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A More Attractive Alternative To A Rubbermaid Stock Tank


Acupunk

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I have had a 100 gallon Rubbermaid stock tank on my front porch for the past several months, it housed several feeder common goldfish and a hardy lily plant. Honestly, it was a little bit of an eye sore so I had been on the lookout for something else. On Sunday I found it at my local grocery store! They had these HUGE plastic plant pots that are made to look like terracotta but are actually lightweight plastic. The one I got is 85 gallons. I filled it up yesterday and moved over my filter and the fish and have already gotten several compliments on it. Because it is light-colored, it is easier to see the fish that it was to see them in the black stock tank.

Here are some photos:

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Those are an excellent idea Kristen!

I think the reason why some of us stick to rubbermaid is because of the quality of the plastic. For instance, although the "planter tank" would be much more convenient, in Arizona, with the arid weather and constant sun beating down, I think the planter tank would dry up, crack and leak in no time. The rubbermaid stock tanks were made to hold water in all sorts of weather conditions, so would probably last much longer. :D

But of course... not all of us live in Arizona. Hehe. ;)

The planter tank would really be nice for shaded areas or even indoors though! :exactly

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Yeah, I know what you mean about the durability of the stock tank. I live in Texas, which is not Arizona, but IS very hot. The thing that persuaded me to buy the pot was that it has a 10 year warranty for outdoor use. It is actually not plastic, but polyethylene. I will report back at the end of the summer on how it looks.

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That looks really pretty, Kristen! I have a small screened in porch and I've thought about putting something like that out there but don't really have the room for a stock tank. My question, though is wouldn't you have to bring the fish inside in the winter? My youngest brother lives in San Antonio so I know your winters aren't very bad usually, but here in Indiana they can get as brutal as the summers. That would be my problem is having a place to put them indoors.

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I bought the lily from a water garden store in my town. They have numerous small stock tanks (50 and 100 gallons) with goldfish in them. They said that they are able to overwinter the fish in them with no problem. Around here it only freezes a few times each winter. I am planning on covering the pot with a heavy canvas tarp and changing the filter output so that the water returning from the filter doesn't come into contact with the air (and therefore cool down). I am hoping that these two strategies, along with the fact that the pot is immediately adjacent to my house and is protected from the wind will enable us to have a successful outdoor winter. Worst case scenario I will use a heater (which would be expensive electricity-wise, I know).

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Yeah, I know what you mean about the durability of the stock tank. I live in Texas, which is not Arizona, but IS very hot. The thing that persuaded me to buy the pot was that it has a 10 year warranty for outdoor use. It is actually not plastic, but polyethylene. I will report back at the end of the summer on how it looks.

oh please do! if it lasts for a while, i would definitely be interested in maybe getting one for the porch or something. :D

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That looks lovely Kirsten! :) Considering that it is shaded part or all of the time I think it will weather well. Another bonus is that the size and shape is easy to insulate in winter, there is plenty of light weight insulating material available, like those silver first aid blankets, etc. Even if heating was required, it wouldn't use that much electricity provided the pot was well covered and insulated.

ps. what a lovely neat lawn you have.

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That looks lovely Kirsten! :) Considering that it is shaded part or all of the time I think it will weather well. Another bonus is that the size and shape is easy to insulate in winter, there is plenty of light weight insulating material available, like those silver first aid blankets, etc. Even if heating was required, it wouldn't use that much electricity provided the pot was well covered and insulated.

ps. what a lovely neat lawn you have.

Ooooo... thanks for the insulating blanket idea. That is a good one that I will have to remember for the winter.

P.S. We hire the lawn done -- the best $35 per week we have ever spent! We have a St. Augustine grass lawn that requires edging every week and guzzles water like crazy. The builder put it in, we would have made another choice. Small town Texas has not yet gotten on board with xerascaping.

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We only get lawn when it rains. Our front yard stays patchy and slightly green, our backyard turns into a dust bowl with the dogs. Luckily we have moved into a La Nina cycle and have finally got some rain this year. :happydance

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Ooh, what a great idea!! You might post this in the tips and suggestions forum, too.

I really love that idea. I just moved about 400 plants to my mom's so I don't think I'll get anymore flower pots soon but WOW I wish I could set one up! I really love this idea.

As for overwintering, I attempted that last winter with my 40 gallon outdoor tub. I put a 300w heater on it and it kept it to about 70 degrees, but I was so worried that we might have a power outage, and the temp would drop too suddenly. I like the idea of insulating the pot, though. That seems like it may work.

And at the risk of sounding ignorant, what is xerascaping??

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And at the risk of sounding ignorant, what is xerascaping??

Xerascaping means using native plants in landscaping, rather than water guzzlers like St. Augustine grass in Texas. :krazy: I grew up in Colorado (generally more progressive place than most parts of Texas) and lived in a neighborhood where most residents landscaped their yards with native prairie grasses, native wild flowers, cacti, rocks, and gravel. This type of landscaping requires minimal watering and maintenance and can survive drought conditions without dying. Some neighborhoods in Colorado even prohibit residents from owning and using lawnmowers and blowers. You would be amazed at how much pollution (air and noise) gas powered blowers, trimmers, and lawnmowers generate.

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Guest Paradise-Panda

that thing is so pretty. I'm in Texas too and I usually just run a heater in our stock tank in the garage that keeps the tank in the 60s. That seems to work pretty well out here in the hill country :)

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Guest Montman

Great idea. Looks good.

I've been thinking about trying the 1/2 whisky barrel and liner - but I'm not sure just how much water those hold.

Probably not that much.

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