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Dorie And Nemo Fish What Is Needed?


angelchelle_26

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My daughter wants a nemo and and a dorie fish so hubby said ok we can start a saltwater tank. I have a 30 gallon that we want to use. Do we need live rock or the corals? I know we will need the nemo house (forgot what the are called) but are the live rock and corals really needed?

can you still use fake decor and fake plants?

What type of filter I have an extra Penguin 330 would that work or do I need speical saltwater filter? and what about the lights?

if we can bypass live rook and corals that would be really good because they are really costly right now but it we need it then we will get it but if we dont then we wont at the moment.

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I'm not a marine expert but did help my friend set up a tank a few years back. My impression was yes, you absolutely need to have the live rock.

I'd try searching some marine sites, nemos are clown fish and Dori was a blue tang I believe :)

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First of all, a "Dori" fish is called a Hippo or Regal Tang, and needs at least 75 gallons. A 30 gallon tank simply will not be big enough. It would be ok for the clownfish, but not the tang. You really really really need to research both Regal Tangs and clownfish and find out their needs. Getting into saltwater is not something to do impulsively just because your little girl wants it - you need to realize that it is going to be a huge amount of time and money. Yes, you most definitely need the live rock, and live sand too.

Also anemones (the "nemo house") are very sensitive creatures that are not for the beginning reefkeeper. Clownfish can host in a number of other corals, however. Keeping corals, you will need specific lights, as many of them are photosynthetic. Others need spot-feeding. You'll need to do research on what types of corals you want as well - as they are also living creatures, and some types can not be mixed, especially in a small tank.

I strongly urge you to do at least a few days worth of research before buying a single thing. Please check out www.nanoreef.com or www.reefcentral.com and sign up for the forums there. Both places are filled with very informative people who can help you through this process.

Good luck to you! I've done three months of saltwater research and I'm still not ready for the leap!

Edited by Chloeheartsfish
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For a beginer to marine fish its probably best to stick to a fish only tank to start with. Also you will need a protein skimmer, hydrometer among other things for marine fish. A marine tank has to be set up spot on as marine fish can easily become ill if conditions are not spot on. A marine tank also has to cycled and the salinity to be as near spot on as possible.

Unfortunately as clown fish have become very popular as a result of that film the wild clown fish is being harvested to point that in future they will become extinct so personally I always buy tank bred clown fish.

I would do as much research as possible before you even consider marine fish I am not trying to put you off but marines are not cheap to buy or keep.

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First of all, a "Dori" fish is called a Hippo or Regal Tang

Good to know :P

Great advice Chloe, I've never kept a marine tank myself but I do know what a huge amount of work they are, espeically when you're just starting. The friend I mentioned lost hundreds of dollars worth of fish before she got her tank established.

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I've had all types of tanks in my life from full reef tanks and now Goldies.....IMHO Godlies are WAY more difficult then reef tanks...That is if you have a properly equipped tank, from lighting, rocks, filtrations, etc......That being said, a 30 gallon reef tank would be as or more expensive to equip properly then a 55 gallon.....When it comes to reef tanks (as well as Goldies), the bigger the better...If you decide to set up a reef tank do yourself a favor and set it up properly and not half-fast. If you don't go all out,(i.e. going cheap instead of best) you will be giving yourself heartbreak and headaches.......

Now if you decide to do a fish only saltwater tank the costs are WAY cheaper....However you will have to cycle the tank which isn't too bad.....

Lastly, as for Nemo (Percular Clowns) I had a breeding pair of Perc's for 7 years.....They are very hardy fish, however you have to treat them soon as you get them for a bacterial infection. I have never gotten a percula clown that didn't have a bacterial infection. Once you get rid of the bacterial infection they should live for many years !

That's my .02.....Good luck with the tank and let us know how it goes !

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Unfortunately as clown fish have become very popular as a result of that film the wild clown fish is being harvested to point that in future they will become extinct so personally I always buy tank bred clown fish.

I would do as much research as possible before you even consider marine fish I am not trying to put you off but marines are not cheap to buy or keep.

Blue,

You are spot on with this assessment.....This is part of the reason that I don't have marine tanks anymore(I live in South Florida and could catch my own fish)....I was talking to Ken from Dandy Orandas and we had a conversation about this and how people are destroying our reefs to house people's personal collections....One thing Ken said thats still sticks with me is that our Goldies were bred to be pets....and that makes me feel more "green" if you will....

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  • 2 weeks later...
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I believe that setting up a marine tank might not be a good idea unless a lot of research has been done about it. My boyfriend and I, who both have several years of experience with having tanks, once talked about having one but after about a month's research we decided to drop the idea and possibly leave it for the future. Marine fish and 'decorations' are very delicate and, if you wish, fragile and require a lot of time, effort and money to be set up properly and for the creatures to remain healthy and live a long life.

The idea of having a marine tank is really sweet and fascinating, but unless you know what you're really getting yourself into, I'd personally advise that it's the best to wait with it or do lotslotslots of research.

Whatever you do, good luck. =)

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As far as destruction to the reefs, some of that is a myth. In fact a lot of marine aquarium keepers are dedicated to the preservation of reefs. Buying captive-raised animals only is one of the best ways to support that. ORA in particular is a great company that captive-raises marine animals. They come with a higher price which often puts people off but I feel that the price is worth it.

Also, when keeping corals, one of the best way to get new stock is to "frag"--break off small pieces of corals that grow to new colonies so we don't have to keep destroying reefs.

Thankfully the governments around the world have begun to step up about proper collection methods. In particular, they are providing training and teaching responsible collection techniques to third-world countries.

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  • 1 month later...
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First of all, a "Dori" fish is called a Hippo or Regal Tang, and needs at least 75 gallons. A 30 gallon tank simply will not be big enough. It would be ok for the clownfish, but not the tang. You really really really need to research both Regal Tangs and clownfish and find out their needs. Getting into saltwater is not something to do impulsively just because your little girl wants it - you need to realize that it is going to be a huge amount of time and money. Yes, you most definitely need the live rock, and live sand too.

i couldn't have put it better myself... and when you think to yourself, " i think dori would be fine in a 30 gallon tank", remember that this particular fish commonly reaches 12" long, and putting a fish that size in a tank that small would be equivalent to me locking you up in a closet and expecting you to be fine. if you really want to keep a larger fish, make sure that you can provide not only a place for it to live, but thrive.

research, research, research.

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