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Woke Up To Cloudy Water


Guest kevharris

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Guest kevharris

I am going assume that the reason I woke up this morning to find my new aquarium all cloudy is because the tank has begun its cycle? If not, well, tell me what I need to do. I took some water readings, here's what the values were:

pH: 7.6

Ammonia: 0

Nitrates: 5.0

Nitrites: 0

Thanks,

Kevin

BEFORE

IMG_8441.JPG

NOW

IMG_8481.JPG

Edited by kevharris
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that's looks like the same problem i was having but mine was even more cloudy (couldn't see the fish). i blame my problem on my water conditioner (ammo lock 2), since i switched to detox-plus i have no more cloudy water! what water conditioner do you use?

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It looks like an alage bloom. New tanks go though this. As long as the water test looks good leave it alone and it will work itself out. I kill 3 large beautiful fish trying to clear up a cloudy tank that had just cycled. I later learned that I should have just let it be and it would have cleared up on its own. I was told that it can take several weeks to clear up on it own.

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YOu say the tank is beginning a cycle, yet there is no ammonia or nitrite.... only nitrate. This means that that nitrate is coming from your tap or source water.... something to keep in mind.

If the tank were beginning cycle, you would be seeing ammonia - of some value. If there were a bacterial bloom, you would be seeing readings of nitrite and most likely some ammonia, too. Having zero on both readings means this is NOT a bacterial bloom.

I would check the tests again, check the filter to make sure you have full flow (you should have AT LEAST 10 times turnover an hour - I prefer more), and review what additives you have used in the tank. Have you used a chlorine detox? Have you used an ammonia binder? Have you used carbon in the filter - or just added more? When was the last time you changed the water out - and how much did you change?

:)

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Guest kevharris

The tank and filter are both new. They just got setup about 3 days ago...so I am assuming this is a normal part of the tank cycle. The filter is running fine, it's a 110 gph filter, brand spanking new. I am going to just keep an eye on it for now and see how things go. I'll keep testing the water and wait this out. I don't think it's something to be concerned about right now...at this point in the tank's life.

When I first setup the tank I added a half-cap full of Tetra AquaSafe to the water to take care of the chlorine, cloramine, heavy metals, etc. The tank ran clear as a bell for 2 days and now this happened, and something is telling me it's a normal part of the tank being new and all.

Kevin

YOu say the tank is beginning a cycle, yet there is no ammonia or nitrite.... only nitrate. This means that that nitrate is coming from your tap or source water.... something to keep in mind.

If the tank were beginning cycle, you would be seeing ammonia - of some value. If there were a bacterial bloom, you would be seeing readings of nitrite and most likely some ammonia, too. Having zero on both readings means this is NOT a bacterial bloom.

I would check the tests again, check the filter to make sure you have full flow (you should have AT LEAST 10 times turnover an hour - I prefer more), and review what additives you have used in the tank. Have you used a chlorine detox? Have you used an ammonia binder? Have you used carbon in the filter - or just added more? When was the last time you changed the water out - and how much did you change?

:)

Edited by kevharris
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Every tank I have ever set up has done this same thing for about two weeks to a month. It's normal. Just make sure you are testing everyday and doing water changes when needed. Don't try to add anything to clear it up, it's unnecessary and could hurt Ludwig.

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Hey Kev, Did you transfer your filter media and everything straight over from your old tank? Could you have maybe gotten your nitrites and nitrates readings mixed up? Cuz, if you transferred your media from your smaller tank, for the time it was running, it might explain already having nitrites, but whether you used your old media or not, it's pretty much impossible to have nitrates so soon. I think you're right that this is just part of the cycle, but I, too, would like to see you double check your readings. It's easy to confuse nitrites and nitrates. After all, it's just one little letter! And, it's going to be a much better explanation of the cloudy water than if you did have nitrates, cuz if you do have nitrates and cloudy water, there's other problems that could be much worse....

The tank and filter are both new. They just got setup about 3 days ago...so I am assuming this is a normal part of the tank cycle. The filter is running fine, it's a 110 gph filter, brand spanking new. I am going to just keep an eye on it for now and see how things go. I'll keep testing the water and wait this out. I don't think it's something to be concerned about right now...at this point in the tank's life.

When I first setup the tank I added a half-cap full of Tetra AquaSafe to the water to take care of the chlorine, cloramine, heavy metals, etc. The tank ran clear as a bell for 2 days and now this happened, and something is telling me it's a normal part of the tank being new and all.

Kevin

YOu say the tank is beginning a cycle, yet there is no ammonia or nitrite.... only nitrate. This means that that nitrate is coming from your tap or source water.... something to keep in mind.

If the tank were beginning cycle, you would be seeing ammonia - of some value. If there were a bacterial bloom, you would be seeing readings of nitrite and most likely some ammonia, too. Having zero on both readings means this is NOT a bacterial bloom.

I would check the tests again, check the filter to make sure you have full flow (you should have AT LEAST 10 times turnover an hour - I prefer more), and review what additives you have used in the tank. Have you used a chlorine detox? Have you used an ammonia binder? Have you used carbon in the filter - or just added more? When was the last time you changed the water out - and how much did you change?

:)

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Guest kevharris

Took new tests this afternoon...here's the results...

pH: 7.6

HRpH: 7.8

Ammonia: 0.25

Nitrites: 0

NitrAtes: 5.0

I checked the filter and it appears to be working perfectly fine. The water is still cloudy, but very slightly less cloudy than yesterday. Comments? Suggestions? Advice?

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Guest kevharris

Can't be. I only feed him once a day. I have been pretty disciplined about his feedings.

Oh and to answer the earlier question, no I did not transfer ANYTHING from the old tank. I decided not to out of concerns of tainting this tank. So in essence this is a FRESH tank, fresh filter, everything. Probably stupid of me, but I was paranoid about introducing bad things from the old tank.

overfeeding?
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Have you added any supplements? Such as cycle?

It makes absolutely NO sense to have Nitrates so soon if you are starting up from scratch.

hmm...

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There is an ammonia reading in the latest set of tests, which agrees with this being a fresh/new setup, so it is likely that the nitrate was already present in the water. Have you tested the tap water for comparison?

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Guest kevharris

Well that explains it. I tested my tap water and it has a reading between 5.0 and 10 for Nitrates...that is the color is kind of between 5.0 and 10 on the card that came with my test kit. Hmmm...is that normal??

I also did a second test of the aquarium water:

HRpH: 7.7

Ammonia: 0.25

Nitrites: 0

NitrAtes: 5.0

Pretty much the same reading as earlier today. I dunno but my gut is telling me to wait this out and just keep testing the water everyday.

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Good thinking Penguin. As far as "normal," people have all sorts of readings come out of their tap. Ammonia is what is usually in there, but nitrates are a much better option than ammonia, so that's good. When the tank finally cycles, you may have a higher nitrate reading for your "normal," so that will have to factor into things and you may have to work a bit harder to keep it in the range it should be at, that is, around 20, but really, regular water changes of at least 50% can keep it around 10 and you may have to do around 70% changes, but that shouldn't be hard to do at all. And, whereas the nitrates are explained now, your readings are right where they should be for a new tank. The cloudiness is just part of the cycling process; the bacteria is building. Cloudy water in a new aquarium is usually due to a condition known as bacterial bloom. It just means that you have bacteria feeding upon the fish waste (and sometimes when too much food is left uneaten) and beginning to grow in large numbers, resulting in cloudy water. There are several types of bacteria that are necessary to neutralize wastes produced in your aquarium. Keeping your aquarium very clean by removing debris such as decaying plants and uneaten food, vacuuming the gravel regularly and performing partial water changes will quickly resolve most cases of bacterial bloom. And, of course, testing to keep your ammonia level as low as possible. No, it's not pretty stupid of you to not use the old filter media. You never know when you might have something bad in there and it's always better to be safe than sorry.

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Guest kevharris

Well I have some good news and some "me being stupid" news. First the good news...the tank is looking noticeably better this morning. Why this improvement so quickly you ask?

Well it helps if you read instructions! LOL!!

I was looking at the instructions for the filter system and I happened to notice this little tiny fine print line at the bottom of step 1 which reads "Strainer should be no closer than 2" to bottom gravel" I looked at the tank and at where the strainer was...it was like a half an inch from the bottom. I took out the extension tube and attached the strainer to the filter and it is now about 3" from the bottom.

I woke up this morning and the tank is looking better. I will test the water later on after my class. And you know, I am not pinning this 100% on the filter strainer's position. This is, as you have suggested and as I have surmised, a part of the tank cycle. So while it was very necessary to move the filter strainer upward, I cannot say that is entirely the reason for the tank going cloudy. The tank has to go through its cycle...so that's what it's doing.

Feeling very noob-ishly stupid,

Kevin

PS. Here are photos showing the difference...

2 DAYS AGO

IMG_8481.JPG

TODAY - notice the filter's strainer is higher now

IMG_8483.JPG

Edited by kevharris
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Guest kevharris

Okay, took some new tests. Ammonia has risen since last nights test, pH is up a bit, but Nitrites and NitrAtes remain unchanged.

HRpH: 7.8

Ammonia: 1.0

Nitrite: 0

NitrAte: 5.0

Should I do anything about the ammonia?

Edited by kevharris
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When you are cycling with fish, you need to do frequent water changes; even everyday if that's what your readings require. How often are you doing water changes and how much?

Your water changes are based on your readings, that is, for instance like now, you need to do a water change to bring down your ammonia reading. For goldfish, water changes should really never be less than 50%. Another thing to know is that, for whatever amount of water you remove, you are removing an equal amount of ammonia. So, if you did a 50% water change, you'd reduce your ammonia to 0.5. While this isn't bad, I, myself, like to keep it lower, so if you did about a 75% water change, you'd be down to 0.25, which I like better. Test before and after so you know where you're at.

Do you have a vacuum? You need to also vacuum your gravel really well at each water change. Did you rinse your gravel really well before adding it to the tank? If your filter tube was too close to the bottom and you feel that might be the reason for the cloudiness, then it may be gravel dust. If you rinsed the gravel, then the cloudiness may have been from the filter sucking up uneaten food. Just some thoughts. Either way, if these could be the problem, vacuuming the gravel will eventually get rid of the gravel dust and/or food.

btw, at 7.8, you ph is fine, especially as long as it's stable. That's the most important thing. Goldfish can handle higher ph levels rather well. It's the lower ph; substantially below 7.0, that can be a problem.

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Guest kevharris

Okay, I did a 75% water change. Then tested immediately following the change...

HRpH: 7.6

Ammonia: 0.50

Nitrite: 0

NitrAte: 5.0

We already found out that the tap water has Nitrates of 5.0 in it...so, that explains that. Even after a change of 75%, the ammonia levels are still high. Suggestions?

Edit: Oh and I forgot, yes I have a vacuum...when I changed the water I vacuumed up a bunch of...well...crap from the bottom. Hopefully that will help things.

When you are cycling with fish, you need to do frequent water changes; even everyday if that's what your readings require. How often are you doing water changes and how much?

Your water changes are based on your readings, that is, for instance like now, you need to do a water change to bring down your ammonia reading. For goldfish, water changes should really never be less than 50%. Another thing to know is that, for whatever amount of water you remove, you are removing an equal amount of ammonia. So, if you did a 50% water change, you'd reduce your ammonia to 0.5. While this isn't bad, I, myself, like to keep it lower, so if you did about a 75% water change, you'd be down to 0.25, which I like better. Test before and after so you know where you're at.

Do you have a vacuum? You need to also vacuum your gravel really well at each water change. Did you rinse your gravel really well before adding it to the tank? If your filter tube was too close to the bottom and you feel that might be the reason for the cloudiness, then it may be gravel dust. If you rinsed the gravel, then the cloudiness may have been from the filter sucking up uneaten food. Just some thoughts. Either way, if these could be the problem, vacuuming the gravel will eventually get rid of the gravel dust and/or food.

btw, at 7.8, you ph is fine, especially as long as it's stable. That's the most important thing. Goldfish can handle higher ph levels rather well. It's the lower ph; substantially below 7.0, that can be a problem.

Edited by kevharris
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0.5 is fine. I just like being extra careful and keeping my readings as low as possible. Sometimes the math isn't as clearcut as it sounds or should be, so you may not always remove 75% of the ammonia with a 75% water change. And yes, vacuuming up all that crap is going to help a lot! But, 0.5 is fine. Just try to keep it around there as best as you can. How's the clarity doing?

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Oh! Something else I was looking at in your pictures. You might want to move the log away from the filter tube and over to the side. Goldies need a little hidey place where they can rest away from the higher flow of water from time to time. Another option that many on here like to do is to put in a glass or vase that the fish can hide in. They seem to LOVE that and you can still see them. Another thing you can do too, if your fish is having a difficult time finding food in the rocks is to put a bowl in there and make sure the food falls into that bowl. It makes it easier for the fish to find the food and easier for you to clean it out too!

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Guest kevharris

Water is looking great, relatively clear. I will move the log over a bit and look into a hiding place for him. The bowl idea is EXCELLENT...nothing like trying get uneaten peas out of the gravel.

Thanks a lot!

Kevin

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Guest kevharris

Water is looking great this morning, although a test of ammonia showed it had risen back up to 1.0. Did a 50% water change and its back down to 0.25.

I thought I read somewhere, like in the cycle of the tank thing, that ammonia is supposed to rise during the early part of the tank's cycle. Is this not right? If that is so, is 1.0 too high for the early part of a cycle? Also, should I add an ammonia neutralizer at this point?

Thanks,

Kevin

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The graph at the top of this page is a link to the "Cycle" page. You should keep the ammonia below 2.0 ppm. The ammonia neutralizer is a good idea as it makes this process a lot safer. What product would you use?

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Guest kevharris
The graph at the top of this page is a link to the "Cycle" page. You should keep the ammonia below 2.0 ppm. The ammonia neutralizer is a good idea as it makes this process a lot safer. What product would you use?

I am kind of partial to Tetra's products. So I have a bottle of Ammonia Detox. That is what I would use. And from what I have read, the ammonia detox stuff doesn't remove the ammonia, it merely binds with the ammonia to make it non-toxic to the fish while also providing a stress relief barrier to help fish cope with any damage they may have received from high ammonia levels.

So this will keep my fish from dying I guess, but in the long run...I have ammonia issues. Like I posted in another thread...my tap water has ammonia in it.

Kevin

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