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Water Pump Size For Wet/dry Filter


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It is not neccessary to have 800 gph pump. You can still adjust the outflow from over flow box to match your pump gph.

Basic rule of thumb is 70% of bio balls is not supposed to stay under water. Only water should pass through them.

You bought one? :)

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It is not neccessary to have 800 gph pump. You can still adjust the outflow from over flow box to match your pump gph.

Basic rule of thumb is 70% of bio balls is not supposed to stay under water. Only water should pass through them.

You bought one? :)

No yet. I am doing search research and planing things ahead. :D

Does Wet/Dry noisy? I mean the water dripping sound? The tank is going to be in the bed room, not sure if it is a good idea to have one..

I never used one before, so dont know how to adjust the outflow from the flow box.

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Wet/dry is not too loud. The ones with the drip trays above the bioballs are less noisy as the water hits the tray and then is spread over an expanse of tray before dripping through the bioballs. There is some sound of falling water from the overflow/pre-filter, but it isn't too bad. And the only noise you'll get from return pump is if the water in the sump is a little low and it sucks some air along with the water. With your weekly water changes, that is rarely an issue.

You'll love wet/dry! Amazing at controlling ammonia and nitrites. Works exceedingly well with bare-bottom tanks because the biosurface lost with no substrate is made up for by the bioballs, pre-filter sponges and polishing block [sponge] if your system of choice has one.

Check out Proclear Aquatics wet/dry filters. They are my favorites. Not the least expensive out there, but very well made and well enginerred. Virtually maintenance free for 4-6 months at a time [except for weekly, rinsing the sponges in the pre-filter]. Replacement sponges and pads are inexpensive easily accessible on Amazon. And remember when buying, don't invest in a protein skimmer - pretty obsolete for feshwater.

Johnny

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Wet/dry is not too loud. The ones with the drip trays above the bioballs are less noisy as the water hits the tray and then is spread over an expanse of tray before dripping through the bioballs. There is some sound of falling water from the overflow/pre-filter, but it isn't too bad. And the only noise you'll get from return pump is if the water in the sump is a little low and it sucks some air along with the water. With your weekly water changes, that is rarely an issue.

You'll love wet/dry! Amazing at controlling ammonia and nitrites. Works exceedingly well with bare-bottom tanks because the biosurface lost with no substrate is made up for by the bioballs, pre-filter sponges and polishing block [sponge] if your system of choice has one.

Check out Proclear Aquatics wet/dry filters. They are my favorites. Not the least expensive out there, but very well made and well enginerred. Virtually maintenance free for 4-6 months at a time [except for weekly, rinsing the sponges in the pre-filter]. Replacement sponges and pads are inexpensive easily accessible on Amazon. And remember when buying, don't invest in a protein skimmer - pretty obsolete for feshwater.

Johnny

Does the Proclear wet/dry filter comes with a ball value control on the drain hose? I heard someone complainted about the "Slurp" sound from being the water going down from the overflow box to the wet/dry filter. Someone said you can adjust the flow rate to prevent too much of water going down to the filter by adjust the ball valve or you can insert an air line in the drain hose to prevent the noise?

Also I'm still trying to figure out what size of pump should I get for the wet/dry filter. Someone says get a pump that has 5x GPH of the tank. So if I have a 90g, then the pump should produce 450 gph of turn over rate?

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Also I'm still trying to figure out what size of pump should I get for the wet/dry filter. Someone says get a pump that has 5x GPH of the tank. So if I have a 90g, then the pump should produce 450 gph of turn over rate?

Last year I got a wet/dry filter with HOB overflow box rated for 600 gph so I figured that was the limiting factor. I couldn't pump more than that. So I looked for a pump that would pump as close to 600 gph hour as possible accounting for the head load (in feet). (Most pumps provide a graph that shows what volume of water it will pump for a given head-foot.) You should be sure to install a ball valve on the pump output line though so you can control the flow rate if you end up pumping too much water. That in conjunction with my canister filter rated for 450 gph make up the total filtration on my 125 gallon aquarium. A little shy of 10x the tank capacity.

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There is a guy selling ProClear 175 Wet/Dry Filter on Ebay. The filter rated for up to 175G tank, max flow rate 600 GPH. It recommended to use Pentair Quiet One 3000 pump which it pumps 780 GPH.

Would you guys think this is a perfect combination?

Thanks

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Does the Proclear wet/dry filter comes with a ball value control on the drain hose? I heard someone complainted about the "Slurp" sound from being the water going down from the overflow box to the wet/dry filter. Someone said you can adjust the flow rate to prevent too much of water going down to the filter by adjust the ball valve or you can insert an air line in the drain hose to prevent the noise?

Also I'm still trying to figure out what size of pump should I get for the wet/dry filter. Someone says get a pump that has 5x GPH of the tank. So if I have a 90g, then the pump should produce 450 gph of turn over rate?

I've had three of the Proclear Aquatic wet/dry filters and have used the size pump recommended by the manufacturer on each. I have a ProClear 300 on a 115g. tank now. I know the pump BRAND is QuietOne. Will check and see the size when I get home, this afternoon. I think it is rated 1200 gph. But, the filters do have specific recomendations - check them out on Amazon and click the "more information on this product" prompt. That will tell you exactly what size pump you need for the size filter you are thinking about buying.

And I don't have an issue with "slurping" sounds. Sounds more like a trickle, which doesn't bother me. Sounds kind of like someone pouring water from a pitcher into a glass. The only "slurp" sound we ever get is on the rare occassion that the sump needs water and the return pump is sucking air with the water.

Also note that the wet/dry fitlers need to be augmented by a good mechanical filter. I have two, Rena Filstar XP-4's on the same tank. I bought extra pieces of uptake piping and then used short pieces of flexible tube to get the opening of the uptake right at the center floor of the tank. That keeps the bottom immaculately clean. Nothing to vaccuum out when I do water changes, so I just plop a pump in the tank and pump water out the window.

Johnny

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I've had three of the Proclear Aquatic wet/dry filters and have used the size pump recommended by the manufacturer on each. I have a ProClear 300 on a 115g. tank now. I know the pump BRAND is QuietOne. Will check and see the size when I get home, this afternoon. I think it is rated 1200 gph. But, the filters do have specific recomendations - check them out on Amazon and click the "more information on this product" prompt. That will tell you exactly what size pump you need for the size filter you are thinking about buying.

And I don't have an issue with "slurping" sounds. Sounds more like a trickle, which doesn't bother me. Sounds kind of like someone pouring water from a pitcher into a glass. The only "slurp" sound we ever get is on the rare occassion that the sump needs water and the return pump is sucking air with the water.

Also note that the wet/dry fitlers need to be augmented by a good mechanical filter. I have two, Rena Filstar XP-4's on the same tank. I bought extra pieces of uptake piping and then used short pieces of flexible tube to get the opening of the uptake right at the center floor of the tank. That keeps the bottom immaculately clean. Nothing to vaccuum out when I do water changes, so I just plop a pump in the tank and pump water out the window.

Johnny

Thanks for the great info Johnny. I've never used one before, so any advices and suggestions on the filter would be helpful.

Do you use ball valve on both drain and pump output hoses? I think the ball valve gives you a good way to control the water flow from the wet/dry as well as from it?

So I need to have a stand alone filter that dedicated to be used for mechanical filtration only when I have a wet/dry on the tank?

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[

Thanks for the great info Johnny. I've never used one before, so any advices and suggestions on the filter would be helpful.

Do you use ball valve on both drain and pump output hoses? I think the ball valve gives you a good way to control the water flow from the wet/dry as well as from it?

So I need to have a stand alone filter that dedicated to be used for mechanical filtration only when I have a wet/dry on the tank?

You're welcome. Hope it helps. I don't use ball valves on the Proclear filters or the pumps. However, I position my return flow so that the water is directed somewhat toward the side glass of the aquarium. The water hits the side and is deflected to the front glass and then mixes with water from the canister returns, so it is swept downward and then upward. By the time the water is swept down to the middle section of the tank where the goldies prefer to be, the current is substantially reduced. There is actually a section of surface water in the middle third of the back of the tank, where the flow is very gentle. Anyway, I let my filters and pump run "full blast" for maximum turn over. The drip tray in the Proclear filter slows the water flow to a trickle over the bioballs so there is adequate exposure time for bio-filtration, without the need to use a ball valve to slow it down. And before hitting the drip tray, the water is diffused through two spray bars over the trays. I think a ball valve would be essential if not for the smartly engineered drip tray in the Proclear and can see why one would be useful with some wet/dry systems as suggested by Jim.

And since the overflow box to the pre-filter only skims the surface of debris [and most goldie waste and of course, sinking goldfish food, falls to the bottom of the aquarium], you need some form of mechanical filtration to keep the bottom clear of solid waste. Otherwise it will sit there until you vaccuum, because it won't make it up to the overflow box to be filtered out.

Johnny

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Are your bio-balls completely submerged in the water? I heard you need to have 70% of bio-balls stay above the water to enhance oxygen exchange process.

If this is true, then it is the best way to adjust the water flow by installing a ball valve on the pump hose. So we can control how much water goes in the wet/dry from the tank?? Am I correct?

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I'm not an expert but I believe it is not a good idea to restrict the pull (input) side of a pump. That's why I recommended putting the ball valve on the push (output) side. Also, the need to restrict the flow is not really related to the rate the water flows over the bio-media. It is more a function of the rate at which the water can flow through the overflow box. For example, if your overflow box is rated for 600 gph and you are pumping 650 gph then you will either starve your sump of water or overflow your aquarium. :krazy: The result depends on the relative size of your sump to your aquarium.

As I said, I'm not an expert but that is the way I understand things. You might try contacting Aquatic Ecosystems. They have some knowledgeable staff that should be able to answer your questions.

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I'm not an expert but I believe it is not a good idea to restrict the pull (input) side of a pump. That's why I recommended putting the ball valve on the push (output) side. Also, the need to restrict the flow is not really related to the rate the water flows over the bio-media. It is more a function of the rate at which the water can flow through the overflow box. For example, if your overflow box is rated for 600 gph and you are pumping 650 gph then you will either starve your sump of water or overflow your aquarium. :krazy: The result depends on the relative size of your sump to your aquarium.

As I said, I'm not an expert but that is the way I understand things. You might try contacting Aquatic Ecosystems. They have some knowledgeable staff that should be able to answer your questions.

Thanks for clarify that for me. I think I would probably be fine by go with a complete set of wet/dry filter and buy a pump recommended by the factory. So I dont need to worry about adjusting the water flow/starve the bio-balls, etc. I'm assuming everything will work perfectly fine with all factory settings/factory recommended components.

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Are your bio-balls completely submerged in the water? I heard you need to have 70% of bio-balls stay above the water to enhance oxygen exchange process.

If this is true, then it is the best way to adjust the water flow by installing a ball valve on the pump hose. So we can control how much water goes in the wet/dry from the tank?? Am I correct?

Honestly, I can only answer for the Proclear Aquatics wet/dry systems. I guarantee if a ball valve is useful on this particular system, it would come with one. I have always purchased the size pump recommended for the specific Proclear filter I am using and have not had an issue. Pretty easy stuff.

The Proclear filter is designed so that none of the bioballs are submerged. The water level comes up to the grate right below the bioballs; however, the sump is capable of containing about four or five times that volume. The recommended size pump will keep the water shallow and below the bioballs.

The sump is deep enough to contain all excess water the overflow is physically capable of delivering to the sump, in the event of a power failure. The system is virtually, flood proof if it is large enough. Remember regardles of what brand sump or wet/dry fiilter you buy, a good rule of thumb is the surface area of the sump should be no less than half the surface area of the aquarium. And the overflow should not allow the water to drop more than a couple of inches in the aquarium. A one inch drop in your aquarium [during power outage] results in a two inch rise in an appropriately sized sump. Again, with the Proclear filter, the sump is large enough to contain many gallons of water in the event of a power or pump failure. It's really pretty "goof proof".

Johnny

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For a 90g tank, I need a wet/dry filter that is rated for up to 180G tank or bigger (2x of the tank size)?

If you're talking about the Proclear Aquatic filters, I'd go with the 300 model. I've used one succesfully on a 90g, which I upgraded to a 115g. It fits very well in the cabinet with storage space left around the sides. I have a model 125 I am planning to use on a 55g. Basically, the biggest sump filter you can fit in your cabinet is what you should get. No such thing as "too much" filtration for goldies.

Between the wet/dry filter, two canister filters, religious water changes and live plants, I rarely register a nitrate reading.

Johnny

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Between the wet/dry filter, two canister filters, religious water changes and live plants, I rarely register a nitrate reading.

Johnny

Wow... rarely register a nitrate?? It's always an issue of getting rid of nitrate in our tanks.. It's amazing what filtrations could do to the water. People said the magic is in the water, I said the magic is in the filter in this hobby. :D

Yes, I would definitely go with a Pro-Clear, as matter of a fact, my lfs was recommending Pro-clear to me the other day. The 90G tank is 4 feet wide and I try to put all the buckets and other aquarium equipments in the cab under the tank. Not sure there are room for a ProClear 300 (it measures almost 3 feet wide). Besides I might need to get a canister, so it needs to go in the cab as well.

Is your 110G a 4 footer too?

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