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Scruffy

Rules Of Thumb For Ponds

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I'm one of those crazy comet fans who bought some feeders and raised them in a tank. My babies are about 18-24 months old now and they're getting big! Not necessarily because of this, but a desire to do some more sophisticated landscaping, we are looking into digging a pond in our backyard. My questions are regarding what pump to get and the number of gallons needed per fish.

I know that in a tank, it's best for each single-tailed goldfish to have at least 20 gallons each and that the filter should be capable of running 10 times in the volume of the tank in an hour. For example, a 10 gallon tank would need a 100 gph filter at the very least. Do the rules change in a pond?

If we do it at all, it would have to be with a solar pump and I'm thinking it might be hard to find a big enough one at a reasonable price. I have so many other questions, but I'll start with this.

Thanks,

Scruffy

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I'm one of those crazy comet fans who bought some feeders and raised them in a tank. My babies are about 18-24 months old now and they're getting big! Not necessarily because of this, but a desire to do some more sophisticated landscaping, we are looking into digging a pond in our backyard. My questions are regarding what pump to get and the number of gallons needed per fish.

I know that in a tank, it's best for each single-tailed goldfish to have at least 20 gallons each and that the filter should be capable of running 10 times in the volume of the tank in an hour. For example, a 10 gallon tank would need a 100 gph filter at the very least. Do the rules change in a pond?

If we do it at all, it would have to be with a solar pump and I'm thinking it might be hard to find a big enough one at a reasonable price. I have so many other questions, but I'll start with this.

Thanks,

Scruffy

Another crazy comet fan here. The gallons per fish is the same for ponds or tanks, however, this is only a rule-of-thumb. 50 inches of fish of your size in a 1000 gallon pond is fine. Two 25 inch fish in a 1000 gallon pond is ridiculous! The most important thing about a filter is the biomass, the size of the biological colony that oxidizes ammonia within the filter. If the biomass is too small, no amount of water flow will make up for it. The gph rate does not need to be anywhere near the 10 : 1 ratio you claim for a tank, 2 or 3 : 1 should be fine. JUST REMEMBER THE BIOMASS!

Minimal Fish + Lots of Plants + Good Filtration = A Healthy Pond

As far as building a new pond, there is WAY TOO MUCH information needed than can be discussed here. The internet is a great tool; take the time to find out all you can before beginning a project like this. Mistakes made now are very hard to correct later.

Good luck.

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As PHYLAL mentioned, more gallons per fish is better. It is a lot easier to do large volumes of water in ponds than in tanks, and an increase in water volume relative to the number/size of fish means that waste is more dilute in the pond than in a tank.

Thus, in ponds you don't need to have the 10:1 ratio for filtration. As for the pump... why would it have to be solar? Is the pond going to be that far from the nearest electrical connection? It will be possible to do a pond with solar pumps, but the equipment is very expensive.

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filtration on a pond needs to run 24/7 as does a tank. Left off the biobugs will die off.

There are great sites out there that will help you decide what you want in a pond and then help put together what is necessary for it. Can't mention them here they get ***** . Start searching they are out there.

Filtration in a pond should be 10% of the volume of the pond in filtration. So a 1000 gallon pond should have filters of 100 gallons. There are bottom drains, settlement tanks, skimmers. All have their functions to help keep the pond clean and the fish healthy. There are DIY filters as well as filters that can be purchased. You need to know what your limitations are. How much maintenance do you want to do, how much money to spend. Ponding is more than digging and hole, dropping in a liner, filling it up and put in fish. There are still water changes to do, filters to clean. Keep the bottom clean..just like in a tank..no rocks on the bottom. Bottom drain to a settlement tank does so much for keeping the bottom clean.

External pumps are more efficient to run than internal ones.

Depth of pond will have to be determined by your climate. Hot summers need deeper ponds, cold winters need deeper ponds. More is always easier to maintain than less as far as pond size/gallons. Just like it can be easier to maintain an 100 gallon tank vs 10 gallons. Smaller volumes give smaller margins for error.

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