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100% Water Change


jody

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I keep my fish in a Rubbermaid with an air stone in some tank water during a full water change. Is it ok to just net them and put them back in the tank with temp matched conditioned water? Or do you have to acclimatize them first?

Thanks in advance

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Sorry I never do 100 percent water changes. At the most I do 80% and leave the fish in the tank.

I feel that 100% water changes are much to stressful on the fish. Just my opion. Someone that does that may come along with better advice. Mine is not to do it.

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From what i have read Hidr is correct. It is too stressful to do 100% water changes.

When i had to actually do it because of the ice storm, i made sure the temp was the same before i put my guys back in, but i wouldn't do it if i didn't have to.

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When I do my 100% water changes, I cheat a little bit -- I empty it to about 80%, and then I add another ten gallons, empty it to 80%, add another ten gallons, etc... that way, I figure I get basically everything, without actually having to take my goldies out of the tank and worrying about temp and stuff.

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You cast an ice storm upon your poor fish? :)

No, but when i took them to my in-laws, because we had no power, i used the water in the tank to try to make it less stressful for my little friends.

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It is not true, or at least not the point where it it NEEDED every month. Most successful goldfish keepers never do such water changes. It is also dangerous to do it if you are not already used to doing very large water changes. Any bacteria should not be an issue if the fish is not stressed. Fish get sick when they are stressed, which impedes their immune system. At that point whatever pathogens are present get a chance to cause infection. There are always pathogens present. Don't stress them and you won't have issues. Even with 100% water changes bacteria can travel from the water to the new water on the fish, nets, water on the fish, etc. Simply put, don't worry about that. Do an aggressive water change schedule that you and your fish can handle without stress.

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Taking your fish out if your aquarium. Then draining "all" the water out and refilling to do a 100% water change is totally unnessasary. I've never done that in over 30 years of fish keeping and never will. Unless you keep your goldfish in a bowl or have to drain and sterilize the tank after a disease outbreak (or have some freak thing happen) there is no reason for it.

If you want to do a 100% water change. Remove 50% of the water then refill. Drain another 50% and refill. Then you will have a 100% water change without having to remove the fish.

Sometimes I'll do a 50% water change 3 to 4 times a day in my fry tank. But never 100%.

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Agreed with above posters... besides, aside from the possibility that they are overcrowded and NEED the water change desperately, changing 25% every one to two weeks should suffice. I am wary with 100% changes because in addition to temp and ph and kh changes that may occur, you might be shocking the good bacteria with chlorinated tap water that you are adding back to the tank. Sure, you can add dechlorinator, but it doesn't act instantaneously and you will get some bacteria die off as a result.

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Agreed with above posters... besides, aside from the possibility that they are overcrowded and NEED the water change desperately, changing 25% every one to two weeks should suffice. I am wary with 100% changes because in addition to temp and ph and kh changes that may occur, you might be shocking the good bacteria with chlorinated tap water that you are adding back to the tank. Sure, you can add dechlorinator, but it doesn't act instantaneously and you will get some bacteria die off as a result.

I think if add dechorinator, fill in water and use pump for good aeration to the tank, it will removes chlorine faster.. what u think?

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There should be no ill effect from adding dechlorinator to the tank when the water starts going in.

25% every week or two is a pretty small water change schedule. The water change schedule should be based on the nitrate concentration. The nitrate concentration should be kept under 20ppm. For more information on this there is a whole article in my blog on stocking an aquarium (which includes the water change schedule).

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If you have to do the 100% water change then you have no choice, acclimating them could only make it easier. I agree it should be avoided but I'm confident your fish will be alright if they're already healthy.

My Comets don't like it, and my fancy were always listless for about 2 to 3 days. The famous American Ranchu Breeder---I forget his name---insists on changing 90% of his water once a week, he mentions it in the Fancy Goldfish book.

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100% water changes are not particularly stressing or scary, nor do they cause you to lose the cycle (beneficial bacteria that make up biological filtratration using the nitrogen cycle)..... if they are done RIGHT.

When you change any amount of water, it is always best to match the old water parameters as closely as possible..... temp, pH, gH, kH. If you match the parameters, there is no need to acclimate a fish back to the tank. It is rarely possible to match PERFECTLY, but for the majority of adult, healthy fish, there is no problem as long as you get close. (I am assuming you understand that "matching" does not mean matching nitrate values, etc. :rolleyes: )

It is very rarely necessary to change 100% of the water in a tank that is being filtered using the nitrogen cycle. If the tank is overstocked to the point that it needs very large water changes, then so be it. But it really is rarely rarely necessary to do 100%.

Green water requires all the water to be removed from a tub and the tub scrubbed and sterilized every few days to a week. But 10% of the water is reserved for "seed" for the green algae. This does not harm the fish in any way - or stress them.

In some tanks that have constant water exchange the water input/outlet is set so that the tank runs through the full volume of water or more per day. I use a run of 200% for heavily stocked fry tanks - when dealing with 1000s in 60 gallons, it is necessary to run at least 120 gallons (actually much more is necessary for complete 200% turnover) per day through the tank. This does not stress or harm or hurt the fish at all. It is a constant dilution, however.

100% water changes are very useful when changing fish around in various tanks, when using other methods of filtration, or when doing "tub to tub" - a time honored method of clearing disease and parasites. I do not hesitate to do 100% when it is needed... mostly when I am playing musical tanks with various fish. I will move a filter (cycle) with the fish from tank to tank, but the tanks are drained, sterilized and refilled 100% for the next occupant.

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I think one thing should be stressed here. If you get to a stocking level that requires 100% water changes, you need to get a second or larger tank, or get rid of a lot of your fish. I know some people get to that point unknowingly and then find this site, but it needs to change. It is not just an option to keep doing 100% water changes for the rest of their lives, you need to lower the density of fish.

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Thanks Daryl

When you change any amount of water, it is always best to match the old water parameters as closely as possible..... temp, pH, gH, kH. If you match the parameters, there is no need to acclimate a fish back to the tank. It is rarely possible to match PERFECTLY, but for the majority of adult, healthy fish, there is no problem as long as you get close. (I am assuming you understand that "matching" does not mean matching nitrate values, etc[end quote]

totally agree. I do not have to assimilate fish as I never assiilate to add them to a tank.

Instead I set up a QT tank and match that to put new fish in

when it comes to waterchanges, i never do 100% changes, but if you do and if you are taking out your own fish from your own tank then placing them back after the change then all the params should be the same(or as close to).

Edited by LuvMuhFred
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Fishguy is assuming that you are running a nitrogen cycle to control the water parameters - and then being forced to change the water to rid it of the nitrates (mainly). 100% water changes can be very useful - and a standard way of doing things when the water is NOT being maintained with a nitrogen cycle.

It is true, when using a nitrogen cycle to maintain water quality you will need to do periodic water changes to reduce the concentration of nitrate (and some other things) that result from the beneficial bacteria processing nitrogen (ammonia, nitrite). As your stocking increases, you will get more waste - and need to change more to reduce or remove the nitrates from the water. If you have a tank stocked so heavily (or FED so heavily- regardless of stocking) that the nitrate values are so high you are forced to either change LARGE volumes or do it more often, then you have a tank that requires intensive care. It is difficult to keep such a tank healthy - simply because it DOES require so much care. It is not impossible, though.

Most people do not have the time, energy or desire to maintain such a tank. It is necessary to change at least one parameter - that is usually reducing the waste makers in a volume of water. Larger water volume, greater volume at changes or more frequent changes can all solve the problem, too, but require time, dedication and WORK. They are not impossible - just........ slightly dangerous - for you cannot fail, cannot take a day off.

In CWE, there is no need for a nitrogen cycle. The ammonia is simply diluted and removed. In Zeolite filtered water, once again, all that is needed is a regular water change to remove growth hormones and such - the ammonia is bound and removed. In green water, the ammonia is processed by the algae - you only need to maintain the proper population of green algae (accomplished by water changes). All can be balanced to stocking and water volume - using frequency and volume of changes.

It is a balance. It has been found that the AVERAGE fishkeeper does not want to change more than 25-30% of the water, once a week. To do this, the average stocking is one fancy goldfish per 10 gallons, in tanks larger than 20 gallons. This is only the AvERAGE - not a clad in iron rule.

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Anyone reading this take note of Daryls post

Daryl from the day I joined this forum you have been a well of knowledge that has proven trustworthy and I love reading your posts. We can all learn from you!

You have the gift of been able to manifest the knowledge in words, some of us may think it, but none of us can explain so well :)

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When ever I used tap water to do a huge water change---over 50%, my fish were stressed. . . and that was including Stress Coat. However, since I've been keeping my guys in green water outdoors, I've started "seasoning" my "change" water by letting it cure in the sun for several days, even growing algae. When I do large water changes with this seasoned water, the fish don't appear to suffer.

However, since I've gotten my hands on a vaccum, I don't perform large water changes anymore, I just vacuum the mulm and refill the 50% that I siphoned.

This is precisely why bottom drains are so convenient!

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Not to belittle anyones input on this subject. I must agree Daryl is a good writer and does very well explaining things. (wish I could do that)

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I'd rather not do 100% w/c. I've done them before as I was changing the next (new substratre/airstone etc) and my lord the fish were frightenend and stressed, so much in fact that when put back into the main tank one of em developed fin rot :(

I prefer doing 25% w/c and if I need to do more (to clean the gravel and what not) I'd go 75% max.

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