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40 Gal Aquarium


Guest fishyfishyfish

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Guest fishyfishyfish

I have decided that i want to put as many fish in my tank (for visual purposes) as is correct for the tank size i have now been told to put no more than 3 oranda's in my 40 (uk) gal tank as they will grow.

However (i know this may go against the grain with fish lovers - i am also a fish lover) but i intend to take them out as they get bigger as i want the tank to look stocked fully now & when they get bigger so i'm intending to start off with a lot of small fish and as they grow take them out so that when they reach a reasonable size i will end up with 3.

The tank is in an area where it gets a lot of viewing so i don't want it to look empty for a few years while they grow plus i will be putting the excess fish into my works communal fish tank (300 gal) as they get bigger. (So it's not like ill be throwing them away to someone who may not look after them corectly)

Q - So with the above in mind can anyone tell me the safe limit for 1&half inch oranda's in my 40 (uk) gal

(I was thinking 10 - as they get bigger ill start removing them. (then ill always have a visually attractive tank) :newfish

Edited by fishyfishyfish
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Guest fishyfishyfish

If you mean my works tank it is semi tropical - with barbs, mollies etc - all small stuff and other goldfish, i keep it at 22 degrees but i would only be putting in the fish when they were of a big enough size. And it's more of a planted aquarium.

So how many small oranda's can i fit in a 10 gal??

Thanks

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I would not put any goldfish in with your mollies and barbs even if the temperture is ok for both species. The barbs may pick on the goldfish and goldfish may grow large enough to consume the mollies. I thought you have a forty gallon. If that is the case I would put only three very small orandas. They would be ok for awhile but eventually you will need bigger tank like a 60 or larger gallon. Then in your second post I see that you have a ten gallon. If this is the case I would not put any goldfish in it because it simply too small. May be one small oranda for a short period of time as you are wait for a larger tank to cycle.

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If you crowd them that much early in life you'll most likely end up with stunted, sickly fish that will never grow big and beautiful like you want. How often do you plan on doing water changes? I bought a tiny oranda a couple of months ago and I'm trying to get him to grow big and healthy to move into my main tank(a 46g with 2 current fish) and I'm keeping him by himself in a 10g tank and feeding him 3 times a day(like I read you're supposed to do with little guys) and I have to do a 60-70% waterchange every 3 days to keep the nitrates low. High nitrates stunt fish.

Aesthetically I know you want a very active tank, but think about the amount of poops 10 goldfish will generate. My little guy poos like a champ and then of course he has to sample his poo several times to make sure it isn't food. Trust me, nothing turns people away from watching a tank quicker than a bunch of fish sampling each others poo! Also, high nitrates can lead to excessive algae growth which is not very pretty either. Most not-fish people look at a tank with algae as a dirty tank which is why there are so many algae-killer products. I try to cultivate green algae in my tropical tank for my fish to eat and I even have people look at that tank as being "dirty" even though the water stats are perfect and many of the fish have outlived their expected lifespans.

Also, please consider that by overstocking the tank that much you are perpetuating the idea that goldfish are low maintenance fish that can be packed into tanks. Even if you're doing large daily waterchanges all of those people passing by the tank are not going to realize that and they may go home and stuff their own uncycled tank with fish without any sort of maintenance or future plans.

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all of those people passing by the tank are not going to realize that and they may go home and stuff their own uncycled tank with fish without any sort of maintenance or future plans.

Correct! It's our responsibility as a good goldfish owners to set an example for others. Even though I do agree that 3 baby orandas in a 40 gal will look somewhat bare, but your long-term plan of putting them in a communal tank with barbs and mollies is not ideal for many different reasons. One example, imagine a squadron of 8-inch long full-grown orandas can do to the plants. They'll decimate them in no time.

Edited by d_golem
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I agree with everything that's been said. It's very tempting to push the limits of stocking, I know I was guilty of it in the past and thought everything would be ok...it wasn't. If you get 4 beautiful little orandas for your 40 gallon, believe me, they will grow FAST and they'll also be nice healthy fish to show off :)

I get more of a reaction from friends/family when they look at my big fish than my tropical tank which is highly stocked with smaller fish, I think there's just something amazing about a nice big goldie :heart

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Guest fishyfishyfish
If you mean my works tank it is semi tropical - with barbs, mollies etc - all small stuff and other goldfish, i keep it at 22 degrees but i would only be putting in the fish when they were of a big enough size. And it's more of a planted aquarium.

So how many small oranda's can i fit in a 10 gal??

Thanks

Just to clarify i have 40 gal at home and 300 gal at work so all i wish to know is how many minimum size (1&half inch) oranda's i can get in with the intention of taking out when they get bigger.

Ok i see your point about mixing them in with my 300 gal tank & thanks, so instead ill sell them back to the pet store.

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Guest fishyfishyfish

OK fair enough ill give it up as a bad job as i see no one will give me the answer i'm looking for - i know your all right but (i admit it's the wrong approach) there is nothing nicer than seeing loads of goldies swimming in a big group together plus i've noticed that when you have a few in they are pretty dull but when there are loads in together the instincts of shoalling kicks back in and they all hang about in a group.

Oh well i guess ill just have to have a boring tank for a while,

On a side note then what should i feed them to get them big quick? Has anyone got some steroids left over from Beijing??? :rolleyes::whatjust:

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We gave you the correct answer. Just not the one you wanted. You could add some really cool decorations to help fill in the space till your babies grow up some.

I feed mine progold and they grow faster then you think.

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OK fair enough ill give it up as a bad job as i see no one will give me the answer i'm looking for - i know your all right but (i admit it's the wrong approach) there is nothing nicer than seeing loads of goldies swimming in a big group together plus i've noticed that when you have a few in they are pretty dull but when there are loads in together the instincts of shoalling kicks back in and they all hang about in a group.

I understand how you feel. I was at a lady's house this week and she has a large bofront tank (I'm thinking 75 gallons) with a TON of small goldies in there and yes, it looked beautiful. She proudly told me how there is one for each member of her extended family. She is not the type to argue with or listen to advice, so I kept my mouth shut- but I really wanted to say to her .... call me in a month when all your fish start flipping over :(

As for foods to feed them, progold is great, I've also had success with Hikari lion head. And of course fresh veggies like peas and brocolli. Also, watching the little ones grow can be a lot less boring than you think ;)

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Hi. I would just like to add, on the visual side of things, empty space is by no means automatically ugly. A large part of most peices of art is the negative space. A minimalist look may just add more interest to the tank than having it overstocked. The right decorations in the right spot could create a frame that would make the tank both eyecatching and beautiful.

To add to the point about the shoaling, the four goldfish at my parents work will keep together in a group most of the time. It also seems that when people have pairs or threes the fish will also stay together, though it does depend on the individual fish.

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To answer your question, the absolute maximum you should have in your tank is 4, at any size. If you don't mind constant water changes and monitering your tank levels all the time, you might be able to manage overstocking the tank at 5 or 6 small goldfish, as long as you plan to move the extra goldfish to a more suitable home in the near future as they continue to grow. Even then I would not recomend it. Stick with 4. Or, if a pet store near you sells full grown goldfish, you can simply get two of those. Two full grown orandas in a 40 gallon would not look sparse at all!

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