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Need Some Creative Advice


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  • Regular Member

I finally got my 65 gallon tall (not 75 gal. as I was told by the seller :stupid: ) and I am having a problem. The hood was hand made out of wood and it doesn't have the usual plastic hood that normally comes with an aquarium. I will check with my local pet shops for a 65 gallon tall aquarium hood. The problem is that the water is splashing up onto the lighting wetting the light and a little bit of the wooden hood. Is there a cheap way to fix this without spending a lot of money on a hood? There is a plastic divider at the top of the middle of the tank and the measurements between that space is 17" x 11". So my guess is that I would need to get two hoods or two of something to cover over the gaps so that water doesn't soak the light and the wooden hood. Any creative suggestions are welcome! Thanks! I will try to post pics later of what I am talking about for those of whom I did not make any sense to. I kinda didn't make sense to myself! :rofl

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  • Regular Member

I agree with the other writer, get some plexiglass or cut glass made to your tanks specs. Then you do not have to worry about water hitting your lights. This is probably the most cost effective way to do it

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Plexiglass will work if it is well supported... but Plexiglass still "flows"..... and will, over time, sag. Even 1/4 -3/8 thick. If you can find it, Lexan is the product to use.

Barring that, most aquarium shops will sell bi-fold glass "leaves" that are made for tank covers. Ours has all the sizes - and some odd ones, too. This is special tempered glass that resists breaking. (I have, however, snapped the corner off one of my floor tanks at home.... I hit it with a stool by accident)

I have, in the past and in desperation, had glass cut for me at the window supply of the local hardware. I just have it cut to about 1/2 the width of the tank and set the light on it. Occasionally you can find a set up that will cut tempered glass for you, too.

Piano hinges - the type that hold the two leaves of commercially made glass tops together are sold at McMasterCarr. I have purchased lengths of those, and with the Lexan made unusual shaped tops - my corner 56 for one.

HAving the glass or plastic between the light and the water is essential. Protect your lighting.

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  • Regular Member

Lowes may have it. That long a span, though will sag. I would look for Lexan. Actually, a narrow single strip of glass along that length should do the trick. No hinges needed.

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I like Daryl's idea, one problem, Lexan is usually alot more expensive than plexiglass. I would call a few hardware stores, see who has 1/4" plexi, with the 1/4" thickness you should not get any sagging.

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I just got back from my local pet store and thank the Lord they had hinged glass tops!!!!! It was $40 total for both of the hinged glass lids but well worth it! Thank you all for giving me ideas just in case I couldn't find what I was looking for :heart:D

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I am the queen of cheap. If you go to a fabric store or craft store, they sell soft plastic sheeting that is made to protect tablecloths. They cut them by the yard, and are in 3'-4' width. They're heat resistant. (not heat-proof). Then get a staple gun and staple it under the light, so it's like a canopy. Of course it will sag, but not much. Staple one side completely, and hold it taught.

Maybe that may work?

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plexiglass is a wonderful thing. My tank is an 80 gallon given to me by a friend of the family when I was about 14. Since the tank is older than I am, it had the old metal hood with the light fixture and plastic hood. I didn't want the metal, it was old and rusty, so I bought 2 55 gallon hood, removed the light from plastic and we took two pieces of plexiglass and used a hand held heater for auto working and heated the plexiglass to form over where the metal lid was. My lights sit right on top. Its worked now perfectly for 30 years!

wow, now I feel old.

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