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Hidr

I So Want One Of These.

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*drool*

O

My

Gosh

They are soooo priittty..........I want one. Like really really badly.

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i kind of just want to steal their caudals and put them on my fish :krazy::krazy::krazy:

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What are they supposed to be? They look like veil tails from what I see. Very pretty though.

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All I know is you can't get them here in the US. There was a breeder once that was breeding the Philadelphia veiltails but his website has gone poof and they were not near as long finned as those are. And you couldn't buy them.

Can any read that and tell us what they are?

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What are they supposed to be? They look like veil tails from what I see. Very pretty though.

It calls them "Bristol shubunkin."

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Really? :o

I have never seen any that look like that. And they appear to me to be double tails not single.

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What are they supposed to be? They look like veil tails from what I see. Very pretty though.

It calls them "Bristol shubunkin."

That's what I was going to say. You can see it on some of them better than others. Bristols you can tell by the heart shape of the tail. It's a long, heart shaped tail. Bristols are very British. Many gorgeous ones come from there. Bristol Aquarists Society

Really? :o

I have never seen any that look like that. And they appear to me to be double tails not single.

Nah, they just look double cuz they're so "fluffy!"

Edited by Lynda Von G

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They look sort of like Bristols, but are Japanese Shonai (or Syounai). Those in the video are really exceptional.

-steve

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Wow! Only in my dreams. These fish have the longest fins I have ever seen, and I am a sucker for nice fins!

Thanks for sharing.

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These ones are more vigorous (although to be fair, the first vid above shows fish that seem to be stressed from being entered in a fish show while these calicos are obviously in an established tank)

http://video.aol.com/video-detail/-14-love...cid=VIDURVPET02

maybe i'm :wacko: , but isn't that the same video as the one on post #1?

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Ya it is the same one. lol Maybe he meant to link one of the others on that same page?

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Well anyways, sure the fish look stressed. My fish which are healthy would behave like that too if I took them out of their normal tank, moved them across town, put them in a strange tank (most likley smaller than the home tank), with different water, no/little decorations, and all these people walking around the tank snapping pictures and creating strange/new vibrations. I think I will cut these beauties some slack :twocents

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:druel:thud <- that about sums it up!

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Fish that are "snagged, bagged and dragged" rarely have any problems - as long as reasonable care is exersised in the doing. Show fish - VALUABLE fish - are just fine. These fish are active. They hold their fins up and are alert and healthy looking. I see no problems. If I had to hazard a guess, they were raised and kept in a MUCH larger volume of water - a pond most likely. Theya re just little guys, too. Pond fish often react at being placed in a small, clear sided tank with over-activity at the edge of the glass. They are not stressed, particularly, but are simply reacting to a different environment.

Those are really pretty. I wish mine looked anywhere near that lovely.

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I agree Daryl. They pretty good to me. Funny about show fish... You never know how well it will display for the judges until the time comes. And, exhibiting personality and "presence" really helps its chances when the judges are evaluating.

-steve

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They look sort of like Bristols, but are Japanese Shonai (or Syounai). Those in the video are really exceptional.

-steve

I was very interested in this possibility and wanted to know more about Shonai, so I did some research on them. After this research, I'm not so sure that these fish are, after all, Shonai. Here is the information that I found as posted by Tom Donald from the Koi Reflections forum:

"When I first heard about the Japanese singletail Syonai (Shonai), I was a bit puzzled. At first glance the Shonai looks just like a Comet, so I was compelled to do a little research to try and sort out why it was that two singletails that appeared to be the same, had two different names. The Japanese language barrier did not help, but eventually I was able to put together enough pieces of the puzzle that a reasonbly clear picture began to emerge.

The Sabao group of Japanese singletail goldfish (Sabao, Tamasaba, Fukudaruma) with their short round bodies, evolved from an original cross between Shonai and Ryukin. I was told that Shonai was like Comet, but different.

Shonai and Comet look similar, or the same, so what is different about them? These two goldfish forms appear to have evolved simultaneously, but in two very different parts of the world. Their form is very similar, with slender body and long fins, but their ancestry is quite different.

Turns out that both originated in the late 1800's, but not in the same place. The Comet is credited as an American creation, first bred as a "sport" or chance occurance, from regular "common" goldfish, or Hibuna, stock. The Comet went on to be one of the most well known and abundant of all goldfish in North America, familiar to many as "feeder goldfish". Fortunately many of us value them for the wonderfull pond fish that they are.

But Shonai was created in a completely different way, in the northwest region of Japan's main island, from a cross between the native Gibel carp (the ancestor of ALL goldfish) to an early form of the Oranda goldfish. The resulting Shonai was then selectively bred for cold tolerence inherited from the native carp, and had intense red color on the upper half of the body, with a white underbelly.

So, how does one tell Comet from Shonai these days? Apparantly only by knowing the origin, or genetics, of the individual. It seems there are only a few breeders of Shonai that remain, in the Yamagata region of Japan. So, if an individual fish in question was imported from one of these few remaining breeders, or bred from their stock, it'll be a Shonai (Syonai). If not, then it will be a Comet. It's all in the pedigree breeding (genetic makeup) of the individual. Also, the genes for wen developement on the head of the early form of Oranda still exists in the pure Shonai population, some individuals may still develope this trait, which will not be seen on a pure Comet."

He goes on to say:

"Shonai was developed by crossing what was called the "Dutch lionhead" to the native Japanese Gibel carp. This would have been a backcross to the original wild carp from which all goldfish derived, rather than an outcross to a different form of carp. From this cross, vigor, agility, and cold tolerance would have been inherited from the native carp.

As for the Dutch lionhead, well, hard to know for sure what they looked like over a hundred years ago, but my guess is they would have been similar to what is called the Japanese Nagate Oranda today. I believe the Dutch lionhead was the Chinese Oranda originally brought to Japan from China by Dutch sailing traders, and would likely not have been the exaggerated body form and head growth that we know today.."

So, it sounds like shonai is not necessarily a specific shape of fish (although there is inference to very slight oranda type stylings and he did reference pictures of some with wens but I couldn't see the pics as I'm not a member!), but moreso indicates the region it came from. Sort of like champagne. Even though there are many vintners that produce a bubbling/sparkling wine, they are not allowed to call it "champagne" unless it specifically came from the region in France named "Champagne."

Nonetheless, the tails on these fish are absolutely stunning!

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Thank you for looking that up. That is very interesting. However I have never seen a commet with a tail like that.

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These ones are more vigorous (although to be fair, the first vid above shows fish that seem to be stressed from being entered in a fish show while these calicos are obviously in an established tank)

http://video.aol.com/video-detail/-14-love...cid=VIDURVPET02

maybe i'm :wacko: , but isn't that the same video as the one on post #1?

LOL. You're right. I ended up quoting the same URL but I was actually referring to one of the linked videos. Sorry. My bad. :P

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Thank you for looking that up. That is very interesting. However I have never seen a commet with a tail like that.

No, because these aren't comets. They're bristol shubunkins. It's the "bristol" part, or the long, heart-shaped tail, that separates them from other single tails. There does appear to be one video, though, of a very traditional bristol tail, but on an albino, which is interesting... just wondering how they categorize this one.... :hummm

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:druel fabulous tails!!! :heart

thanks for sharing the link Hidr and thanks Lynda Von G for the info!! :hug

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