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I Think My Red Cap Oranda Is Sick


Guest raflyn

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Guest raflyn

Ok, so I have a red cap oranda. First time fish owner, so it was a new tank + new fish. I THINK my fish has ick and fin rot, but now I have no idea. I'm treating for ick and treated for fin rot. My fish has one-two large, not so round, white spots on her red cap everyday (no where else) and they move all the time. Her fins have red veins (not streaks) are are kinda jaggedy, not sure if it's abnormal jaggedness or not. I'll try to get a good pic of her and post it but I am really lost now.

Any suggestions/help?

I don't know my water quality, my test strips died and I haven't had time to go back to the store. :(

Thanks!!!

Sorry I completely forgot about the box:

No test results.

3 gal tank

Eclipse tank with a carbon filter built in. size z. right now i'm not using the carbon filter for ick treatment.

changed the water every 2 weeks (had it for about four now)

sometimes do a 20% water change

One red cap oranda, 1.5 inch

I use Rid+Ich and fed her GelTek for finrot

I feed my fish brine shrimp, shrimp pellets, and goldfish crumbles. twice a day (not all three, just one type)

She eats just fine, gets really excited when food is there. Swims a lot, and does rub up against the wall (usually her face). Sometimes floats around at night.

Thanks gain.

Edited by raflyn
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  • Regular Member

Hi Raflyn and welcome to Koko's! :)

I'm sorry that you're having problems with your fish. The problems are mostly likely caused by something very familiar to most of us here... the size of your tank is far too small for your fish. Most of us have been there, too. Water quality is of the utmost importance to fish. We take care of the water, and the water takes care of the fish - is a good way of looking at it.

For fancy goldfish, like your oranda, you should have a minimum of 10 gallons per fish. You should try to get your fish a bigger home as soon as you can.

For a tank your size, you should be doing water changes every day. Especially when the tank is new, because the tank is going through "new tank syndrome". Start by doing a water change as large as you can with temperature matched, dechlorinated water.

It is VERY important to have a water test kit. Please get one of these as soon as possible. You need to keep track of the ammonia and nitrite levels - as these are lethal to the fish. Once your tank continues through it's cycling process, you will need to watch your nitrate levels. Ammonia and nitrite should be zero - or as close to zero as possible - during the cycling process to keep from harming the fish.

Fish in a small space, being exposed to ammonia and nitrite become stressed. This opens up all types of opportunities for parasites and bacteria to take hold of your fish. In a small tank - like you have - the bacteria can build up VERY quickly.

There is an enormous amount of information on this site about the cycling process, and how to keep your fish safe.

I'm not familiar with orandas, but the white spots may be wen growth. The red in the fins is probably due to poor water quality.

The rubbing against the walls sounds like it could be parasites, but let's let someone more knowledgeable with that help you there.

I would start with more frequent water changes (daily) and look into getting your new friend a bigger home. Many people here even use large (10 gallon or more) Rubbermaid containers. Don't forget a test kit! The drop test kits are the most accurate.

Good luck with your fish! :)

Debbie

Edit: You can bring a sample of your tank water to your local pet store, and they will most likely test the water for you for free. Be sure to ask them to write the numbers down for you! This is very important! The employees will say "It's fine" - "This is high" - etc.. but it is VERY important to know the numbers.

You will still need a test kit of your own. It is much more convenient, and with a new tank - you need to test daily.

Also - if you purchase a larger tank, you will need a filter that gives 10 times the filtration for the number of gallons your tank holds (gph). A 10 gallon tank needs at least 100 gph, a 20 gallon needs at least 200 gph, etc.

Okay - I think I'm done. :rolleyes:

Edited by Fishy Fish
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Guest raflyn

Ok...I only heard the 1.5 gal per fish, not the 10 gal per goldfish. I'm getting a ten gal tank on Sunday, and I will transfer her to that one soon. With a 10 gal tank, would I be able to have other fish in there with my goldfish? I will also buy some test strips on sunday as well. She's looking fine today, but her fins are still frayed on the endges.

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Hi raflyn I'm glad that your getting a a 10 g unfortunatly you can ONLY have 1 fish . Goldfish get rather large ecspecially an Oranda which can get VERY large .remember you still need to do daily water changes as your tank cycles please read up on the Nitrogen cycle this will help you tremendously..any more questions don't be arraid to ask. :)

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You might want to think about a 20 gallon if you'd like another fish. They need the space not only because they are dirty fish, and waste builds up quickly - but also because they're fish! They love to swim - and need room to swim! Think of it like keeping a Great Dane in a one room apartment. It's not fair to them. :rolleyes: The growth and health are stunted, also.

The frayed fins may take a week or so to heal, but with perfect water, it's most likely that they will. Stress can cause this. This link Stress In Fish can show you what can cause stress.

You mentioned getting test strips. I would recommend a liquid/drop test kit. They are far more reliable to check on your water quality.

Debbie

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Guest raflyn

Alright, thanks for the help! I'll prolly stick with the 10 gal since I'm a college student in a dorm, don't think a 20 gal would fit very well in here. :)

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Guest raflyn

I'm going to transfer my fish to the ten gallon in a few days, let it run the filter for a bit. Now I have a eclipse three gal that is empty. What kind of fish can I keep in there?

Thanks.

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Guest raflyn

Cool, that's what I was planning to get. They are really pretty, and my friend has one. With one better I can have a few live plants and a smooth decoration?

thanks!

I think my goldfish isn't sick, just stressed. Hopefully once she goes into the new tank she'll be all happy and healthy. :)

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Guest raflyn

Ok, so she's in the 10 gal tank now, but it hasn't even been 24 hrs and the tank is cloudier than the 3 gal one got. I have a aqueon 10 gal filter and three plants with just one fish. Are goldfish really that freaking dirty?

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:D Well they are very dirty, but I don't know that the fish is what's clouding the tank. It could be that it's all new, etc. Give the filter a chance to work, and it'll probably clear up soon.

In the meantime, did you get a test kit? You need to test the water every day, and possibly do water changes every day, to keep the ammonia levels down as close to zero as you can. Once you've battled the ammonia, you'll have the nitrite fight, and you'll have to keep those levels down. Once that's over, you'll have no ammonia readings, no nitrite readings, and only nitrates. These aren't so dangerous to the fish, and you can most likely get by with weekly water changes.

Any pictures of your fishy in his/her new home? :rolleyes:

And congrats on upgrading and taking great care of your fish! :exactly

Debbie

PS - I don't know anything about bettas, so I couldn't help with that question - but you can check out the betta section of the forum, and you can probably get answers there!

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Ok, so she's in the 10 gal tank now, but it hasn't even been 24 hrs and the tank is cloudier than the 3 gal one got. I have a aqueon 10 gal filter and three plants with just one fish. Are goldfish really that freaking dirty?

Now you need to test the water for Ammonia and Nitrite and to keep them at low level. So your fish wont' die. It takes couple weeks to cycle your 10g and prepare for a lot of water changes and water testings.

And welcome to this wonderful hobby.

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Guest raflyn

I'm going to mmm tomorrow so I'll get test strips then. Are there any good ones you recommend?

I have a friend and he's very negative about taking care of his fish. He says I'm paranoid that I want to get test strips and keep the levels correct, and that my water is cloudy wories me. I think he doesn't know what he's talking about. :P

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Can you get test drop kit instead of strips? The test strips are not acurate according to the most of people on this board since I never used one.

Tell your friend to join here and he will regret what he said to you. :exactly

Ok, you just posted a pic after I posted my reply. What type of filter are you using on your 10g? Your fish looks very cute and the water probably will get cloudier, so make sure test the water at least once a day.

Edited by 32Bit_Fish
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Guest raflyn

I'm using a Aqueon PowerFilter 10. it doesn't keep my water crystal clear like it says on the box lol. :P

When I test the water, and if it says levels are not right, what do I do? Change the water/add salt? I'm not sure if I can do full water changes once a week, but I can definitely do at least 20% changes a day or 50% a week.

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I'm using a Aqueon PowerFilter 10. it doesn't keep my water crystal clear like it says on the box lol. :P

When I test the water, and if it says levels are not right, what do I do? Change the water/add salt? I'm not sure if I can do full water changes once a week, but I can definitely do at least 20% changes a day or 50% a week.

Your tank water is cloudy is because the tank hasn't been cycled. So it has nothing to do with the filter you are using. It would take sometime to clear it out.

You got the test strips? I have no idea about these strips, so I can't help you.

Frequent water changes is better than a large w/c once a week. But it is better than not doing any w/c.

What's your test results for Ammonia and PH? What's your water temperature?

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Hi raflyn :hi

The API freshwater master test kit is the best kit to get. It tests the ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and pH.

What water conditioner/treatment do you use for your tank? Some - like Prime or Amquel - can help by binding the ammonia to make it less toxic for the fish, although it should still be removed. You can judge your necessary water changes by your test results. Starting with ammonia first, since that's what you'll see for a while: you want to keep it as close to zero as possible for the safetly of your fish. If it climbs above .25, and you do a 25% water change, it'll be closer to zero. You'll be taking away 25% of .25 of the ammonia, with a 50% water change you will be removing half. Do you see how that works? You have to keep in mind the "creep" factor, though. If you only remove a percentage of the ammonia, it'll add up each day - so you'll have to do larger changes every so often.

Higher ammonia numbers will mean larger changes to get close to - or at - zero. It's all in the test results. :) You probably won't have to do full water changes with the larger tank. They were necessary with the small one. Again - the test results will tell.

When you change the water, always be sure to treat it with a dechlorinator, and try to keep the temp matched if you can. I don't know that you'd need to add salt right now. I believe that'll be more helpful when you start showing nitrites.

Very nice tank, by the way! I like the Asian them you have going in it. :D I think the filter will clear your tank up in time. Did you give your gravel a good rinsing before you put it in the new tank? There are different things that could cause it. Just the new water, even.

You're not being paranoid with your fish. You're being a responsible pet owner, caring for the habitat of your fish. The water is the fish's sole environment. If you keep the water perfect for the fish, the fish will -more than likely- stay healthy.

Keep us posted - and don't be afraid to ask questions! Good job so far!! :thumb:

Debbie

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Guest raflyn

Ok, this is a quick reply question because I don't have test strips yet, once I get those tomorrow then I'll do a bigger update.

So, to be sure, medium sized white spots on the wen (which come and go) is normal and not ick? yay, cuz I was thinking "this is not ick SO WHAT IS IT?" lol And my water temperature is about 70 degrees. She swims around all day and looks really happy, so I'm glad I put her in the new tank.

Thanks for all your help! I'll post the levels tomorrow and do a small water change tonight.

I'm really glad I found this forum, cuz trying to find stuff online for goldfish can be annoying. :(

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When you only have white spots on wen it's usually growth on wen.. the white i would call it "buds" its just a tiny piece wen... If there is white spots on fins as well as their body then its probly ick .... you will see the unfamiliar behaviour when they swim... always wanted to scratch off the ick on gravels and other decorations ... How ick is triggered is when you have cold water added in your aquarium the ick become visable and will attach it to the fish. So always match the water temperature when you change water !! :rolleyes:

You have a nice red cap !! Good luck with your red cap

Edited by alanworm
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No, that's not my fish. I have a shubunkin. I google imaged "white spots wen" and found this photo. :)

You be sure to post pics of your fish when you get them. :D

Raflyn - how did you make out with the test kit? What were the test results? :)

Debbie

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Guest raflyn

Yay it's wen growth! I can't make it out to the pet store til tomorrow. I have a crapload of hw that is really important. I know my fish's life is extremely important to, but I'm going to live longer than that fish...and I need good grades... :( I'll have test results tomorrow for sure! And I'll be sure to keep doing 20% water changes (with same temp)

thanks for finding the picture! This has been really helpful for me.

Edited by raflyn
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