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An Empty 35 Gallon...


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Hello everyone!!

I'm new here on the forums. I have long been a lover of goldfish, and kept several off and on when I was younger, with very little success. The longest one would last was maybe a year. I was a diligent pet owner and did everything the LFS told me to do (this was in the days before forums like this, where one could get a second opinion!). They even told me that one year was the natural lifespan of a goldfish! So I never knew that I was doing all the wrong things. In fact, I thought I was doing pretty well. So young and foolish!

Well, happily, I'm older and wiser now, and I look forward to actually educating myself about the needs of goldfish. Especially since I now work at a pet store and don't want to become the same kind of person who led me astray with false information as a youngster!

I'm setting up a 35-gallon tank for goldfish again, but now that I'm armed with more knowledge, I'm going to do it the RIGHT way. I know that the inch-of-fish-per-gallon rule doesn't really apply to goldfish because they are so heavy-bodied, produce so much waste and require so much oxygen. Also, I would like to see the fish reach a good large size, so I don't want to overcrowd. Would I be able to put two fancy goldies in the tank, or would that not be enough room for them? I have been doing some research on different types, and I think I would like Ranchus. They remind me of puppy dogs for some reason!

The tank is 3 feet long, by about 1.5 feet high, and a little over 1 foot wide. With proper filtration and aeration, would this size of a tank be large enough to accomodate two Ranchus and a snail or two?

Thanks very much, I look forward to learning more on these forums!! Everyone seems to be truly devoted goldfish owners.

C

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:welcome

glad to have another goldfish lover join the Koko crew! :D

2 ranchus for your 35 gallon is just about perfect if you want them to grow big, fat and happily! :)

maximum your tank could hold is 3, but i think 2 is just riiight!

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Two is perfect. It means you wont have to upgrade when they reach full size. And a couple snails would be just fine with them.

Good luck cant wait too see the fish your get.

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Thanks for the warm welcomes!! I love how everyone here is so friendly and clearly loves their fish. It's amazing to me how goldfish are still the martyrs of the pet world when they are such unique and delicate fish that can grow so large and live so long. It really frustrates me when I get customers that come in to the pet store where I work and ask how many goldfish they can put in a bowl. When I try to explain to them why bowls are unacceptable (not enough surface area for gas exchange, the need for frequent water changes due to the high waste output, and the fact that in many cases the fish might grow to be the SIZE of the bowl) they simply don't care. They will continue to keep it in the bowl until it dies however many months later, and then get a new one. I constantly walk a delicate balance between trying to honestly educate a customer and freaking out and ordering them out of the store. If I was the manager, I probably would refuse the sale, but I'm a meaningless part timer, so I have no power there. It makes me sad :(

I'm glad to hear that my plans for the tank are a good choice for healthy fish! I am also hoping to have some natural plants in the tank - something that will grow fast and replenish itself when the fish nibble on it. I'm thinking maybe Java moss, or water sprite. Also, in regards to substrate, my regional manager said at a meeting the other day that lots of fish retailers and owners are switching to a sand subtrate "because it's better". I agree that it looks very nice, but by "better" I'm not sure if he means better for the fish, or better for business, which can often be the total opposite of good for the fish. Also I know that sand is great for marine fish and cichlids, but I've never heard of it used for goldfish. What does everyone here think??

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I have never used sand. Because it can ruin a filter and it can cause damage to goldfish gills. They are diggers and would really keep the sand stirred up and I can't see that ever being good.

Maybe someone that has used it can help you out better.

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Thanks Hidr!

Yeah, I could see how sand and goldfish might not mix very well. Maybe the reason he thought it was "better" is because the fish waste sits on top and is easier to siphon up? But given the way goldies root around I think you are right about the sand being more of a pain than anything else.

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:welcome

Hello and welcome! I think you will really like it here. The folks are really friendly and very experienced in just about anything that comes up with these guys. And you won't find better moral support or understanding anywhere else either. Looking forward to pics once you get things set up! And good job on at least trying to educate people at your job.

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haha you'll find that sand is one of those highly debated issues here at koko's.

most of us keep bare bottom tanks, some with gravel, some with river rocks, and some with sand.

again... sand debates use to get fairly heated, but now it's mostly people will give you personal experience and tips...

but ultimately it's up to you. :)

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Hi Tinkokeshi! I really do like the look of sand, but I definitely won't use it if it may harm the fish. I'll do some more research. I definitely welcome other people's experiences! Since I want to add a few plants, I don't think barebottom would work, would it??

I'm super impatient to get the tank up and cycling, but my friend's boyfriend is making a stand for me, so I need to wait until that is done. I found an online tank weight calculator and found out that when the 35 gallon is full of water and substrate, it will weigh over 400 pounds! So then I got paranoid about a ready-made stands not being able to hold the weight. It's a used tank though so it needs some TLC in the meantime and that'll keep me busy :) I will for sure post some pics of the process. Looks like I need to get me a photobucket account!

Kathy B: Thank you, myself and my three co-workers (we're all university students) are all crazy pet-lovers and we are all doing everything we can to educate ourselves! We've joined all kinds of forums and made contacts with reputable breeders and experts in various areas - not just fish, but birds and exotic pets as well. We hope that we can make some small difference in the way the shop is run by atleast taking the initiative to learn and educate customers properly, even though the company makes no effort to encourage us to do so. I personally cannot look someone in the face and start making up random stuff about the care of an animal that is for sale. I will honestly say "I don't know. But I'm going to find out where you can go to get the answers you are looking for". The shop does a few things that are good for business but in our opinion not so great for the animals, so we're hoping to influence some changes. If our good intentions lead to nothing, maybe we'll just open up our own pet shop after graduation. I'm no business mogul myself, but I think we could all use a few more high-quality pet shops out there.

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The most recent sand-discussion thread can be found here (in the 'tanks & equipment' forum): http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/...showtopic=73377

You can do bare-bottom with plants, and lots of us do it: find some nice glass bowls or similar objects to put the plants in. Potted plants can work very well with goldfish, but goldfish like to dig up plants to eat the roots, so putting larger rocks around the top is a good idea. For ideas you can browse the 'planted tank' section.

I recently built my own stand, and just put the tank (50 gallons!) on it yesterday. I'm VERY scared that it will break somehow, though it seems stronger than those particle-board stands. It's my first carpentry project, I'm working with minimal tools in an apartment, and I could have done a much better job... but it's held up for about 18 hours so far.

Edited by A Penguin
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Thanks A Penguin! I went over and read the discussion. I also talked with a few experienced fishkeepers at work and on a local forum, and I think I will bypass the sand and use aquarium river rocks instead. And I am definitely going to peruse the planted tank section for inspiration :)

I hope your self-made tank stand works well for you! You are lucky that you are handy with the tools. It is killing me to not call my friend's guy every twenty minutes and ask if the stand is ready yet, lol. I want my tank up and cycling!! It's a lesson in patience to be sure :)

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