.

5. Pour no. 3 into a microwaveable container and set microwave at medium and keep it on for a minute or two.

6. While waiting, wrap the cookie pan with wax paper.

7. Open the oven and get the bowl out of it.

8. Pour the thick into the cookie pans and make sure you get 1/4 inch thick of mix. If the mix seems to settle separately, stir it again with a tablespoon or fork.

9. Once done, place the cookie pans inside your fridge.

Wait for a few hours until the gel food thickens. Make sure beforehand the mixture is thick, not too runny. If it is runny, you are adding too much water and very little gelatin powder, in this case add more gelatin, spread it around on the thick and stir. Pour a little boiling water or rather place it in a microwave oven again and wait for another minute.

I forgot we do have a list here.

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/2269-gel-food/

Thanks a lot. I think my wife will be glad to do this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also really like the Saki-Hikari brand myself. I started giving it to my koi initially and it worked well. I tried the medium sized koi pellets on my full grown goldfish and it also was well tolerated. The Saki-Hikari brand for Koi comes in three varieties and they all float but have not given any of my fish any problems. I was initially mixing the Color Enhancing and Growth variety together but am currently just giving the Growth variety to the goldfish. Two of my older goldfish developed dropsy due to kidney failure. I attributed this to the high protein and vitamin enriched Color Enhancing food.

I had a harder time finding the Fancy Goldfish Variety locally but started ordering it from EBay from a pet store here in California. I have tried many different types of foods and agree that the Fancy Goldfish variety is the best commercially prepared food in the market currently. It is even better than their other varieties due to the reasons others have already mentioned. I am using a self-feeder and feed them the Fancy Goldfish as their main staple with the Growth Variety in small amounts several times a day.

However, I also agree that adding fiber is very important. I don?t feed them vegetables because the fish live in a planted aquarium and are free to nibble on the plants all day. I also supplement their diet by feeding them frozen brine shrimp and blood worms daily. There are also frozen goldfish foods that mix all these together but my goldfish won?t eat them.

All these foods are expensive unfortunately. Less expensive varieties are not as good and are prone to give digestive problems. The other Hikari varieties are all right and readily available. The ProGold variety is also good and available on the internet. You can also make it by yourself using the great many recipes provided on this site but I have found it to be too time consuming to prepare.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...