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Ph/kh/gh Test Results


Guest Fish Girl

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Guest Fish Girl

Hi!

I had a pH crash and I'm just recovering now and quite nicely I believe. However, I would love some help from the experts! :exactly

I just bought a new test kit today (API) as my last one was from 2003! :krazy: I didn't realize they could go bad, but I guess so!

Anywho...My results are:

Ammonia 0

Nitrites 0

Nitrates 40

pH 7.6-7.8 roughly

KH 8 drops

GH 27 drops

I am not overly familiar with the KH/GH tests. The GH seems high and the KH low? or OK?

I have a 72 gallon bowfront tank (running for over 3 years) with only 1 medium sized ryunkin in it, I lost my 3 others over the past few weeks. My choc oranda yesterday being the most recent.

How does this look to you? Am I in need of any drastic measures? Is the GH ok? Will this adjust with water changes? I have to admit I've been lacking in that department, but will fix that as soon as I understand my water conditions as I have to deal with emergencies 1st!

Thanks for your thoughts!

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  • Regular Member

The gH seems okay: I think it translates to 270 ppm, and over 300 or 350 can be bad...? Somebody else will have to help you with that.

Your kH is at a good level, and your pH is great for goldfish. It is best to keep nitrates below 40: lower is better (time for a water change).

The minerals that make up the hardness (both KH and GH) are from the tap water. KH is gradually used up over time, and stabilizes the pH, so periodic testing (at least once a week) will tell you if it is sufficiently high to keep pH stable. KH is replenished by waterchanges, but is limited by the KH of your tap water. GH measures the amount of calcium and magnesium cations in the water, and tells you how much overall mineral content the water has.

The best thing to do when you have a suspected water quality problem is to do a large water change.

(edited for quality control)

Edited by A Penguin
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It just occured to me after reading about your emergency that it would be useful to know the parameters of your tap water, so we can know how how the tap water is affecting your tank, especially because you are using a buffer.

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Guest Fish Girl

I'm testing them now, the pH is testing out at 6.6 although last night it was so low that we couldn't get a reading on the test. This is the cause of the emergency, my hubby took the nutralizer off of the house and didn't think about the tank. pH in the house bottomed out.

The KH is 10 straight from the tap. GH is 33 drops :o

Edited by Fish Girl
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That's a great kH reading. I don't know much about gH so no comment there.

I do have a silly question....what's a neutralizer? I'm assuming it's something to keep your pH around neutral, but I've never heard of it.

Edited by Chrissy_Bee
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Guest Fish Girl

Yeah, that's exactly what it is. We don't have city water here and are connected to our own personal well. We need something connected to the house water to bring up the pH. That is why we had so much trouble where we never have before, no neutralizer = pH crash. :rolleyes:

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Guest Fish Girl

Everything has been reconnected and the pH in the house is coming back up. It is not there entirely, but we're working on it. Hopefully based on my tap readings (once the pH is fixed) we should be ok without a buffer all the time.

I am not an expert but I think you are right Chrissy, the ground has a lot to do with the well water quality...

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I've heard about how the various regions of the US tend to have different mineral contents in their water supplies due to regional differences in geography, I just never considered that this could mean pH differences as well.

I hope your water trouble ends soon! It's sad hearing about fish losses.

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Hi! How's your ph doing? Has it stabilized? While the disconnnection of the neutralizer was more than likely the issue, high nitrates can also cause a ph crash and I think nitrates are supposed to be kept below 20. Well, maybe 40 is some kind of danger zone dividing line, but I still, personally, find anything above 20 very scary. I like to keep my nitrates around 10 if at all possible. So, you also may want to to do a little nitrate modifications too.

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Guest Fish Girl

It has been stable since I added the buffer. We did a water change and I needed to add some more buffer to bring it back up but at least we are aware of the issue and how to keep it controlled.

The nitrate issue was a factor of not doing enough water changes. We have changed our routine and should have less concern now. My last little buddy is doing great! I think he might be a big lonely though :(

I am still going to wait some time before adding any new fish. I want to make sure that everything in the tank is ok.

Thanks for your input!

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