Jump to content

Cycling 55 Gal


Guest Myrna

Recommended Posts

I am on day 7 of cycling with 1 Shubunkin in on third day and another 1 in tank on day 6. They are less than 2 inches in body length.

In reading cyclying with goldfish, 1 fish was used in a 10 gal. tank as an expample. As of today my ammonia level is 0 ppm.

From the article I understand that ammonia will rise through day 10. I use AP drops for testing. Drops are 6 months old. I have a 29 gal and 27 gal half barrel pond that have been up and running and I used 5 gals.of that water, 4 cups of stones, filter material, 2 PeaceLilies planted in pots and several Pathos Cuttings in tank from established. Also temp is bit high 80 degrees, happens every summer. 2 fish are frisky and swimming constantly, look great.

Would you suggest that I put in more small fish in this size tank to progress with cycling? If the 10 gal example had 1 than perhaps I need 5? New AP drops? I haven't done any water changes.

I've cycled before but never this size tank. Before I mess this up I would appreciate some imput.

My plan being to have fancy GF in this tank and let the Shubunkins grow up in smaller tank, place them in a pond home than. I have had them for 9 months. In the pass I have found they don't do well in small tank as they fill out and get large. Love to have a pond!

Thank U for your time and input. Myrna

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hi! It sounds like you are already doing all the right things. Since you added filter material, etc. from an already established cycle, you may have jump started the cycle on the new tank. If so, you might skip the ammonia, and even nitrite stages.

Try testing for nitrite and nitrate too. If you have no nitrite, and some nitrate, then your cycle is established for the fish you have in there now. By that I mean all the ammonia and nitrite are being processed for those two fish. The cycle will continue as long as you have that amount of fish in the tank. As you introduce more fish, you may get a small bump as the bacteria grow to accommodate the new load.

How many fancies are you planning to have in your 55 gal tank?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Claire already touched the important issues, but I wanted to note a specific point, in case this was also what you wanted to know: a filter can easily be imagines as your tank's 'muscle'. Same as muscles, you can 'train' your filter to cope with more bioload (i.e. more fish), but you need to build it up gradually (say, one goldfish every couple of days). Once a filter is cycled, it can adapt to changes in bioload fairly quickly, but it's as always better to err on the side of caution.

Because of this, again similar to muscles, the 'fltration capacity' of your filter (meaning the conversion speed ammonia->nitrite->nitrate) is directly related to the bioload in your tank (taking into account some lag time of course). If your bioload goes up, the bacteria feast and grow in number. If your bioload decreases, the amount of food for the bacteria is less, and their number decrease accordingly. As such, it doesn't matter how many goldfish are placed into the tank; as long as you take into account that each filter has it's limitations due to size, your filter capacity should always change to accomodate the bioload your fish produce.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

You've gotten some good comments and advice so I only want to say this. Two small fish, even comets, in a 55 gallon tank isn't going to make a dent in the ammonia level. It's very possible that, if you are dedicated to doing large and proper water changes, you may never see significant levels of ammonia, but, if you don't believe that you will be able to deal with housing the additional fish, adding more fish for the sole sake of cycling isn't the best answer. So, you can add more fish as long as you have solid plans on being able to take care of them adequately when they start outgrowing this tank.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi! It sounds like you are already doing all the right things. Since you added filter material, etc. from an already established cycle, you may have jump started the cycle on the new tank. If so, you might skip the ammonia, and even nitrite stages.

Try testing for nitrite and nitrate too. If you have no nitrite, and some nitrate, then your cycle is established for the fish you have in there now. By that I mean all the ammonia and nitrite are being processed for those two fish. The cycle will continue as long as you have that amount of fish in the tank. As you introduce more fish, you may get a small bump as the bacteria grow to accommodate the new load.

How many fancies are you planning to have in your 55 gal tank?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank You Clair for helpfull suggestions. I will continue checking water and think about putting in few more fish. I can put my Shubs back in the half barrel pond at any time.

I would like to have Ryukin and Oranda fancies. How many would be a good number to raise successfully? I will start out slowly.

I love Comets and Shubunkins, had them in a small pond years ago they did so well. Your pond will be a treat for your comets. I did look at the snaps you have here and he is a lovely fish. Have learned the hard way, not so good in a 29 gallon tank.

I tried fancies 8 years ago in 29 gal and only got them to live a year or so, very discouraged and switched to the easier keepers.

This is my 2nd try to reply, the first one got lost somewhere, it may show up on forum and if so I apologize. Will learn how to use this great place eventually!

Hoping for healthy tank and happy long lives for the fish.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Myrna

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Claire already touched the important issues, but I wanted to note a specific point, in case this was also what you wanted to know: a filter can easily be imagines as your tank's 'muscle'. Same as muscles, you can 'train' your filter to cope with more bioload (i.e. more fish), but you need to build it up gradually (say, one goldfish every couple of days). Once a filter is cycled, it can adapt to changes in bioload fairly quickly, but it's as always better to err on the side of caution.

Because of this, again similar to muscles, the 'fltration capacity' of your filter (meaning the conversion speed ammonia->nitrite->nitrate) is directly related to the bioload in your tank (taking into account some lag time of course). If your bioload goes up, the bacteria feast and grow in number. If your bioload decreases, the amount of food for the bacteria is less, and their number decrease accordingly. As such, it doesn't matter how many goldfish are placed into the tank; as long as you take into account that each filter has it's limitations due to size, your filter capacity should always change to accomodate the bioload your fish produce.

Thank you for your informative reply to my question on cycling. Very easy to understand how the process works after reading your post. I will add fish slowly and keep making water tests. Your knowledge is appreciated and I will put it to good use for a healthy tank and fish. Myrna

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You've gotten some good comments and advice so I only want to say this. Two small fish, even comets, in a 55 gallon tank isn't going to make a dent in the ammonia level. It's very possible that, if you are dedicated to doing large and proper water changes, you may never see significant levels of ammonia, but, if you don't believe that you will be able to deal with housing the additional fish, adding more fish for the sole sake of cycling isn't the best answer. So, you can add more fish as long as you have solid plans on being able to take care of them adequately when they start outgrowing this tank.

Thanks for your reply. Your fish are absolutely beautiful! I was thinking as you stated, small Shubs were not making enough waste to effect the ammonia level. Glad I was thinking right. Yes, I have an easy set up to do water changes. I tried very hard doing weekly 50% changes and sometimes 75%, to keep the 3 Shubunkins that I eventually lost, healthy in smaller tank.

Its hard when you see them grow into such pretty fish than watch them go down. Living is learning.

Thanks for your time, Myrna

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
I would like to have Ryukin and Oranda fancies. How many would be a good number to raise successfully? I will start out slowly.

In general there is a 10 gallon per fish rule for fancy goldfish, but that is really a bare minimum. Ryukins and Orandas are the largest of the fancies, and really need much more space than that to achieve their maximum potential. Two fish in your 55 gallon tank would be a good start.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...