Jump to content

Born Free


Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

Well, my yabby wasn't exactly born free, he/she was probably born in a hatchery and we bought 2 of them four years ago at a school fete. A few months ago one of them just died for some unknown reason so I decided to release the other one to enjoy it's prime in the wild and do all the exciting things that yabbies do. It had grown to 7" so it's most worrying predator would be humans, so I put on my gumboots and slipped and slid down the embankment, then I poured him out of the bucket onto the muddy bank and without any hesitation (or so much as a backward glance) he headed straight for the water and jumped in with a backwards somersault. He/she seemed to know exactly what it was doing, I hope he/she is having a good time down there in South Creek.

All during the adventure I was narrating a wildlife documentary in my head about freeing yabbies, lol.

So today when we went to the lfs to get some algae wafers, Garion and I decided to raise some more yabbies and free them when they reach adulthood at around 2 years of age. We bought 2 little feeder yabbies about 1-2" each. When we got home we noticed that one was the standard "d-a-m buster" yabbie and the other was different. An internet search identified it as a Queensland Red Claw Maroon, a popular species for aquaculture, so this will be interesting. Our standard yabby has one claw missing but it should grow back, on the same side it is also missing 3 legs! I wonder if they will grow back? This little one is definately at a disadvantage and the red claw is acting very territorial and chasing it all the time, so even though they are only tiny I might have to give them their own tanks already. (sigh)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
(or so much as a backward glance)

Lol I hear your Mother's instincts. I am quite sure he is having the time of his life and learning all sorts of new things.

We had to release our crayfish too years ago when they got big. Your new babies sound nice though, even if they seem to be at each others throats right now, do you think you could have a male and female and some overactive breeding behavior or are they too young?

PS Good to see you on. Hadn't seen you much this week :heart

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

The legs should definitely grow back after a couple molts. Crustaceans are excellent at regenerating themselves.

Usually I advise against releasing anything into the wild but I know Australia is a bit different than here in the US?you really only have access to creatures that are native there, right? In the US there are an awful lot of problems that arise when people release unwanted pets because they can carry harmful pathogens back into the wild that weren't there before, and they overtake native species. That is why here in California so many things are illegal to keep as pets. In south Florida they have a problem with exotic creatures escaping and thriving in the climate there and then reproducing.

That is why we can no longer buy apple snails here, too. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I know the issues in the US. In Japan there are creeks that are chock full of crayfish and these are taken by people all the time as pets and then returned. Its a kind of unwritten borrow a pet thing. I wonder if thats the same as Oz. I wouldn't do this for any other creature except river crayfish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I wish we could be like that here. It's so sad that there are so many things now that are illegal to keep as pets. California in particular is extremely strict. :( I saw some apple snails recently and was so tempted to set up a tank for them, not knowing if I'd ever be able to get them again!

In Japan (and Australia) do you guys ever see the really pretty blue crayfish? We got those in to the pet store from time to time and they are so beautiful!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I've never seen any but the red clawed crays here in Japan. The blue sound really pretty. I swear there is nothing as cute as baby crayfish begging for food with their tiny pincers up out of the water :D

I hope you can locate some apple snails again soon. Still unsure why they are so rare over there..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hi Trinket, yep, mothering instincts happen even with yabbies, lol. The two new crayfish won't breed as they are different species and crayfish are very particular about their breeding partners, lol. Jenny, the yabby I released is a d-a-m buster yabby, the most common and widespread in Australia so it was going back into it's natural habitat. The red claws are from the tropical north so I don't know if they would manage our winter in the wild (need more research), the red claw is the only imported species allowed into the UK for this reason, it cannot compete with the native species if it gets released. As for pathogens and parasites, hmmn, good point, thankfully our crayfish population are free of the nasties that are found in the US and Asia so releasing them isn't a problem. There are some benefits to being an island continent, our bee population is the only one left in the world free from that nasty pest, although experts believe it is only a matter of time before contamination happens.

What a shame about your apple snails but I understand it is a big problem in many countries, along with introduced land species of snails. The world is getting smaller all the time.

ps. yes we get the electric blue crayfish, they can be either red claws or ###### busters, just a question of selective breeding and encouraging blue colouration with blue surroundings. Crayfish will imitate their surroundings as a camoflague tactic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

No way Michelle, they are very resilient, at least the d-a-m buster, Cherax destructor is. There are over 100 species of freshwater crayfish in Australia but only the 3 Cherax species are sold as pets or farmed in aquaculture.

http://www.mylot.com/w/image/1049388.aspx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Wikipedia has them listed as threatened, it's on the right hand side of the page underneath the pic.

Guess someone told them wrong, it sounds like Oz is crawling with them!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I think the world conservation union must have the countries mixed up, perhaps in some other countries the native crayfish are vulnerable due to introduced species such as our Cherax destructor. :idont

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...