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What Do I Need For Lighting?


johann_pond

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Well iv'e decided i want to and a substrate and plants to my tank. I already have 2-8" Amazon Swords, 2-4" Anubis I am going to be adding some Anacharis real soon. I also plan to one of these

187166458_tp.jpg. Anyone have suggestions on what i need for wattage?

Right now i have a 55gallon, it has 2 hood lamps 18"long. I know all the plants nee low to moderate lighting, but how do i figure out what watt bulbs will give me the light needed??

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Well iv'e decided i want to and a substrate and plants to my tank. I already have 2-8" Amazon Swords, 2-4" Anubis I am going to be adding some Anacharis real soon. I also plan to one of these

187166458_tp.jpg. Anyone have suggestions on what i need for wattage?

Right now i have a 55gallon, it has 2 hood lamps 18"long. I know all the plants nee low to moderate lighting, but how do i figure out what watt bulbs will give me the light needed??

You should have at least 110 watts for your tank (2 watts per gallon). If it is a power compact FL lamps, it comes in two version 55 watt and 65 watts model. So you can have two 55 watts or two 65 watts which is even better. I am a little bit confuse about your hood. I am not sure it is a power compact or regular shop light. Can you post the pic of it?

Additionally I would check for 6500K(planted light).

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For a low light, low tech, non CO2 tank you need about 1.5 watts or a little less per gallon.

My 55 gallon has 64 watts of light. (two 32 watt lights from nnnnnn. Nothing fancy or expensive) I think the most you can get with the lights in your picture is 40 and that is to low. Just add one 48 inch light fixture with a 30 or 32 what light and you well be fine.

Or you can get away with out more light if you can move your tank is in front a window that gives it indirect light. But this can be tricky. And I have never had any luck in front of any of my windows the light was just to bright from outside.

Good Luck

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For a low light, low tech, non CO2 tank you need about 1.5 watts or a little less per gallon.

My 55 gallon has 64 watts of light. (two 32 watt lights from nnnnnn. Nothing fancy or expensive) I think the most you can get with the lights in your picture is 40 and that is to low. Just add one 48 inch light fixture with a 30 or 32 what light and you well be fine.

Or you can get away with out more light if you can move your tank is in front a window that gives it indirect light. But this can be tricky. And I have never had any luck in front of any of my windows the light was just to bright from outside.

Good Luck

Hidr, thank you for the help, but what do you mean by (two 32 watt lights from nnnnnn) ?????

Right now inexpensive is what i need, money is very very tight.

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The forum uses nnnnnn instead of the store name. Lets just say your local department store. lol

I have two Daylights by GE. Both are 32 watt lights. For a total of 64 watts. I only leave the lights on for about 8 hours a day. Some days I don't turn them on at all usally about once or twice a week I do that. It helps keep the algae at a reasonable level so it does not get sightly.

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I have two Daylights by GE. Both are 32 watt lights. For a total of 64 watts. I only leave the lights on for about 8 hours a day. Some days I don't turn them on at all usally about once or twice a week I do that. It helps keep the algae at a reasonable level so it does not get sightly.

Ok, i get it about the nnnnn (DUH on my part)

Regrding the light, i picked up a shop light from work, it holds 2 48" flourecents. So your saying for the live plants i could get away with just using this ( it can hold 2 40 watt bulbs), or do i need to buy the ones like floura-grow, designed for aqua plants??

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That light should be good. I would use two 6500K bulbs from the hardware store. That is what I have on my 150.
Oh that should work just great. However you may want to replace one light for lower watts but try it out see how it does for you first.

Fishguy2727 & Hidr, thank you both for the help. I will plan on picking up 2 regular 32watt bulbs. Or, should i get the ones designed for aquarium plants??

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i would just get the bulbs rated 6500k so the plants are able to absorb them. i also have a 55g tank with two T5HO lamps @ 108 watts total. i got melon swords that are growing pretty fast. the amazons are a lil slower. but anyways, try out ur lighting and see how it is. you can choose to upgrade later on if you feel its inadequate. two watts per gallon with no CO2 injection works for me so far. i'm only using flourish excel for CO2 supplementation. my substrate is just river stones but that may change soon. good luck

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i would just get the bulbs rated 6500k so the plants are able to absorb them. i also have a 55g tank with two T5HO lamps @ 108 watts total. i got melon swords that are growing pretty fast. the amazons are a lil slower. but anyways, try out ur lighting and see how it is. you can choose to upgrade later on if you feel its inadequate. two watts per gallon with no CO2 injection works for me so far. i'm only using flourish excel for CO2 supplementation. my substrate is just river stones but that may change soon. good luck

Thanks for the heads up. I still don't understand what is the 6500k??? What dose it mean?

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that's just the light spectrum. plants like to be in that 6500k range to promote photosynthesis.

Jeff, thanks again. I had gone to nooppee since my last post. I checked out the bulbs and found a pair of daylight 48" 40watt with 6500k. I have set them up, and WOW is it bright.

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The Kelvin scale is a measure of temperature. It is celsius minus 273. The kelvin rating for light is based on this. The kelvin rating for light is what a black object would glow if heated to that kelvin temperature. Our sun burns at 6500 degrees kelvin. Photosynthesis with green pigment uses red and violet the most, mainly red. So for aquatic plants a light color of 6500K-9000K or so is ideal. The lower the kelvin rating, the redder the light. The higher the kelvin rating the bluer the light. I use 6500K mixed with actinic (so blue it is off the kelvin color scale). This provides an overall very white light that shows off all colors, blues as well as reds.

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The Kelvin scale is a measure of temperature. It is celsius minus 273. The kelvin rating for light is based on this. The kelvin rating for light is what a black object would glow if heated to that kelvin temperature. Our sun burns at 6500 degrees kelvin. Photosynthesis with green pigment uses red and violet the most, mainly red. So for aquatic plants a light color of 6500K-9000K or so is ideal. The lower the kelvin rating, the redder the light. The higher the kelvin rating the bluer the light. I use 6500K mixed with actinic (so blue it is off the kelvin color scale). This provides an overall very white light that shows off all colors, blues as well as reds.

Fishguy2727, Wow i feel like i'm back in science class.... ;) . I really do appreciate the help. Keep it comming.

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