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Denitrator?


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I was tooling around with the idea of getting a denitrator for my goldie tank......I just set up a new tank and I am in the process of cycling the new tank so nitrAtes are't a problenm as of yet. But being the "Over protective Goldfish Dad" that I am, I am always looking for ways that could improve my goldfishs' quality of life....which increases my quality if life ! Anyway here is the Denitrator I was thinking of getting sometime in the next couple of months...... http://www.aquaripure.com/ What do you all think?

Rich

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Hi there and welcome to Koko's. We love conscientious goldfish dads around here!

Accumulating nitrates are the bane of every established goldfish aquarium. Most people around here with reasonably stocked aquariums do 50-75% water changes at least once a week. I generally change water on my main tank every 4-5 days. This helps to keep nitrates in check, but it also (just as importantly) keeps the level of harmful bacteria in the water low. The level of nitrates in your water is generally considered a good indicator of the level of pathogenic bacteria in the water. Even if you are using a filter to remove nitrate, you still need to do water changes in order to remove bacteria. In order to keep the level of bacteria low, many of us do a 100% water change every 6-8 weeks.

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How much water do you think would need to be changed if you are using a product like this then? I know keeping the nitrates under 40 ppm is challanging enough doing 50% weekly water changes. I used to have a denitrifier on my reef tank when I had one and it worked wonderfully....I figured that on a goldfish tank it should work even better since corals are more sensitive to nitrAtes then fish are......So do you think this would be a useful product in a fancy goldie tank? Thanks for your input!!!

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acupunk, what would be your thought on using a denitrator with a UV sterilizer?

I have a large UV sterilizer on my 75 gallon tank (the monster one from Goldfish Connection). I do think it gives you an extra protection against accumulation of bacteria and fungi in the water, but I would not use it as license to skip water changes.

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How much water do you think would need to be changed if you are using a product like this then?

There is no way to give a universal answer to this question. The answer depends on the size of your tank, how many fish you have, how much you feed, what you feed, what kind of mechanical filtration you use and how often you clean your mechanical filters, the chemistry of your tap water, etc., etc.

The denitrator would do nothing to remove harmful bacteria and fungi from your water. Depending on your tap water chemistry, you would also need to do water changes to replenish carbonate (which is consumed in the course of breaking ammonia down into nitrite and nitrate) in order to maintain pH. In order to be safe, you would probably still want to do a 50% water change on a weekly basis. With a Python (a minimal investment compared to the cost of the denitrator) a 50% water change is a snap.

There is certainly some value in maintaining zero nitrate all the time -- it would be healthier for your fish than having nitrate gradually accumulate over the course of the week to 40 ppm. Have you used this particular brand of denitrator in the past? I would be interested in knowing if you were satisfied with it -- I would consider adding one to my tank in the interest of maintaining zero nitrate (rather than to avoid water changes).

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Well i would never suggest that this product would replace water changes. Let's face it when you have a closed system (a fish tank) you need to do water changes to keep the water fresh. I liken it to air filters in a smokey room. That being said, in the past with reef tanks I used a de-nitrator to remove nitrates (not this particular product) and I had wonderful results. My corals and anemones thrived as did my fish. My system was so good i had a breeding pair of wil percula clowns that bred all the time (this is a very rare occurance in salt water aquariums) which i attributed to my water quality being near perfect. I guess my point to this post is this, if I had such great sucess with this in a salt water aquarium would that sucess trasfer to goldfish? I know I'm not comparing apples to apples on this but i don't think that apples are that disimilar (maybe Macintosh apples ;) I'm just trying to "pick the minds" of the experts since it has been awhile since i was in the game....

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I am quite new to saltwater fish keeping (I have a small FOWLR tank with a clownfish, a shrimp, and a star fish but it has only been set up about 10 weeks), so I can't give you too much insight into the apples to oranges comparison. We had a debate around here a few weeks back about which type of tank requires more maintenance -- salt water or goldfish. The conclusion that we reached is that goldfish require more maintenance.

I think that you know enough about fish to know that having healthy, thriving fish is more about water keeping than fish keeping. Keeping ammonia and nitrite zero and nitrate as close to zero as possible is certainly a big part of that, so perhaps a denitrator would help. Individual goldfish seem to vary in their sensitivity to nitrate, with some fish responding with stress to relatively low levels. If you intend to keep very specialized breeds of fancy goldfish (such as pearlscales, for instance) keeping your nitrate levels very low would be more important.

Hopefully Daryl will stop by to comment on this thread. She has more experience with tank maintenance and various types of filtration that just about anyone else around here -- I am sure she will have insight to offer.

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I have had all types of aquariunms since i was a kid, worked in a pet store through college and kept the most delicate salt water fish alive for years (Moorish Idol, Regal angel, etc). Fancy goldfish are by far more labor intensive then any aquarium that I have kept. However, I will say that the equipment used for reef tanks and goldfish tanks are very different. Salt water aquariums tend to be very complicated (and expensive) as compared to goldfish aquariums. which is why I'm very curious about the denitrator. I will admit that I am a HUGE gadget guy so part of me is really hoping that this would work just so it gives me something to tinker with ;p

Edited by Deahttub
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I have to admit that I have a weakness for gadgets as well. Now you've got my wheels turning about something that I can spend another $250.00 on...

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I wanted to mention that if you're itching to get a gadget, I would recommend that you spend your money on a UV sterilizer before you get a denitrator. I have this one on my tank:

https://www.goldfishconnection.com/shop/det...40&catId=23

It has a remarkable effect on clarifying the water and it actually kills 99.9% of bacteria and parasites in the water. This has a huge benefit for your fish because rather than putting energy into constantly fighting off pathogens in the water, they can direct their energy into growing and playing!

This is the list of the pathogens that the above UV unit will kill:

Chilodinella Costia Epistylis Heximita Ichthyophithirius Multifilis (freshwater Ich) Trichodina Flukes - Dactylogyrus and Gyrodactylus Argulus Lernea (Anchor worm) Aeromonas - hydrophila, salmonicida Certomyxa shasta Edwardsiella - Septicemia Flexibacter columinaris Mycobacterium fortuitum ? Tuberculosis Pseudomonas - flourescens, putida, anguilliseptia, aeruginosa Sacrina lutea Saprolegenia hyphae.

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I think I may have changed my mind to this particluar DeNitrator...... http://www.marinedepot.com/ps_ViewItem~idP...ct~KL9111K.html For several reasons, 1) it looks easier to maintain (clean) and 2) you don't have to feed it.....I will note that the water that comes out of the denitrator may be nitrAte free, however there is one drawback....it also comes out oxygen free so it is vital that the return be put in a highly oxygenated area, I.E. your filter....as long as it is put in the filter the lack of oxygen shouldn't be a problem as it only drips out at a drop per second.....

Edited by Deahttub
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