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Eel And Dragonet? Possible Co-habitation?


gonzofan432

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I've never had a saltwater tank, although I've fiddled around with other people's in the past and certainly have done some research. My husband would like a moray eel...apparently had one back in his hey-day. I've always wanted a mandarin dragonet. Is this at all possible? I realize eels can be tricky as can dragonets, but if he's going to get this eel as first choice it leaves me with very little to pick from for tank mates. It seems a zebra eel can live with more species of fish than other types of eels, but I've read they need 125+ g. tanks! Any input would be great. I personally don't want the eel, but I miss having fish around so I'll try what I'm able to.

Thanks!!!

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any species of moray will most likely be tempted to take a bite out of the dragonet, and the mandarin, having toxic slime as its main mode of defense, will probably end up poisoning the eel.

Tell you what, since mandarins are almost next-to-impossible to keep in the aquarium anyway (requiring a strictly live-food diet of copepods and amphipods), just stick with the eel... it'd be easier to feed and will eventually probably win you over with sheer personality ;)

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  • 2 weeks later...
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I fed my mandarin chopped shrimp... but not all mandarins take to prepared foods... And even if you can't feed it, keeping mandarins is popular thesedays and they're not so difficult to keep as long as you have an established large tank.

Yes, I think mandarins are too small not to tempt the eel... and yes I agree the mandarin may die and end up poisoning the eel too.

Talking about this makes me want to start a marine tank again lol

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Eels have HUGE mouths and will take down anything they think can fit into it. Best to stick to a large fish only/aggressive/predator tank.

And mandarins?? It can be done but is definitely not recommended for everyone. :) (I have a bottle of pods in my fridge as I type--the starters for what I hope will become a large pod culture!)

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Eels have HUGE mouths and will take down anything they think can fit into it. Best to stick to a large fish only/aggressive/predator tank.

And mandarins?? It can be done but is definitely not recommended for everyone. :) (I have a bottle of pods in my fridge as I type--the starters for what I hope will become a large pod culture!)

Hi, how do the pods stay alive in the fridge? Can you let me know how to culture pods? Thanks

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Sure thing--it's a project I'm working on now too. I plan to set up a small separate tank with a heater and an air pump for circulation. I am going to put lots of aged rock rubble in it, since the pods live in there. (Within our big tank I have this "pod pile" to keep a culture going in there too). I am also going to add a type of macroalgae called chaetomorpha, which looks like a spongy green Brillo pad. They live in that, too.

I was told not to go about my pod culture tank this way but it worked when I set up my 30 gallon mandarin tank. I like to kind of do things my own way, and this worked for me. I plan to feed the culture tank heavily with rotifers (tiny critters the pods feed on) and phytoplankton. Pods are also detritivores so I plan to feed the tank with things like mysis and sinking pellet food.

The question of how to harvest them came up too, but my plan is to simply switch out clumps of chatomorpha continuously with the main tank. I have a feeling this will work well.

I think I'll post a series of pics and how tos on here in case others are interested. I'll keep you updated on the progress, too.

As for the pods in the fridge, they are a type native to the Eastern Pacific so they are cold water and go dormant in the fridge. I was told they will work in a tropical tank but don't see how that's possible. If they are adapted to live in 50? water, how will they survive an 80? tank!?

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Interesting... I have always wanted to culture pods... That's also a good idea to harvest the pods..

The question is how do you get rotifiers and phytoplankton? I heard it's very hard to culture these

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Actually I just found a place locally who sells live ones!! I went to a marine aquarium convention in LA recently and they were selling live pods. It was the first time I had ever seen them anywhere.

You can find all this stuff online but it's sure not cheap. If you belong to a local club there are most likely aquarists who might be willing to share their culture with you.

(The phyto is usually readily available at any pet store that sells marine stuff--I usually use DTs live marine phytoplankton).

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