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Feeder Goldfish


maddy1997

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I am not getting any replies back but just to let you know I am not going to use it as a feeder I am using it for my pond fish. If I got 12 feeder fish it would be a $1.44 but if I got reg. gf then it would be about $60 if the feeder fish is just as healthy as the reg. gf then I don't want to have to pay an extra $59 bucks

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Yes Feeders are comets as well,however they tend to carry more disease because there are usually hundreds or even thousands in a tank at a time thereby increasing their exposure to things you dont want in your system ie bacterial infections, flukes, etc...... Good Luck !

Edited by Deahttub
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The $5 comets and commons and feeder fish that are 12 cents are the same fish. The $5 goldfish might be healthier because their not as crowded and kept under better conditions but that doesn't mean their disease/parasites. If your worried about health issues and have a limited amount of money. Buy the 12 cent feeder fish and quarantine them in an aquarium before putting them in your pond.

Several years ago I bought 100 feeder goldfish and put them in my pond. Now their all over 16 inches.

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Quarantine would be good in any case. True the feeder fish might carry more disease. Treating in a quarantine tank with praziquantrel and salt is recommended on this site for all new fish.

I have many lovely feeder fish in my pond, who were all quarantined first and I had no problems crop up this year.

Even if you put a few fish in, and there are males and females among them, you are likey to end up with more fish in the spring :) .

Good luck!

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Florence, my white comet, was a 25 cent feeder fish. Now she is over 6 inches long and just beautiful!

I also have several rosies that were "feeders". They are lively, active and healthy. You would need to quarantine any new fish and treat them for flukes and disease, so I say try the feeders and see how they do! :exactly

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I can't buy any new tank or don't have one on me for quarantine

use a rubbermaid tell your parents it's only going to be set up for a couple of weeks.

What is the size of pond or tank?

Edited by FishCrazy
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  • 3 months later...
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I feel after you own a fish for some time what it is worth in dollars and cents is minor. :D I think the feeder fish are not cared for as much because there is no fear of people returning them, it is the amount of fish that they can produce that is of the essence. If 60% of the batch is lost due to sickness it doesn't matter because they are raised quickly and cheaply. So I guess at that level it is all dollars and cents.

Why people feed these disease infested fish to their prized pets is beyond me. :idont Probably the same reason people feed their pets cheaply priced food :feedme

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I feel after you own a fish for some time what it is worth in dollars and cents is minor. :D I think the feeder fish are not cared for as much because there is no fear of people returning them, it is the amount of fish that they can produce that is of the essence. If 60% of the batch is lost due to sickness it doesn't matter because they are raised quickly and cheaply. So I guess at that level it is all dollars and cents.

Why people feed these disease infested fish to their prized pets is beyond me. :idont Probably the same reason people feed their pets cheaply priced food :feedme

Thanks, I will be getting baby goldfish not fedder fish :)

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Not all feeder fish are disease infested put some are. The baby non-feeder goldfish are also likely to have some disease their just not as stressed because they aren't crowded. Both should be quarantined.

Some people feed live goldfish because they like to watch their bigger fish chase them down. I've done it myself a few times when I was young. The big fish have a hard time catching them and it's just a mess. We are told or read that it's good to feed live fish so we do. Not knowing about all the problems that we can cause to our tanks and fish. I don't think that the people who feed live goldfish would do it if they knew that they could end up giving there big fish diseases.

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Yeah I am totally down with saving feeder fish. I think they all should be saved and released into their natural environment. But that is not realistic.

The general consensus around here is to QT the fish and then enjoy them as you would any other fish :D

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I think they all should be saved and released into their natural environment.

I know you didn't mean it this way (I REALLY hope). But....

DO NOT EVER RELEASE GOLDFISH INTO THE WILD.

They are invasive species. There are no natural predators for carp (of any kind, including common carp and goldfish) in the United States or Europe. Even in Asian countries there are not as many predators as where present when goldfish were first domesticated.

DO NOT buy feeder fish and release them into a lake or pond or river or whatever thinking you are doing the animal a favor. All those diseases that petstore fish inevitably come with will be introduced into the body of water. You could actually end up killing hundreds of fish. Goldfish are such invasive species in the Great Lakes area that the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago has an exhibit featuring goldfish caught in Illinois rivers. (Which was really interesting to see, but also made me realize the importance of keeping our Great Lakes free from foreign creatures.)

Edited by ryukin girl
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On that note WHAT DO YOU KNOW about their natural environment? You seem like an expert on their environment in the area of the US that you are in, but specifically what part of Asia are you an expert on? They have been domesticated yes but in some fashion or some time they existed in a natural ecosystem right? What do you think happened then? I am out of my league I know but I in no way glorified releasing goldfish into the wild in your city/town. RELAX!! :argue:

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O I know you didn't mean it that way. I said that before I started. I think we both need to relax.

I just wanted to make sure that no one reading this thread (including the 12 year old that started it) thought you were being serious. Children (and even some adults) are very impressionable. I just wanted to make sure that no one thought you were being serious. Take a chill pill. I will too.

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I have five "feeder fish" and two shubunkins. The feeders came from the PS death tank. I have to say out of all the fish I have bought, the feeders have been the healthiest. Could just be the supplier to my particular store. They were far healthier than the shubunkins that came from a better stocked tank.

I may be way off, but I dont think that the larger $5 comets came from any better beginnings than the feeders. I just think that the bigger comets came from the same stock and got sorted out/split off later. So the way I look at it, you could get a $5 fish that was raised in less than idea situations for a long time or a "feeder" that had been there for a fraction of the time.

Edited by NightAngel
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I am guessing really good. I know a few actually. My mother included. Who told me that when my fish get sick I should "set them free in the river and let nature take it's course" :rolleyes

Unfortunately just because we know better, doesn't mean everyone does. :)

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I just wanted to add that my two heartiest fish are my 15 and 23 cent feeders, respectivley.

And not to mention that a lot of the "feeder" fish in my local pet store tanks have the potential to be GOOOORGEOUS! Variences of the WHITEESt white and Brightest orange, orange with interesting black marks, etc.

Me personally, when I set up my pond this summer (fingers crossed!!! I have a LOT of yard projects set for this summer) I am going to stock it with some of the best color varied feeders I can pick out of the tank (after QT of course) because I know that with a pond so large it will be hard to control all the environments and specs, so I'm expecting some loss even despite my best of efforts. So in that respect I would rather lose a 15 cent investment rather than a 5 dollar investment.

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I'm always for saving feeder fish, I guess its better that you get already healthy ones but I cant help but feel sorry for the feeders EVERY...TIME...I...GO...TO...THE PET STORE! then I feel bad by the tiem I get to see the other healty fish.

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  • 1 month later...
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Also adding that i have four "feeder" fish, ranging from 10 to 14". They are the ones in my current signature, have been very healthy and have bred for me a few times. I wish I could put them in a pond, they are too big for their tank!

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  • 3 weeks later...
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Most GF feeders are common short fin comets.

If you have a good eye, sometimes you can pick out a few nice long finned (or at least will be when grown out) ones out of a store tank.

But, feeder tanks are usually overcrowded, so catching a select fish in a crowded tank is a PITA for store clerks.

But, every once in awhile, you can fit a jackpot.

A couple years ago, looking in a large feeder tank priced 25 cents each.

I spotted about 1/2 dozen nice colored koi (had barbels) in amongst the several 100 feeders in there.

I paid the clerk $5 extra to catch those little 3 inch koi.

I gave them to a buddy who had just built a small koi pond.

Today, they are about 24 to 28 inches & just great looking.

Now tame enough to beg food, when you approach the pond & eat out of your hand.

As always, with any new fish, use a Q tank & medicate if need be.

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