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How Do I Take Clear Pictures Of My Aquarium?


Guest goldfishnut

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Guest goldfishnut

I have tried to take pictures of my goldfish to post on this site to proudly show them off, but the pictures keep coming out blurry I don't know if it's

my camera ( a 35mm) or the conditions of light and water? anyone have any ideas,please!

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mine always come out better with the flash OFF. i am using a digital, so is a bit different i know. flash off, and usually propped up on something so i don't have to hold it (i get shakey hands!!).

other than that - practice, practice, a lot of luck and...yep, practice! it's the advantage to digital, that you don't waste rolls and rolls of film, which is what i was doing before :) . if you perhaps post this in goldfish photos you might catch more photographers!

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I always had that problem. No matter what I did, I got blurry pictures. With the flash ON it would reflect strangey. With the flash off, it was blurry.. I happened to buy a new digital camera a while back and for whatever reason, it just works!!!! I hardly get ANY bad pictures. Well, I mean, the fish sometimes aren't looking, but the actual quality of the photo is usually good. Just gets a nice clear shot of the fishes butt sometimes LOL. I wish I could help you out, but for me I just got lucky! (I've got 3 different types of sony digitals, all of them work great for fish. Don't know why, but they are the ones I like for fish pics. The cheapest was about $100, and the expensive one was $500 and they all work excellent with the tanks)

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Hey CountryLovah... well! if you give those little guys room to scurry, they will! Unless you have a very, very nice camera that has different speed settings, you'll never get a clear picture. If you're taking a picture of your whole aquarium, just to show the aquarium, then don't worry about the fish holding still. If you're wanting to take a nice picture of each individual fish and you don't have a camera with speed settings, I've found the best thing to do is to isolate the fish in such a small space it can't move, just for the period of time, of course, that you're taking the picture. If it's a big fish, put it in a very small tank. If it's a smaller fish, isolate it with a clear bowl over it so it doesn't move. Oh, and use the micro (flower) setting. Snap the pic and release. Hah! Snap and release?! Instead of catch and release... get it...? hmmm.... :hmm okay, so it's not totally funny! :rofl

Edited by lynda441
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Hi there. My advice is this. Turn off your bubblers if you have them. The bubbles tend to look strange in my photos. If you do decide to use a flash, (with a flash you do get crisper pictures) use it in the dark. I point my camera at the fish tank side ways (see diagram below). That way the reflection of the flash on glass is not dead on in the picture, plus the complete dark seems to somewhat absorb some of the light. And of course, it is going to take many, many, many pics to get the right one. :)

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Edited by ~SHAWNA~
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I've found that lighting conditions have an enormous effect: try to get something similar to bright sunlight, in such a way that when you put your camera on automatic flash, it 'decides' that it's not necessary to use it. That way you easily get a high shutterspeed without getting a dark picture, and you avoid any flash reflections. It also cuts down on the 'noise' you might get from any (dust) particles that float in the water. For the same reason it's true that it's a good idea to turn off your bubbler, if it produces lots of small bubbles (I've rigged our bubbles to mainly produce large bubbles, so it doesn't affect the photos much). Also for the same reason it's best to take pictures some time after a w/c, so that there's only a low concentration of dust particles in the water but the gravel particles (if you have any 'fine' gravel in your tank) will have had time to settle down.

A last thing: if you're using a digital camera, you can cut down on the reaction time of the camera by already focussing it on a general area a number of seconds before you actually take the picture, that way the distance and brightness focus can be what you want it to be (more or less) before you take the picture. You can do this by focussing on some ornaments with the right distance and (reflection) brightness to be good for a gf picture. If you have an analogue camera (of whatever you call a non-digital one :) ) the latter few tips probably wont be of any use though.

Hope this helps a bit.

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