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Bamboo Shrimp


fishlord1

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Well, the lfs down the road from my house recently started selling Bamboo Shrimp, and I was thinking about getting some. The shrimp are about an inch and a half long. If I get any they will go into my ten gallon, which is currently occupied by five neon tetras, two rosy barbs, and two kuhli loaches. My first question is, do I have enough room to house the shrimp? If so, how many shrimp should I get? What are their requirements? Would my other fish eat them? This would be my first time taking care of shrimp, so I wanted to learn more about them before purchasing some. All help is appreciated. Thanks!

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Just from a quick google search about your fish and bamboo shrimp, it appears that you are pretty well stocked. I wouldn't add any more animals. I know how frustrating it can be to have a small tank, and to want to add more fish..... I've considered adding cories to my 10-gallon, but I just don't have enough room to have a group of them!

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I just started keeping shrimp myself. I have been reading a lot but still have a lot to learn. Everything I've read says that shrimp are much more sensative to water quality than fish. So you have to make sure you have (0) ammonia (0) nitrites and very low nitrates. Shrimp are also very sensative to copper so if you have plants don't fertilize them. Stress coat has things in it that can be harmfull to shrimp. Prime is prefered by most shrimp keepers.

Now about Bamboo Shrimp specificly.

Bamboo shrimp can grow to a size of 4 to 5 inches. There best kept at a temp. of 73?F-84?F. These shrimp are filter feeders meaning that they filter floating food items from the water. There should be a current in the aquaruim. They can pick up food from the ground if there is nothing to filter, although that situation should be avoided. They filter tiny food particles, such as microscopic microorganisms and detritus, out of the water as their main food using there hands. That's why there little pinchers/hands look funny.

Bamboo shrimp can live at least 5 years when kept under good conditions. They should be kept in community tanks with small, peaceful fish and/or shrimp and a good current. This is better than a species tank as its tank mates produce the detritus necessary for the microorganisms in the filter to thrive and reproduce. The microorganisms, in turn, are carried by the current to the filter shrimp and filtered out of the water as food. This way, the filter shrimp does not need to be specifically fed. Targeted feeding might actually deteriorate water parameters and harm the tank inhabitants, as it's very hard to gauge how much this shrimp actually needs to be fed.

All the bamboo shrimp being sold are caught from the wild. It's difficult to breed these shrimp because their larvae need salt water and go through several planktonic stages before metamorphosing into miniature shrimp. Bamboo Shrimp have rarely been successfully bred in captivity.

Cherry shrimp seem to be one of the hardiest shrimp and are good beginner shrimp. I've read that cherry shrimp are easy to keep and easy to breed and all cherry shrimp are raised in captivity.

Cherry shrimp is the kind that I have. I haven't seen any in stores but I got mine from a koko member.

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Since you are new to keeping shrimp, I would recommend you start with ghost or cherry shrimp. They are both hardier species, and are easier to keep. Plus, the bamboo shrimp can be a bit pricey. (I paid $8 apiece.) I wouldn't recommend putting a larger spieces like the bamboo into your 10g, as you are decently stocked already. My :twocents

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The place I go to doesn't sell cherry shrimp, they do sell ghost shrimp, though. I was worried that they would get eaten by my rosy barbs though, since these shrimp are so tiny. I didn't know bamboo shrimp got that big. Are ghost shrimp easy to keep alive? My lfs sells them as feeders, I was worried they might have diseases or something. What would I have to do for them? The bamboo shrimp here are $6. The ghost shrmp are about a quarter. I have seen cherry shrimp on this site before, they look cool, but never seen any around here before. Like I said earlier, the kuhli loaches will be gone, so that leaves me with only five neon tetras and two rosy barbs, would that give me enough room to house ghost shrimp? Thanks!

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The ghost shrimp might get eaten, and they reproduce fairly easily, so keep that in mind. They also need some shelter, like some shady plant or a small cave. I suppose you could try a few (3?) for awhile, and if they get eaten, well, you've only lost about 75 cents. :idont

So, yes, you could have a few ghost shrimp in your tank once the loaches are out, since they don't add much to the bioload.

Here's some more info on ghost shrimp:

Ghost Shrimp Info

More Ghost Info

Edited by Petperson04
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I have to agree with everyone. Bamboo shrimp aka wood shrimp need a tank thats been well established and they need tank mates that won't bother them(barbs are bad tank mates). These large beauties are also very sensitive to water changes so a stable environment is a must.

The best shrimp at start with are ghosties. Don't worry about them being eaten, its why stores sell them. If you can keep ghost shrimp alive for a few months then you should try your hand at a wood shrimp.

EDIT-

Thought I would answer your other question.

If you move the kuhlis to a different tank, 5-10 ghost shrimp should be fine in your 10 gallon. Unlike wood shrimp these guys will defend themselves. They can't really do any damage but their quick jumpy movements generally let fish know they don't plan on becoming food.

Edited by Sushi67
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I think that it would be best if you don't get the bamboo shrimp to start with since they are all wild caught. It would be better if you get the ghost shrimp, cherry shrimp or one of the many other dwarf shrimp (Caridina sp. or Neocaridina sp.) that are bred in captivity. Then once you become experianced at keeping shrimp and want to try breeding a more difficult speicies then get the bamboo shrimp.

Since I just started keeping shrimp I want to make sure that I can keep my cherry shrimp alive before I try keeping wild caught shrimp.

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Well, unless the place gets in some cherry shrimp, I think I'll try out a few ghosties. I'll wait to get the Bamboo Shrimp until I'm sure I can take care of them. If the barbs don't tear the shrimp to ribbons, I'll be fine with some ghosties. I would put them in my twenty gallon but that tank has enough fish as it is, including tiger barbs, which would practically maul any shrimp I put in there with them. The tank is stable, been running since September, but I don't want to risk the Bamboos, I didn't even know they were wild caught. I would like to find some cherry shrimp, though, I think they look awesome. But if not, I'll settle for ghosties. They do have a place to hide, a little ship ornament thing, they could also hide in some plastic plants. Thanks for the help, guys!

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Sounds like you have a good plan! Ghost shrimp are just as neat as the others; I am sure you will enjoy them. Sushi hit the nail on the head- they are very capable of defending themselves. I have seen two of my bigger ones have a boxing match over a piece of food! :)

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