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Highest Temps You Have Kept Goldfish In?


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It's all depend where is your original goldfish come from. Like me, i have goldfish from Thailand. They love warm water 75-85F.

Especially, Black ranchu.

Edited by Ranchu69
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Oh yes...they're do. I understand that goldfish are cold water type fish. But you must understand that goldfish will adapt to climate where they being breed and raise. if you have get fish from country where their climate is high/hot. Once you have receive them and you put them in cold water saying 60-68F, they'll die. Im not talking about sudden temperature change. Even you give time to let's them adjust temperature from your bag to your tank.

In the long run, you might consider to turn on your heat. I used to get fish from paul. Last time, he imported fishes, probably last year. All his fish were from thailand, I got a black ranchu and one R/W ranchu. He told me to turn on a heat coz his fish from thailand and all his fish need to be keep in 72-80F for sometime. And i just slowly lower my tank's temp later.

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The highest is 90*F without a heater. My house is not that warm but with the lights on the tank is a few degrees different.

ETA: It is interesting to know about the sudden temp change even after letting them float in the bag in the water. I never knew that would be a problem.

Edited by goldfish7
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What I meant was that even if bred in and used to lower temps, they can still thrive in temps that are 'too warm'. They aren't really coldwater fish, but wide temperature range fish. They can thrive in tropical and cool water. Many people just say 'they are coldwater, they have to be below X, they can't be in with tropical fish because their temps don't match.'

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I have a couple in my 75 discus tank right now. They help keep the duckweed and crystalwort under control. It is entertaining seeing the two species together. The tank is about 86F and I see no negative effects from them being in the 75 instead of the 150 goldfish tank.

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We do an experiment in the animal physiology lab I work in on goldfish acclimation. They are housed long term in either 10 degree or 20 degree water (Celcius). Then the students put a 10 degree fish and a 20 degree fish in a 10 degree tank and a 20 degree tank....confused yet? Anyway, they measure respiration. The fish in the temperature it's used to always breathes normally, they've physiologically adjusted to the temp they were kept in, where as the other fish show atypical respiration rates.

This doesn't answer your question fishguy, 20 degrees isn't that warm, but it does show that in the long term goldies can adjust to a range of temperatures.

Edited by Chrissy_Bee
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How long before their respiration returns to normal?

Any other signs of stress?

So one from each goes in each? (one 10 and one 20 in a 10C tank, and one 10 and one 20 in a 20C tank?)

Well the respiration doesn't return to normal within the 3 hour lab peroid. I don't have the details right now but I'll check it out. There are no other obvious signs of stress, but they are in opaque containers so it's hard to see them well. We use an oxygen probe to measure the respiration.

And yes, one from each goes in each, and the non-acclimated fish always show a difference in oxygen consumption.

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My tanks have gotten up to around 82-83... maybe 84 in the hottest part of summer. My fish in the main, 55-60 gallon tank never seem affected, but when my 10 gallon qt got up to 82, I had a lot of top breathing, so that smaller volume of water really did make a difference with the heat. My white ranchu does seem to tend to like a bit warmer waters; she doesn't seem to be as flexible with water temp variances as my ghetto kids.

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Yes, higher temps increase metabolism, which means they need more oxygen. If this makes them gasp at the surface that means the tank was probably right on the border of needing more aeration before the temp increase. Does that 10gallon quarantine tank have an air stone on it?

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One thing to remember: even though goldfish can does adapt to the temperature, having them in a higher temperature range will cause them to have a shorter live span. Higher temp-->faster metabolism-->organs work harder-->wears out faster-->organs fail quicker-->shorter lifespan

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Yes and no. Hibernation slows down everything and can make them live longer, but is length of life the only way to determine what is ideal? I do not think it is really that organs work harder, wear out, and then fail. And it is not like we are talking about 10 years versus 40 years, we are talking about very subtle differences in lifespan, over the whole life of a goldfish TONS of things effect exactly how long it will end up being, including genetics. So a higher temp, which some evidence shows is actually better by multiple other ways of determining ideal and ability to thrive, is not shown to have a negative effect on the fish's health. If any subtle differences in lifespan were shown to be directly caused by temp, it doesn't mean that a higher temp is bad since a longer life does not equate to a better life.

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I never say having shorter lifespan is bad or equates to having a bad life :) . Just stating a fact there. Also never said that longer life meaning an ideal life :rolleyes: . Don't get too defensive like that lah.

Having your fish in warmer water is totally your choice. Hobbyists in South Asian countries have no choice in that matter and like it or not their fish are active year-round due to the tropical climate.

For me personally, whenever possible, it's best if the goldfish experience the differences of changing seasons and follow the natural fluctuations. Having them in lower temperature during winter (but never hibernation) is a way to give their bodies a bit of a rest before the following natural increase in activity during spring & summer. It also helps them build up immunity to diseases.

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Not defensive, just clarifying.

My main point here is to really look at the temperatures people keep thriving goldfish in and see if it makes sense to always cite temp as an issue, especially when determining their compatibility with other species. Usually when people ask if fish X can go with goldfish people rush in and say "NO!, goldfish are coldwater and those are tropical, they can't mix." When it seems like actually goldfish thrive in the exact same temps as tropical fish.

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78-79 degrees is as hot at it has gotten, but that's in hot weather. It stays at 74 now that it's cold outside.

Edited by whitner
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