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Problems With Snails


Aftran

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Okay, so I was at school for 2 months, and unintentially my entire cycle was messed up because of overfeeding of my fish. :thud It's sort of under control now, I've done two water changes, cleaned the filter, blah blah, hehe.

But I noticed that a lot of my snails had died (I had like 12, I think they're mystery snails), and when I retrieved their shells from the tank they just sort of crumbled in my hand. Also, on the living snails, it looks like their shells are just sort of....rotting away.

I did some reading online, and I think my pH is too low, but I really don't know, so I'm hoping for some advice from those who do. I've had many snails in the past, but never this problem.

pH: 6.6

Ammonia: .25

Nitrite: 0

Nitrate: 0

The fish are slightly lathargic, but all things considered I'm not really surprised. Poor babies.

Thanks in advance.

-Tabi

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Just a cup or two at a time. You can add it to your gravel or put it in your filter. You want to change the Ph as slow as possible. Not sure where you might find it I had to order it last time I used it. I use shells in my filter and for decorations. It well dissolve/crumble in time. Is that the word I want? Any ways so I have to add some ever 6 months or so.

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the snails need calcium and a steady pH of 7 or more, which the crushed coral mentioned by Hidr can provide. without the calcium their shells will fall apart like that. :( sorry you lost so many snails!

The most important thing to remember is that the rigidity of the shell is provided by a strong, calcified inside, with a protective protein layer at the outside. It's the latter that prevents the chemical detoriation of the calcium at the inside. Once the protective outer layer is damaged, the calcium layer is exposed to the water. This shouldn't be a big problem, as long as the water is rich in calcium and is not acid, but once the pH of the water drops and the water becomes acid (pH below 7), the calciums starts to dissolve. link

and you might want to get some additional help for your fish if you are still battling a low pH and they are still lathargic? :)

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Thank you everyone for your support!

I found the coral at nnnn online, but unfortunately it is going to have to wait a few weeks for payday.

I did some testing and the pH coming out of the tap is 6.6, which explains why no one around here likes to drink it....

Since I posted I've done another water change and replaced some old media in my filter. The snails are a little more active, and the fish are MUCH happier!

I'm looking into replacing the foam pads in my canister, and found them way cheaper online, so hopefully I'll be able to do that soon also. I probably won't be getting any more snails anytime soon, but who knows. If I can get it all sorted out I'll need a reason to use the crushed coral, lol.

Again, thanks! :D

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Okay, small update. :)

Everyone seems to be doing a little better, more active, seems they like me again.

I just ordered some coral from Big Al's, but what should I do for calcium?

I've found Kent's Liquid Calcium, but it says that it is for marine tanks. Can it still be used in freshwater?

When I talked to my lfs they also mentioned cuttlebone. What exactly is it and is it better/worse than liquid calcium?

Also, once I get the calcium, should I add it before or after the coral? Does it matter?

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When I had snail's I used the Kent's. It's safe for fresh water.

You'll probably need to add the calcium after each water change. I always added a few drops back after each change. The coral will stay in your tank for many months until it can no longer act as a buffer.

Edited by gunbunnyj
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Okay, small update. :)

Everyone seems to be doing a little better, more active, seems they like me again.

When I talked to my lfs they also mentioned cuttlebone. What exactly is it and is it better/worse than liquid calcium?

I use cuttlebone for my Mystery Snails. I just break them up and drop into the tank. They tend to float at first but will finally sink.

Mine's shells do fine but I also have hard water from a well so they may not work as well in soft water.

Wikipedia: Cuttlebone Top Home > Library > Miscellaneous > Wikipedia180px-Cuttlebone.jpg magnify-clip.pngCuttlebone from Sepia sp.Cuttlebone, also known as cuttlefish bone, is a hard, brittle internal structure found in all members of the family Sepiidae, commonly known as cuttlefish.

Cuttlebone is composed primarily of calcium carbonate. It is a chambered, gas-filled shell used for buoyancy control. The microscopic structure of cuttlebone consists of narrow layers connected by numerous upright pillars.

Depending on the species, cuttlebones implode at a depth of between 200 and 600 m. Because of this limitation, most species of cuttlefish live on the seafloor in shallow water, usually on the continental shelf.[1]

Human uses

Today, cuttlebones are commonly used as calcium-rich dietary supplements for caged birds, hermit crabs, and turtles.[2] Some parakeet owners use cuttlebones as a beak sharpener.

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