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Anubias


rocmills

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So... I was reading about Anubias here and on another site, and I gather that this stuff wants its roots to run free, they do not want to be buried in the gravel. Is this correct?

I bought three medium sized Anubias last week, and they came in small, slotted pots with soft padding filling the pots. Should I remove them from the pots? Should I remove this soft material from around the roots? (if i can do so without harming the roots)

I also bought a much, much larger Anubias with a huge root ball which I have been struggling to keep under the gravel... this is bad, right? I have a nice chunk of wood in the tank which I could tie the Anubias to... is this the correct thing to do?

In summary... should I unpot the three mediums and tie the large one to the wood? The mediums I have are the exact kind as shown in the thumbnail photo at the top of this page. The large is... well, the same thing but much larger. LOL

--Roc

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What needs to be above the gravel or substrate is the rhizome, the thicker part of the root. The smaller offshoot roots can be buried in gravel just fine.

I would remove the three medium ones from the pots and pick away the material around their roots. It is probably rock wool and will pull apart easily. After that if you wish to tie them to something, or try to get the small roots in the gravel while leaving the thick one above it, either method should work.

These plants can and do do well when tied to driftwood or rocks, so if you like the look, go ahead and attach the large one to your wood.

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Thanks for the confirmation! That's what I thought I read, but I wanted to be sure. Now I need to go out and find me some fishing line... I've got plenty of lead fishing weights and lead plant weights, but nothing to tie them up with.

--Roc

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Guest Isilme

A few years ago I bought a little Anubias for my tropical tank and just burried it in the gravel. After three years is was grown to a really big, healty bush of leaves (and sometimes flowers!), so my Anubias didn't suffer from putting him into gravel. I even took it out of the tank, broke it into two pieces and planted the first back into the tropic tank and the second (after QT and rinsing) in my coldwater aquarium. That was two years ago and the Anubias in the cold tank also grew as cabbage. For my new tank I also just used pieces of the mother plant and burried them into the gravel. They are doing just fine...

Are you sure about using lead weights in your tank? I never heard about this, but it seems to me that putting lead in your tank is quit toxic?

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I was uneasy about the lead weights at first, and I haven't put any of the fishing weights in yet as I don't have anything to tie the plants with at the moment (have to buy some fishing line one of these days). However, the plant weights that you buy at the fish store are also made of lead - and if those are safe I can't imagine why fishing weights would be any different. I wouldn't mind hearing from an "expert" here, though... I know that just because a pet store sells something doesn't mean it is actually safe or wise to use, hence my procrastination on putting any more lead in the tank than what is already there.

One of the potted Anubias has already been eaten down to stems and I don't know if it will come back. The other two potted ones have been nibbled but not too much. The large plant seems to intimidate the goldies and they haven't touched it, nor have the eaten on the grass-like plants or the Cabomba (which I can't get to stay in place no matter how many plant weights i attach to it).

--Roc

Edited by rocmills
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I wouldn't use lead fishing weights. The plant ones you get are coated so it dosen't leach into the water. Even then it is safer to use river rocks or driftwood to tie them to. If you don't want a huge bag of rocks try looking at a craft store for the small bags of river rocks.

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Harumph. Why is it never easy and convenient with these fish? Sheesh. And fishermen are polluting our lakes and rivers and oceans with bad lead? What next!?! Okay, okay, done complaining, it's just been one of those days - again.

Small river rocks I have... what I don't have is any way to tie them to the plants. They are smooth rocks in a tank with rowdy fish, if I just loop some fishing line around the rocks they are going to get nudged/bashed off. I don't have any mesh bags except what is housing my bio-media and I can't sacrifice that. So... another trip to the fish store to buy little mesh bags to put the rocks in so I can tie down the plants so the plants can grow and eat my too-high nitrates - whew.

--Roc

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Got any old pantyhose lying around? You can make bags by cutting of a portion by the toes, then tying a knot at the open end after you have them filled. With a needle you would still be able to get the fishing line through it to secure the plants.

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Guest Isilme

My boyfriend is a really really enthousiastic fisherman (he fishes on carp and treats them as his babies, disinfecting wounds, splashing them with water,...). Instead of lead, he uses something new to throw out his lines, because he knows lead is polluting (he should because I study toxic effects of heaby metals!). It's a really good looking, heavy pebble (do you write it like this?), 5 cm long and I think it weighs almost 80g. There are also smaller ones. The pebbles have a tiny metal loop where you can attach the fishing line. I think is really decorative or your tank, handy to use and it's not expensive. I don't know if they have them in the USA of Canada though, I've only seen them in Belgium, but I think you should be able to find them.

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My boyfriend is a really really enthousiastic fisherman (he fishes on carp and treats them as his babies, disinfecting wounds, splashing them with water,...). Instead of lead, he uses something new to throw out his lines, because he knows lead is polluting (he should because I study toxic effects of heaby metals!). It's a really good looking, heavy pebble (do you write it like this?), 5 cm long and I think it weighs almost 80g. There are also smaller ones. The pebbles have a tiny metal loop where you can attach the fishing line. I think is really decorative or your tank, handy to use and it's not expensive. I don't know if they have them in the USA of Canada though, I've only seen them in Belgium, but I think you should be able to find them.

I should try that when I'll plant the tank (again :D ). With a bit af luck Godzilla wont be able to uproot them that way. That is the downside of rescue fish (from the wild wild little pond :D ) they see all plants and snails as food. On the other hand they love algea (even the brown muck).

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Guest Isilme

Just ask me (or Tim) then.

You can also collect nice heavy stones from nature and then glue (with aquarium safe glue) a tiny metal loop (for example something like the thing where you close your bra with, I don't know the word in English) to to stone. Should look really nice and is really cheap.

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Just ask me (or Tim) then.

You can also collect nice heavy stones from nature and then glue (with aquarium safe glue) a tiny metal loop (for example something like the thing where you close your bra with, I don't know the word in English) to to stone. Should look really nice and is really cheap.

Thanx :D

Isilme: A bit off topic: The food is not good for Gigi (slight SBD fishie) . I put it in the usual cup to soak, and now matter what I do of how long I wait, it still floats. It confused the fish: 'doesn't food normally sink?' 'why does it sinks upwarts'. 'Where did it go?' Then hungry eyes looking at me: 'food?'

Edited by Quasi
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Well, I don't think the smaller Anubias' are going to make it, though the big one seems to be doing okay. I ditched the Cabomba as it was just dirtying up the tank. The tall, thin, grass-like plants seem to be doing well and the fish aren't eating them so maybe I will just buy more of that, whatever it is.

--Roc

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