Jump to content

New Tank


Anic

Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

My grandma bought me a used 75 gallon tank and stand. They had an iguana in the tank, but it was rehomed. The tank doesn't look like it can hold water that well, seeing as part of the frame is coming coming off. I had planned on getting a corn snake sometime after we had moved out of our apartment. I was going to move my 3 fancies into the 55, my 2 single-tails in my future pond OR in the 75 gallon if it will hold water. And the snake would get the 29 with lots of branches to climb on to try and make up for the lack of floor.

I'm half paying attention to what I type because Larry has a movie on, so sorry if it doesn't make sense.

My questions:

1. Is there any way for me to fix the frame, or will it not affect the way it holds water?

2. What is a good strong wood that I can build a new stand with?

Oh, yea. No pics because I can't get my computer to cooperate with Photobucket. Sorry :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Depending on what part of the frame is coming off, and to what extent, it will affect the strength of the tank. A 75g will have cross-braces to keep the glass sides from bowing out, so the frame is pretty important. In a smaller tank, such as a 10 or 20, the frame isn't as important. If you can find a way to post pics then I may be able to give some advice.

As for wood, almost anything will work. I've seen stands made of stud-grade (cheap and ugly) 2x4's, and they seem rock-solid. There are plans for DIY stands here in the forums, all over the internet (search: DIY tank stand), and here: http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/diy_list.php

Generally, a nice stand will have a sturdy frame covered with decorative panels, so you can use a strong wood for the frame, and a more beautiful wood for the visible parts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • Regular Member

Sorry it took so long. Here's the whole shebang: 100_2734.jpg

And here is a pic of where the trim is coming off. I can't find my tape measure, so I don't know how long the section is. 100_2740.jpg

I will try to get better ones later tonight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

That doesn't look too bad. The section of trim you're showing simply looks like it has come unglued; this will probably be an easy repair. Make sure the sealant is holding up all around the inside of the tank.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

So, as long as the sealant is intact, it will hold water? I didn't think to fill it before I brought it home, but it was free so I wasn't about to complain.

There is one corner that looks like it would need re-sealed. Should I re-do the whole tank, or can I get away with just the corner?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

You may be okay just redoing the bad spot, but I agree that it would be best to re-seal the whole tank just to be safe. That's a bit of a project for a tank that size, and the sealant will need to sit and dry for at least a week (until the "vinegar" scent is gone), but the sealant shouldn't be too expensive (you can find it online for a lot less than in stores). I sealed a 26 gallon tank, and I started out a bit clumsily, but by the end I felt like a pro.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Could I get away with huge tubes of clear sealant? I've used that for decorations before with no ill effects.

Also, could I do one area at a time instead of stripping the whole thing? And will I need to use bungee straps to hold the tank together until it's "cured"?

Does it matter what glue I use for the trim? Just superglue, or should I use sealant?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Aquarium sealant is clear silicone sealant. I wouldn't use just any household sealant, though, because you never know what's in it that may be harmful to your fish. If you're talking about huge tubes of aquarium sealant, then yes that is what you can use. The tank will hold together without the sealant along the inside. I wouldn't fill it with water in such a condition, but it will be fine during your work.

I tried to edit my last post and add some stuff about the trim, but my internet service crashed. I think the bottom trim is held on with aquarium sealant (they run a bead of sealant around the trim and stick it on the tank) but I may be wrong. I know that the top trim is held like that. Modern "all glass" home aquariums are very sturdy without having a significant frame, compared to old steel-framed tanks (they have a metal frame around the bottom, top, and vertical edges).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Ok, since we'll be moving soon, my mom told me that I can stash the tank at her house until I can get around to re-sealing it. Which might be awhile, because we have no room for it right now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...