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A Couple Of Serious Questions


PetroBoy

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Hello everyone!

I have some questions about my beloved oranda, the first of which being what I should do about his wen growth. His wen has gotten REALLY big, to the point where not only have his eyes been covered up but I begining to worry about his mouth being smothered as well. What should I do? I'm not comfortable with surgery but am unaware of other options. My other question is what do I need to do to get him/her swimming and breathing better? He/She spends a lot of time on the bottom but also seems to breath rather heavily. I'm a little rushed with this post so any further details you guys need to help me out I'll be happy to supply the answers.

Thanks in advance :)

-PB

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Hi there

Would you be able to tell us about your tank a little? How big is it, how many fish in there, and most importantly, the water perameters. It could be that your fish's wen is litereally weighing him down, but bottom sitting and heavy breathing can be signs of other problems.

As for the large wen, many of us (me included) have had fish with large wens and not trimmed them. However, if you really feel that it's going to hinder his eating, etc, the only real option is trimming. I wouldn't recommend doing this though if it's something you're not comfortable with.

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Without getting into water quality just yet I can give you guys a few more details.

This is the only fish in a 30gal. tank. He/she is more-or-less 7 years old. In terms of size this fella is maybe about 8" long including fins.

I don't think that the wen is weighing him down, because (and I know this isn't good) sitting at the bottom of the tank has been pretty common for the past year or two. I've seen him breathe heavily fairly regularly, too over past couple of years.

Should I do something about diet? Currently, I'm feeding him "Nutrifin Max sinking shrimp pellets" almost exclusively, which I know is something I shouldn't do.

Hopefully this will help you guys with diagnosing.

Thanks!

-PB

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Here are the test results

Nitrate-50-ish

Nitrite-safe

Hardness-soft 80-ish

Chlorine-safe

Alkalinity- 80

pH-6.8

Ammonia-0.25 <-----I have a question about this test, is it possible for ammonia tests to "go bad"? It seems no matter how many water changes and how much ammonia remover I add it never seems to change, any ideas?

Thanks :)

-PB

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Nitrate-50..is very high...nitrates should never exceed 40...so more water changes...it is quite possible that the ammonia test is not bad but just that the water quality isn't that good...

pH of 6.8 is low for a goldfish...ideal pH is 7.4-7.6...but the pH should definitely be over 7...you could use a buffer and slowly buff it up...

When you say Nitrite-safe???...what does that mean??..what brand of test kit are you using..is it drop or strip tests??..I would suggest drop test kits for all parameters as they are more accurate...API brand is good...

Can you give us some info on the Filter??..what brand..what size..what is the filtration??..how many time do you do water changes...and how...meaning how do you clean the filter pad etc...is there an airstone in the tank??? Also what dechlorinator do you use???

Edited by SunshineGurl
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Any time a fish sits on the bottom of the tank and breathes heavily, I worry about parasites. Flukes in particular are notorious for causing this symptom - the fish's gills may be partly compromised.... not enough to to kill the fihs, but enough to impact the quality of life. A gravel substrate can allow parasites to hang, dormant, for years and years, waiting for the "right moment" to attack an otherwise stressed fish.

(In all the fish I have seen over the years, I have NEVER seen one with a wen that was truly sucn a burden of weight or one having overgrown the mouth or gills of the fish to the degree that it was threatening the fish's life - or really, well-being. It may look awful to us, but if really studied, the gills are working and the mouth is eating. The fish is fine. Trimming the wen is possible - but the wen will only grow back again in a short time)

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