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Cyropro? Anchor Worm Medicine Help?


Guest Oranda's R HxC

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Guest Kayla's Goldfish

If this is in the wrong place, I am sorry but I really wasnt sure were to put this but I bought CyroPro that my lfs swears by... But I want another opinion, can anyone tell me if this works?

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I did a little reading in a few of my chemistry books and talked to my vet this morning (we are good friends). As neare as I can figure, Cyromazine is a chemical closely akin to Melamine (!) that has been used for years as a topical incecticide for many different animals - from dogs and cats to chickens and horses. It works by interupting the nervous system of the immature insects it treats..... much like th newer flea medications do. If the connection between the brain and the autonomici system is interrupted, the heart and lungs of the insect fail to work - and it dies. Most drugs of this nature are only effective against insect life - they do not affect mammal, and (in a smaller subset of such drugs) do not affect birds, fish, reptiles.

I have never used Cyromazine in any form - Cyropro, however, does seem to be a rather "time-honored" treatment of Cyromazine that is used in fish for external parasites. I do not know if it would effect adult anchorworm, or, would, perhaps, end the infestation by eliminating all the immature swimmers, thus ending the parasitism of your fish.

I have always used Dimilin - (diflubenzuron) - to eliminate anchorworm and other external parasites on fish. It works well and quickly - and, at least in the past - has been readily availabel for very little money. I bought some..... last year? I think - from BigAls Online. Dimilin does kill insects rather indescriminately - and it is better if it is not dumped in volume in waste water -for if released, it can, potentially kill where you do not wish it to. For that matter, however, most of this type of chemical treatments for exoparasites ALSO have the same downside. The good thing is that, in the small volumes of water and small treatment doseages home fish keeping usually requires, the impact on the environment is virtually non-measureable.

I would use it - Hikari seems to have a good history with this product. If, in the future, you want an alternative, you might want to try Dimilin. I keep Prazi, Dimilin and salt in my arsenal. With those three things, there are few parasites that I cannot conquer.

Good luck at geting rid of AnchorWorms. KEep an eye on the wounds they cause - secondary infection is a pain in the tank.

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Guest Kayla's Goldfish

OK also, I think my Oranda has a new worm burrying into her wen! I am very very VERY worried that it'll go to her brain and kill her? Am I exagerating? I only see a red spot on her wen but I am sure the rest will come soon. I can't lose her, I love her, she's my baby. :(

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Parasites won't bury completely inside an animal. They need to allow the end part of them to remain outside so they can breathe. If you do your med treatment according to directions (remember to remove the media from your filter) and keep the water very clean, you should be able to get this under control. Because you have a substrate, sand, you are going to need to vacuum that extremely, extremely well so that no laid eggs are allow to hatch. In fact, as I suggested in your other thread, you should start to remove that. Again, also on thee other thread it's been suggested that you can remove the worm yourself, so you still might want to consider doing this. Maybe you could get your dad to help you.

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Guest Kayla's Goldfish

I was thinking about it earlier, I am a little scared but I think I am going to try and tweeze them and I am getting rid of the sand all together.. I just don't know exactly how to remove it? So my Oranda's brain is protected? lol I love her so much and the last thing I want is for something to happen to her. :( Or the other fish.

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Yes, her brain will be fine.

I know it's really scary to think about pulling out a worm off your fish. I haven't had to remove an anchor worm myself, but here is some instructions I found:

"You should kill all visible worms by dabbing them with a cotton swab, dipped in Potassium Permanganate or an anti-parasitic medication (in this case, your Cyropro). Then you should carefully remove them from the fish with tweezers. You should kill the parasites before removing them because . . . removing them alive could cause the fish pain and physical damage. Once you?ve removed the parasite, you should then dab the wounds with Methylene Blue (or any other med that says it's effective against superficial secondary infections) to prevent secondary bacterial infections from occurring. It is highly recommended that you feed the fish with medicated food."

You might try EMing CountryLovah. She did it and she was scared at first. I'm sure she could reassure you about it and talk you through the process.

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Guest Kayla's Goldfish

Eeek. :/ IDK.. But I did go barebottom now the tank is doing good, looks much better I just washed and threw back in some marbles.

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Removing your sand will help a lot ot end any parasite problems. All the eggs and larva that were "waiting" to attack will be gone from it. (Watch your cycle!)

If you hvae ONLY one identifyable worm, I would actually recommend AGAINST trying to remove it. The medication will kill it and it will drop off on its own. If the worm gets to the point where it has a big strong body that you will be able to grasp easily, fine. But be gentle. Dab at the spot with a little hydrogen peroxide if your mom has it - she should. Hold the fish gently in your hand OVER the fish tank. Take a cotton swab and wet the area that is reddening. If it is a worm, it will kill it. If it is a subsequent infection from past worms, a bit of fungus from wen growth or a slight injury from whatever, the area will be nicely cleaned and should start to heal. After wetting it, set the fish gently back in the water and treat as described above.

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Guest Kayla's Goldfish

Well, if this is possible, I think I actually saw a worm that dropped off in the water, so I netted it and put it on a napkin and it looked like the picture, also my Oranda only has one worm left now. Will the hydrogen peroxide hurt the fish at all? Also, I can see more worms now that I looked much closer. There is one on each of my black moores, two now on my fantail and now one on my Oranda

Edited by Kayla's Goldfish
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